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Republican Learns the Hard Way It's Not Easy to Commit Voter Fraud

Tracy Bloom
Assistant Editor
Tracy Bloom left broadcast news to study at USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. There she eventually became deputy editor of Neon Tommy, the most-trafficked online-only college website in…
Tracy Bloom

A Nevada Republican who was arrested last year after trying to show how easy it was to commit voter fraud in the state has accepted a deal from prosecutors. Roxanne Rubin, 56, pleaded guilty Thursday to a charge of attempting to vote twice. She was also required to pay an almost $2,500 fine, perform 100 hours of community service and promise to “stay out of trouble.”

The Las Vegas Strip casino worker was arrested Nov. 3 after seeking–and failing–to vote at two locations.

As Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller, a Republican, said, “If Ms. Rubin was trying to demonstrate how easy it is to commit voter fraud, she clearly failed and proved just the opposite.”

The Huffington Post:

Rubin said that she was trying to show how easy it would be to commit voter fraud with just a signature. “This has always been an issue with me. I just feel the system is flawed,” she told the AP Thursday. “If we’re showing ID for everything else, why wouldn’t we show our ID in order to vote?”

Rubin, like many Republicans, claim that the theat from voter fraud — which is close to non-existent — is why voter ID laws need to be in place. But Nevada has no voter ID law — other than for first-time voters who didn’t show ID when they registered to vote — and she was caught anyway.

The prosecutor in the case said he knew of no other voters in Nevada or elsewhere arrested for voter fraud.

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— Posted by Tracy Bloom.

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