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Atop Wednesday's to-do list in the Senate was a vote on the proposed and revised version of the U.S.' Strategic Nuclear Arms Reduction treaty with Russia, which was running up against resistance from some Republicans in the chamber but still seemed likely to pass.

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Some members of the US Senate are dragging their feet and kvetching about wording issues in the latest American-Russian disarmament pact, the START treaty, as they prepare to vote for its ratification In response, they have received a clear message from Moscow .

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By stalling or killing President Obama's new START treaty, Republicans would provide moral support to Iran, North Korea and any other rogue regime seeking to arm itself with nukes.

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The pending START treaty, signed by Barack Obama but not yet approved by the Senate, is being reheated by the president after his trip to Asia and is set to be a top priority of both the White House and the Democrat-controlled Congress before newly elected Republican lawmakers arrive in January.

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"Between one and six." That's the number of nuclear weapons that U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton believes North Korea to have, a rare public utterance on the estimated number of such weapons the Hermit Kingdom may possess.

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President Barack Obama made the auspicious step of releasing his new Nuclear Posture Review on Tuesday, two days before he was due to co-sign an arms reduction treaty with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev in Prague.

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President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev have agreed on final terms for a new nuclear arms reduction agreement, a successor to the START treaty of 1991. The new deal will remove about a third of the warheads deployed by each country.

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Less than a year after President Barack Obama called for a world without nuclear weapons, the US and Russia have agreed to reduce the number of deployed nukes by more than 25 percent The White House hopes the agreement, which will (continued).

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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton winged her way to Moscow on Thursday to go over the nitty-gritty details of a new arms control agreement with Russian leaders that is targeted to replace the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) of 1991, but a successful outcome is by no means guaranteed in this round of negotiations.

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