Subscribe

inner-city

Book Review

by on

The result of six years of intensive fieldwork, "On the Run" examines the precarious lives of men who are in and out of prison, and the devastating effects on already impoverished urban communities."On the Run" examines the precarious lives of men who are in and out of prison, and the devastating effects on already impoverished urban communities.

TD originals

by on

The poor routinely vanish from city streets after encounters with police. They are swallowed up by jails and prisons for weeks, months or years for offenses often trivial or invented. These disruptions of lives have destroyed cohesion in urban communities, which live in heightened states of fear and troubling unrest.The poor routinely vanish from city streets and end up frozen in the penal system. The result is damaged urban communities.

on

A thoughtful, personal essay by photographer Hank Willis Thomas makes the case that the cultures of America’s inner-city black communities, once dignified by the gains of the civil rights movement, have been steadily degraded over the last three decades by corporate capitalism.The cultures of America’s inner-city black communities, once dignified by the gains of the civil rights movement, have been steadily degraded over the last three decades by corporate capitalism, writes photographer Hank Willis Thomas.

Book Excerpt

on

David Kennedy, author of "Don't Shoot: One Man, a Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America," spent more than 10 years in the worst corners of the worst cities in the country before going to Baltimore.

Personalize your Truthdig experience. Choose authors to follow, bookmark your favorite articles and more.
Your Truthdig, your way. Access your favorite authors, articles and more.
or
or

A password will be e-mailed to you.

Statements and opinions expressed in articles and comments are those of the authors, not Truthdig. Truthdig takes no responsibility for such statements or opinions.