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The NSA's Been Inserting Tiny Circuit Boards Into Thousands of Computers Abroad for Years

hankinsphoto.com (CC BY 2.0)


hankinsphoto.com (CC BY 2.0)

Spies have physically hacked into 100,000 computers all over the world belonging to EU trade groups, the Chinese and Russian militaries and several other institutions in countries such as Pakistan and Saudi Arabia. The NSA claims it hasn’t done anything similar in the U.S. but if the last year and Edward Snowden have taught us anything, it’s that the agency lies.

Al-Jazeera America:

The New York Times on Tuesday cited documents from the National Security Agency, computer experts and US officials stating that the NSA uses radio wave technology to gain access to otherwise encrypted computers or machines that are not connected to the internet. …

The technology allows non-internet connected computers to be hacked, and bypasses encryption and anti-spyware systems that otherwise prevent hacking over the world wide web.

The NSA calls the effort an “active defence”‘ and has used the technology to monitor units of the Chinese and Russian armies, drug cartels, trade institutions inside the European Union, and US allies including Saudi Arabia, India and Pakistan, the Times reported.

The United States has accused the Chinese Army of launching regular attacks on American industrial and military targets, often to steal secrets or intellectual property.

US officials have protested when Chinese attackers have placed similar software on computer systems of US companies or government agencies.

The NSA said the technology has not been used in computers in the US.

Read more

—Posted by Natasha Hakimi

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