Image by The Guardian

A harrowing memoir by a current Guantanamo detainee illuminates the U.S. rendition and torture program from the perspective of one of its victims. The author’s advocates struggled for six years to get the manuscript declassified.

Spencer Ackerman and Ian Cobain write at The Guardian:

Guantánamo Diary, the first book written by a still imprisoned detainee, is being published in 20 countries and has been serialised by the Guardian amid renewed calls by civil liberty campaigners for its author’s release.

Mohamedou Ould Slahi describes a world tour of torture and humiliation that began in his native Mauritania more than 13 years ago and progressed through Jordan and Afghanistan before he was consigned to US detention in Guantánamo, Cuba, in August 2002 as prisoner number 760. US military officials told the Guardian this week that despite never being prosecuted and being cleared for release by a judge in 2010, he is unlikely to be released in the next year.

The journal, which Slahi handwrote in English, details how he was subjected to sleep deprivation, death threats, sexual humiliation and intimations that his torturers would go after his mother.

Read more here.

— Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

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