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Cecily McMillan could get up to seven years on her conviction of hitting a plainclothes policeman who grabbed her in Zuccotti Park. The persecution of the Occupy activist has become emblematic of the state's use of the courts to criminalize nonviolent dissent and try to crush new mass movements.The persecution of Occupy activist Cecily McMillan—facing up to seven years in prison—has become emblematic of the state's use of the courts to criminalize nonviolent dissent and try to crush new mass movements.

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Cecily McMillan—facing the possibility of seven years in prison for elbowing a plainclothes policeman in Zuccotti Park—is the latest victim of a cloaked offensive to destroy activist leaders.

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On the second anniversary of that day in lower Manhattan when people sat down in outrage and stayed in dedication and solidarity and hope, remember how unpredictably the world changes, remember those doing heroic work that you might hear little or nothing about but who are all around you, remember to hope and remember to build.

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Truthdig columnist Chris Hedges was in Zuccotti Park -- the plaza in lower Manhattan known to Occupy Wall Street as “Liberty Square” -- during the movement’s one-year anniversary The genie of protest it let loose can’t be returned to the bottle of society’s margins, he told RT AmericaTruthdig columnist Chris Hedges was in Zuccotti Park during the movement’s one-year anniversary.

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The one-year anniversary of Occupy Wall Street produced a lot of mainstream media stories that assured you Occupy was only a bunch of tents that came down last year. Don’t buy it. A year is nothing and the mainstream media is oblivious to where power lies and how change works.

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Daniel Berrigan, undaunted at 92 and full of the fire that makes him one of this nation’s most courageous voices, says there is one place where those who care about justice need to be -- in the streets.Daniel Berrigan, undaunted at 92 and still full of fire, says there is one place where those who care about justice need to be—in the streets.

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In the seventh episode of “The World Tomorrow,” Julian Assange and key Occupy figures from both sides of the Atlantic met in a hollowed-out Deutsche Bank building to talk about the movement’s inception and the challenges it has faced so far.

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