Tens of thousands of Egyptians poured back into Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Tuesday for a demonstration against President Mohamed Morsi, who last week granted himself sweeping new powers — before a constitution could be written — claiming they were needed to protect the revolution.

Protesters waving flags and bellowing chants in one of the largest rallies against Morsi to date disagreed, saying the president and his Muslim Brotherhood party betrayed their portion of the Arab Spring.

“We don’t want a dictatorship again. The Mubarak regime was a dictatorship. We had a revolution to have justice and freedom,” Reuters quoted protester Ahmed Husseini as saying. Journalists, lawyers and dissidents, including Nobel Prize winner Mohamed ElBaradei, were expected to join the rally Tuesday.

Demonstrations were also held in Alexandria and other Egyptian cities.

— Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

BBC:

The president’s decree, known as the constitutional declaration, said no authority could revoke his decisions.

There is a bar on judges dissolving the assembly drawing up a new constitution. The president is also authorised to take any measures to preserve the revolution, national unity or safeguard national security.

Critics say the decree is an attack on the judiciary. It has sparked violent protests across the country.

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