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President Obama nominated Gen Martin Dempsey on Monday to take over as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the top military adviser to the president Obama's first choice for the job, according to The Washington Post, was Marine Gen James Cartwright, who was reportedly denied the promotion for (more).

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The freshly sworn-in chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Michael Mullen, started his first day on the job with this revelation: "The fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan will one day end." That's a relief, coming from the newest member of Team Bush, but don't get too excited, there's more: "We must be ready for who and what comes after." Oh dear.

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It looks as though Gen. Peter Pace, whose term as Joint Chiefs chairman and the president's top military adviser is about to expire, may go out with a bang. While Gen. David Petraeus is expected to back the White House's push for an extended surge, Gen. Pace is likely to call for a major reduction -- by almost half -- of U.S. forces in Iraq in order to address the long-term needs of an overextended military.

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Outgoing Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Peter Pace says he did not resign voluntarily, but "I've been told I'm done." Defense Secretary Robert Gates openly admitted that he would not seek another term for Pace in order to avoid a difficult confirmation. Pace has been closely tied to the Iraq war and its fortunes from the start, and only made matters worse recently with a public declaration of homophobia.

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The Bush administration has announced plans to oust Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Peter Pace and Vice Chairman Adm. Ed Giambastiani. Pace was involved with the planning and execution of the Iraq war from the beginning, and his reappointment would likely spark a debate and raise uncomfortable questions in the Senate during his reconfirmation.

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President Bush has instructed Defense Secretary Robert Gates to provide a plan for increasing the size of the Army and Marine Corps. A major increase would take years to achieve and would not alleviate problems associated with the White House's plan to "surge" troop levels in Iraq.

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