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Will South Sudan 'Survive Oil-Fueled Neocolonialism'?

After thousands were killed in more than a month of violence, rivals in South Sudan have reached a cease-fire. Now, “a new documentary shows how South Sudan has become ground zero for contemporary colonialism in Africa,” “Democracy Now!” reports Friday.

The program continues:

Director Hubert Sauper’s “We Come As Friends” provides an aerial view of the conflict in Sudan from a shaky, handmade two-seater plane. The film depicts American investors, Chinese oilmen, U.N. officials and Christian missionaries struggling to shape Sudan according to their own visions, while simultaneously applauding the alleged “independence” of the world’s newest state. What emerges is a devastating critique of the consequences of cultural and economic imperialism. We speak with Sauper about the film, which just premiered at the Sundance Film Festival.

— Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

Alexander Reed Kelly
Associate Editor
In December 2010, Alex was arrested for civil disobedience outside the White House alongside Truthdig columnist Chris Hedges, Pentagon whistle-blower Daniel Ellsberg, healthcare activist Margaret Flowers and…
Alexander Reed Kelly

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