In more than 200 cities, some 60,000 low-wage workers involved in the “Fight for $15” campaign—among them child care providers, Wal-Mart clerks and adjunct professors—staged an action Wednesday that highlighted the vast amount of public money spent to support underpaid workers.

A new study says low wages are forcing working families to rely on more than $150 billion in public assistance.

“Democracy Now!” discusses the “Fight for $15” movement with Steven Greenhouse, a former labor and workplace reporter for The New York Times.

— Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

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