Subscribe

deal

on

Senate leaders struck a compromise late Monday on the issue of disaster relief funding that is likely to avert a federal government shutdown, the third such threat this year. (more)

on

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is set to write his autobiography. A book deal worth more than $1.5 million will help pay his hefty legal fees and keep the whistle-blowing website afloat.

on

The health care deal the Senate and president are so excited about would scrap a public option in favor of a plan administered by the Office of Personnel Management. Guess who oversees the OPM? Joe Lieberman, unless Democrats take away his chairmanship, which they've shown no inclination of doing. (continued)

on

What is George W. Bush thankful for? The Iraqi parliament voted Thursday to approve an agreement outlining the terms of U.S. military operations in the country. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki described the deal, negotiated over a year, as "an agreement for the withdrawal of foreign forces from Iraq."

on

After months of conflict, Zimbabwean political rivals Robert Mugabe and Morgan Tsvangirai have finally agreed to share power. One problem: The deal is so confusing and vague, even close observers are having trouble sorting out exactly how it's supposed to work.

on

The July 2nd rescue of French-Colombian politician Ingrid Betancourt and U.S. mercenaries employed by the Northrop Grumman Corp. was heralded as a dramatic victory over the anti-imperial FARC guerrilla forces in Colombia. The real story may be significantly less daring. The mainstream media's heroic rescue narrative is being contradicted by claims that a $20-million ransom payment was made.

on

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's Cabinet has agreed to a German-brokered prisoner exchange with Hezbollah. It is believed that under the terms of the deal, Israel would receive the bodies of two captured soldiers in return for the release of five Lebanese prisoners and the bodies of 10 more.

on

Democrats and Republicans cut a deal in Congress on Thursday to rewrite controversial surveillance legislation. It's being billed as a compromise, but civil rights advocates are groaning over concessions including virtual immunity for telecommunications companies and the ability to spy on Americans without a warrant.

Personalize your Truthdig experience. Choose authors to follow, bookmark your favorite articles and more.
Your Truthdig, your way. Access your favorite authors, articles and more.
or
or

A password will be e-mailed to you.

Statements and opinions expressed in articles and comments are those of the authors, not Truthdig. Truthdig takes no responsibility for such statements or opinions.