An official tweet sent early Sunday morning shortly before this post went to Web said: “Due to high winds, we are temporarily halting all entry to @EDC_LasVegas. Fans inside, head to the grand stands. This is for your safety.”

The two biggest stages, if not more, are shut down here in Las Vegas. I was waiting for Calvin Harris to drop a hit or two on me when an announcer ordered everyone back from the main stage.

That venue, part of the Electric Daisy Carnival’s impressive array of performance spaces, is something to behold. Giant screens make the performing DJ look microscopic while hidden platforms allow dancers to perform their acrobatics. With scaffolding surrounding a central pit of what I can only imagine are thousands of screaming fans, it’s no wonder the festival organizers aren’t taking chances.

When I pressed at the media desk for an update, I was told the crew was putting safety first.

Someone here in the press room (I didn’t get a name) said Las Vegas policy requires a full hour’s wait after the winds die down before they’ll let the dancing recommence.

Strong, dusty winds have been blowing throughout the night — at one point the coffee mysteriously left my cup and at another I was nearly shoved down a flight of stairs by an invisibly force.

Hold on to your glow sticks.

Update: Fans inside the festival were allowed to stay until 5:30 a.m. and listen to music from temporary sound systems located on the infield grass of the stadium. The EDC was set to continue as scheduled on Sunday, according to organizers.

–Peter Scheer is in Las Vegas covering the youth vote at the Electric Daisy Carnival. Follow him at @peesch.

Wait, before you go…

If you're reading this, you probably already know that non-profit, independent journalism is under threat worldwide. Independent news sites are overshadowed by larger heavily funded mainstream media that inundate us with hype and noise that barely scratch the surface.  We believe that our readers deserve to know the full story. Truthdig writers bravely dig beneath the headlines to give you thought-provoking, investigative reporting and analysis that tells you what’s really happening and who’s rolling up their sleeves to do something about it.

Like you, we believe a well-informed public that doesn’t have blind faith in the status quo can help change the world. Your contribution of as little as $5 monthly or $35 annually will make you a groundbreaking member and lays the foundation of our work.

Support Truthdig