In spite of decades of international campaigns against child labor, children in Bangladesh as young as 10 years old continue to sew shirts and pants at all hours of the day and night.

Many of the 4.7 million kids working in Bangladesh come from rural areas where school is not an option. Indeed more than half of them have never been to school. In their labor, some oversee large industrial sewing machines. Others use glue to fix sequins on dresses. Their minimum wage is $39 a month. In a 12-hour shift, an average child worker will handle more than 1,400 shirts.

— Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

Toronto Star:

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