Screen shot from CNN

Although the fatal shooting of Michael Brown by Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Mo., happened less than two months ago, that event transformed the community and put the spotlight on issues of race relations and police brutality in the U.S. for all the world to see.

Ferguson’s Police Chief Thomas Jackson made a bid Thursday to reconcile tensions that he and his department caused during and since the Aug. 9 shooting, apologizing to Brown’s parents and to peaceful protesters who were angered by their treatment by local officers (via CNN):

“I’m truly sorry for the loss of your son. I’m also sorry that it took so long to remove Michael from the street,” he said during his video statement.

Investigators were doing “important work” trying to uncover the truth and collect evidence during those four hours, Jackson said, but “it was just too long, and I’m truly sorry for that.”

“Please know that the investigating officers meant no disrespect to the Brown family, to the African-American community or the people (in the neighborhood where Brown was shot). They were simply trying to do their jobs,” Jackson said.

Jackson told CNN that he was aware of the calls for his resignation but said he would not step down at this point.

“Overnight I went from being a small-town police chief to being part of a conversation about racism, equality and the role of policing in that conversation,” he said. “As chief of police, I want to be part of that conversation. I also want to be part of the solution.”

Watch Chief Jackson’s apology below:

–Posted by Kasia Anderson

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