Amid China’s explosive market-driven growth over the past decade, it’s sometimes hard to remember that it is technically a communist country. A dispute over property rights has brought the issue to the fore.

Truthdig’s Orville Schell examined this schism here.

N.Y. Times:

BEIJING, March 11 — For the first time in perhaps a decade, the National People’s Congress, the Communist Party-run legislature now convened in its annual two-week session, is consumed with an ideological debate over socialism and capitalism that many assumed had been buried by China’s long streak of fast economic growth.

The controversy has forced the government to shelve a draft law to protect property rights that had been expected to win pro forma passage and highlighted the resurgent influence of a small but vocal group of socialist-leaning scholars and policy advisers. These old-style leftist thinkers have used China’s rising income gap and increasing social unrest to raise doubts about what they see as the country’s headlong pursuit of private wealth and market-driven economic development.

The roots of the current debate can be traced to a biting critique of the property rights law that circulated on the Internet last summer. The critique’s author, Gong Xiantian, a professor at Beijing University Law School, accused the legal experts who wrote the draft of “copying capitalist civil law like slaves,” and offering equal protection to “a rich man’s car and a beggar man’s stick.” Most of all, he protested that the proposed law did not state that “socialist property is inviolable,” a once sacred legal concept in China.

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