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'King's Speech' Rules in Oscar Race

Score 12 for “The King’s Speech.” Even with the recently retooled Academy Awards format, which includes 10 contenders for best picture, the quirky story of a verbally challenged King George VI nailed a dozen nominations in this year’s Oscar lineup. Other big competitors announced early Tuesday morning include the Coen brothers’ “True Grit” and, predictably, that hoopla-fueled Facebook movie, “The Social Network.” –KA

The New York Times:

The King’s Speech,” about friendship and speech therapy, garnered 12 nods, including best picture, best director (for Tom Hooper) and best actor (for Colin Firth as a stammering King George VI). The film had just won top honors from the Producers Guild of America over the weekend, and emerged as the leader in an unusually competitive pack of contenders for the best picture Oscar.

In the morning’s biggest surprise, “True Grit,” a western remake from the filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen, followed with 10 nominations, including best picture, best director for the Coens, and a best actor nomination for Jeff Bridges, who won the acting award last year for “Crazy Heart.”

“True Grit” has been an audience favorite since its release in late December but had barely registered in the panoply of pre-Oscar awards and was recognized not at all at the Golden Globes last week.

By contrast, “The Social Network,” an unauthorized look at the Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, dominated the early awards, but slipped somewhat in the Oscar nominations. It secured eight of those on Tuesday, including best picture. David Fincher was nominated for his directing, Aaron Sorkin for the script and Jesse Eisenberg for starring as Mr. Zuckerberg.

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