How do you take a revolution to the polls? Some Egyptians apparently found the electoral potential of Monday’s vote, their country’s first since President Hosni Mubarak’s regime was brought down, to be wanting and boycotted the whole production, but many others were willing to deal with the lines and the overly complicated ballots to take part in the contested election. Some of them found themselves picking a feather or a basketball as they deciphered their hieroglyphic ballots. –KA

BBC:

Voting has been extended to cope with the high turnout and few security problems have been reported.

There had been fears the vote might be delayed after deadly protests against the interim military rulers who replaced Mr Mubarak.

Protesters occupying Cairo’s Tahrir Square have boycotted the vote.

The protesters fear the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces led by Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, which is overseeing the transition to democracy after decades of authoritarian rule, is trying to retain power.

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