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Glenn Greenwald Suggests More Revelations Are Coming

Tracy Bloom
Assistant Editor
Tracy Bloom left broadcast news to study at USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. There she eventually became deputy editor of Neon Tommy, the most-trafficked online-only college website in…
Tracy Bloom

On the heels of breaking the bombshell stories about the National Security Agency’s secret phone surveillance and data-mining programs, the Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald hinted on ABC’s “This Week” that these reports were just the beginning.

“Should we be expecting more revelations from you?” host George Stephanopoulos asked Greenwald during Sunday’s program.

“You should,” he responded.

Greenwald said he hadn’t been contacted by the FBI or law enforcement officials investigating the leak, but added that he “would be more than happy” to discuss the matter with them if contacted.

“I will tell them that there is this thing called the Constitution, and the very first amendment of which guarantees a free press,” he said. “As an American citizen, I have every right and even the obligation as a journalist to tell my fellow citizens and our readers what it is that the government is doing, that they don’t want people in the United States to know about, and I’m happy to talk to them at any time, and the attempt to intimidate journalists and sources with these constant threats of investigation aren’t going to work.”

Greenwald’s appearance came on the same day that The Guardian published his latest report involving the NSA, this one involving the agency’s top secret tool to gather global metadata called Boundless Informant.

Glenn Greenwald at The Guardian:

The focus of the internal NSA tool is on counting and categorizing the records of communications, known as metadata, rather than the content of an email or instant message.

The Boundless Informant documents show the agency collecting almost 3 billion pieces of intelligence from US computer networks over a 30-day period ending in March 2013. One document says it is designed to give NSA officials answers to questions like, “What type of coverage do we have on country X” in “near real-time by asking the SIGINT [signals intelligence] infrastructure.”

An NSA factsheet about the program, acquired by the Guardian, says: “The tool allows users to select a country on a map and view the metadata volume and select details about the collections against that country.”

Read more

Watch Greenwald’s appearance on “This Week” below:

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(h/t The Huffington Post)

— Posted by Tracy Bloom.

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