It’s official: Caroline Kennedy will not continue her quest for the Senate seat vacated by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Kennedy reportedly told New York Gov. David Paterson on Wednesday that she was dropping out, and although he asked her to think it over for 24 hours she sent out an e-mail shortly after midnight saying she had withdrawn.

Update: The New York Times provided some details Thursday as to what Kennedy’s “personal reasons” might have been.


AP via Yahoo News:

But by 11 p.m. Wednesday, the associate said, Kennedy decided she couldn’t take the job if appointed, and she issued a statement shortly after midnight saying she was withdrawing.

Kennedy did not decide to bow out because her uncle, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, suffered a seizure during an inaugural luncheon Tuesday, the person said. The 76-year-old Massachusetts senator was diagnosed in May with an aggressive type of brain tumor.

The person wasn’t authorized to disclose the conversation between Kennedy and the governor and spoke on condition of anonymity. The person would give no other details about the personal matter.

Kennedy’s one-sentence statement ended hours of uncertainty as she appeared to waver.

“I informed Governor Paterson today that for personal reasons I am withdrawing my name from consideration for the United States Senate.”

There was no comment from Paterson.

Kennedy, the 51-year-old daughter of President John Kennedy, emerged as a front-runner to replace Clinton. But there were questions about her experience and her reluctance to answer questions about her finances.

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