Robert Redford opened the Sundance Film Festival by demanding an apology for the war in Iraq. The festival features several decidedly political films, including “Chicago 10,” which centers on demonstrations at the 1968 Democratic convention, and “Ghosts of Abu Ghraib.”


BBC:

Redford said he, like many others, had shown a “spirit of unity” with the U.S. government after 11 September 2001.

“We put all our concerns on hold to let the leaders lead,” he said. “I think we’re owed a big, massive apology.”

The actor, whose Sundance Institute for independent film runs the annual festival, usually steers clear of political messages in his opening speech.

Festival opener “Chicago 10” recounts the demonstrations surrounding 1968’s Democratic National Convention, which saw protestors clash with the National Guard.

Read more

Wait, before you go…

If you're reading this, you probably already know that non-profit, independent journalism is under threat worldwide. Independent news sites are overshadowed by larger heavily funded mainstream media that inundate us with hype and noise that barely scratch the surface.  We believe that our readers deserve to know the full story. Truthdig writers bravely dig beneath the headlines to give you thought-provoking, investigative reporting and analysis that tells you what’s really happening and who’s rolling up their sleeves to do something about it.

Like you, we believe a well-informed public that doesn’t have blind faith in the status quo can help change the world. Your contribution of as little as $5 monthly or $35 annually will make you a groundbreaking member and lays the foundation of our work.

Support Truthdig