Subscribe

broadcast

on

American university students are quickly losing an important means of sharing their passions and ideas with the public: college radio. Noncommercial student-run stations are being forced to the Web or elsewhere as college administrators sell their broadcast licenses to make some quick, much-needed cash. (more)

by on

In the age of Twitter and video-chats, the court apparently still finds that allowing the public to hear audio of its proceedings would be overly intrusive.

on

This clip is, as they say across the pond, brilliant. A humorous fellow by the name of Charlie Brooker has cracked the not-so-secret code to how one properly reports the news, and it involves meaningful hand gestures, well-timed freezes, man-on-the-street reportage and headless shots of overweight people milling through metropolitan foot traffic. Watch and learn!

A&C News

on

The American television industry is in crisis, according to Advertising Age critic Bob Garfield, who figures prominently in The Wrap's two-part look into the future of the industry. In fact, says Garfield, we're seeing early signs of "the total collapse of the network television model."

on

If ever there was required reading, this article by Sherry Ricchiardi in the American Journalism Review would be it. News coverage about the Iraq war, whether measured in column inches or broadcast minutes, by American news outlets is becoming a mere blip on the proverbial radar, even as lives and resources are still lost every day.

on

Despite opposition from Congress and the public, the FCC has decided it's in the nation's best interest to relax decades-old ownership rules that prohibit media giants from owning newspapers and broadcasts outlets in the same local market. The idea behind the old rules, crazy as it sounds, is that it's probably not a good thing to get all of your information from the same place. The FCC's three Republicans and America's media conglomerates disagree.

on

It has often been said that "The Daily Show" is the major source of news for many Americans, but a recent study found the comedy program to be just as informative as nightly news broadcasts. The only difference: While Jon Stewart and Co. dilute the news with humor, the networks fill their broadcasts with hype.

Personalize your Truthdig experience. Choose authors to follow, bookmark your favorite articles and more.
Your Truthdig, your way. Access your favorite authors, articles and more.
or
or

A password will be e-mailed to you.

Statements and opinions expressed in articles and comments are those of the authors, not Truthdig. Truthdig takes no responsibility for such statements or opinions.