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Where the Jobs (Still) Aren't

Geography is one of those seemingly stodgy fields that’s enjoyed an infusion of innovation in recent years, and here’s a sobering yet useful map of the U.S. to illustrate that point. Specifically, you’ll see how different zones of the country have fared in terms of long-term unemployment. Looking good, Middle America. –KA

The employment distribution map is featured after the jump on The Atlantic’s page.

The Atlantic:

The areas marked in red are those where unemployment has remained at least two points worse than the national average for 20 years or more. Those marked in green are those where unemployment has been at least two points better (i.e., lower) than the national average for 20 years or more. The other color-coding is indicated according to the length of time that a particular area has had unemployment significantly above or below the national average.

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