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WikiLeaks Latest Release: 'The Kissinger Cables'

Tracy Bloom
Assistant Editor
Tracy Bloom left broadcast news to study at USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. There she eventually became deputy editor of Neon Tommy, the most-trafficked online-only college website in…
Tracy Bloom

Julian Assange may be holed up in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, but WikiLeaks is still going strong. The whistle-blowing website on Monday published “the Kissinger Cables,” more than 1.7 million documents related to U.S. diplomacy from the 1970s. As evidenced by the name, many of the records are related to former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

The Guardian:

The data, which has not been leaked, comprises diplomatic records from the beginning of 1973 to the end of 1976, covering a variety of diplomatic traffic including cables, intelligence reports and congressional correspondence.

Julian Assange said WikiLeaks had been working for the past year to analyse and assess a vast amount of data held at the US national archives before releasing it in a searchable form.

WikiLeaks has called the collection the Public Library of US Diplomacy (PlusD), describing it as the world’s largest searchable collection of US confidential, or formerly confidential, diplomatic communications.

Assange told Press Association the information showed the vast range and scope of US diplomatic and intelligence activity around the world.

Read more

WikiLeaks spokesman Kristinn Hrafnsson discussed the newly published database on “Democracy Now!” with host Amy Goodman on Monday morning. Watch the interview below.

— Posted by Tracy Bloom.

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