In a summit that celebrated the absence of the U.S. on its guest list, Latin American leaders met in Brazil to discuss a post-U.S. hegemonic world. The talks, which centered on the “demise” of the capitalist model, also snubbed former colonizing nations Portugal and Spain in a further demonstration of the increasing political autonomy of the region.


Reuters:

The summit also did not include prior colonizing nations Portugal and Spain.

Latin American leaders on Tuesday blamed the global economic crisis on rich countries and welcomed Communist-run Cuba at a summit meeting designed to weaken U.S. influence in the region.

The presence of Cuban President Raul Castro at the meeting in northeastern Brazil was touted as a sign of Latin America’s growing independence from the United States, a far cry from the Cold War era when Cuba was expelled from the Washington-based Organisation of American States.

“The most positive thing for the independence of our continent is that we meet alone without the hegemony of the empire,” [Hugo] Chavez said in reference to the United States.

Previous summits of Latin American and Caribbean leaders have always included former colonial powers Spain and Portugal or the United States.

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