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The average cigarette contains 10% more nicotine than it did in 1998 (some brands are 30% stronger). Seems a pretty effective way for "cancer stick" companies to hold on to their core market (i.e. the 70% of smokers who want to quit) in a time when the world has wised up to the health risks posed by smoking.

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With a July 21 poll revealing that half the country still thinks Iraq had WMD, the Associated Press asks several experts why this myth persists. One answer: people tend to become "independent of reality." This is not without historical precendent. Pictured above is Hiroo Onoda, a former Japanese army officer who was stationed on a Phillipines island at the end of World War II and who kept on fighting until 1974 because no one told him the war had ended.

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Stephen Colbert tells author Ron Suskind that Vice President Cheney's so-called "One Percent Doctrine"--whereby a one percent chance of terrorists obtaining WMDs must be treated as a certainty--is "soft on terror."

  • Colbert: "One percent? Shouldn't it be a zero percent doctrine? I mean even if there's no chance that someone's a threat to the United States, and they just look at us funny, shouldn't we just--[beats a fist into his palm]--tag 'em?"
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    Bush and Rumsfeld gave the go-ahead to CIA interrogators to threaten the family of Al Qaeda leader Khalid Sheik Muhammed if he did not talk, according to Ron Suskind in his new book, "The One Percent Doctrine." Former Bush defender Andrew Sullivan says the green light made Bush "the moral equivalent of a mafia boss."

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    Truthdig salutes Ron Suskind, the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer whose most recent book, "The One Percent Doctrine," stripped down Vice President Dick Cheney's counter-terrorism philosophy to its Strangelovian essence: If there is a 1% chance of a terrorist attack, America must respond as though it is a 100% certainty.

  • Click here for disclosures from the book, Suskind TV appearances, links to other writings and biographical information.
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