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RoboFlop

The new “RoboCop” film is a sterling example of how runaway corporatism flattens and sanitizes satirical art, Ben Walters writes at The Guardian.

Comparing the new adaptation with the first film, Walters laments:

It wasn’t just the satire that made Verhoeven’s movies such gems. They were witty and mischievous, with strong, clear storytelling, quirky production design and a vivid sense of the grotesque. They had giant, quivering grubs, nuclear-war-themed family board-games and Arnie dressed as a middle-aged woman in a fierce raincoat.

So far, their remakes offer little like that. Their scripts are po-faced and messy; they look like every other shimmery, machine-tooled SF action picture out there; and instead of engaging playfully yet seriously with the structural forces determining contemporary life, they offer straight-up sentimental heroism.

In other words, they’re in keeping with a studio blockbuster culture that celebrates turbo-charged techno-militarism and cashes in on audiences’ familiarity with established entertainment brands. Transformers and Avengers, I’m looking at you. By contrast, Verhoeven was an original and a provocateur. He wanted to make audiences squirm – to alienate them from the spectacle of fetishised violence even as he slathered it on. Good luck getting that greenlit today.

Read more here.

CBMTrailers:

— Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

Alexander Reed Kelly
Former Associate Editor
In December 2010, Alex was arrested for civil disobedience outside the White House alongside Truthdig columnist Chris Hedges, Pentagon whistle-blower Daniel Ellsberg, healthcare activist Margaret Flowers and…
Alexander Reed Kelly
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