NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / CC BY 2.0

The rate at which vast areas of California’s Central Valley are sinking has accelerated as massive amounts of groundwater are pumped out to meet water shortages during the region’s historic drought.

Land in California has been sinking for decades as a result of excessive groundwater extraction during drought conditions.

The Guardian reports:

The research shows that in some places the ground is sinking nearly two inches each month, putting infrastructure on the surface at growing risk of damage. …

Mark Cowin, head of the California department of water resources, said the costly damage has occurred to major canals that deliver water up and down the state. In addition, wells are being depleted, he said.

“Because of increased pumping, groundwater levels are reaching record lows – up to 100 feet lower than previous records,” Cowin said in a statement.

The report said land near the city of Corcoran sank 13 inches in eight months and part of the California Aqueduct sank eight inches in four months last year.

Read more here.

— Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

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