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Why Hitler and '50 Shades of Grey' Are Amazon Best-Sellers
Larry's List

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Due to the inconspicuous nature of e-books, "Mein Kampf" seems to be in everyone's hands these days; scientists have created an algorithm that can predict whether a book will be a best-seller; working in the arts can lead to high levels of happiness. These discoveries and more after the jump.

The Digital Attack on Fellow-Feeling

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A philosopher's keynote speech on the subject of reading delivered at the annual meeting of the Writers' Union of Canada in May and republished in the August issue of Harper's Magazine contains startling figures that connect a rise in society-wide online activity with a drop in empathy and a rise in "narcissistic-personality disorder" in younger generations.

Reading in the New Millennium: Forward to the Past?
TD originals

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I know many Americans do not read any books once they’re out of school or college. But some do, and what they read has been shaped not only by changing tastes but by availability. The availability consideration is being revolutionized.I’m a bibliophile of the first water. I have spent what seems half my life in bookstores all over the world.

Lying to Our Children

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Education Secretary Arne Duncan feels that "we're lying to our children" when we accept low student achievement standards, a policy that sees many states promoting children to the next grade despite being inept at reading and math. Also, Santa isn't real.

Are the Kindle's Days Numbered?
A&C News

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Although Kindle sales have seemed strong since its debut nearly two years ago, the future of Amazon's e-reader may not be rosy, according to The Atlantic's Kevin Maney, who sums up the "Kindle problem" thusly: "[I]n aiming to provide both a great experience and supreme convenience, it has achieved neither."

Are We Too Wired to Read?
A&C News

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With multiple gadgets and screens constantly running, and perhaps even a different sense of time than our forebears had, it's no surprise that powering down long enough to curl up with a book is becoming an endangered activity -- although, as David L. Ulin argues in the Los Angeles Times, it's still a very vital contemplative practice to pursue.

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