In a response fit for a wronged lover, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad rejected a renewed effort from the U.S. to engage diplomatically, saying that President Barack Obama’s call to talks contained “three or four beautiful words” but that the U.S. had yet to change its ways.

The most telling quotation comes from Ahmadinejad’s laundry list of quite apropos complaints (read it as a scene from a bad soap opera):

“What changed? Your sanctions were lifted? The adverse propaganda was stopped? The pressure was alleviated? Did you change your attitude in Iraq, Afghanistan and Palestine?” –JCL

The BBC:

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad rejected a renewed call from the United States to engage diplomatically to overcome the nuclear standoff, saying he saw no change in Washington’s hostile policy.

Speaking at a factory inauguration on Saturday, Ahmadinejad said a message by President Barack Obama to mark the Iranian new year last month contained “three or four beautiful words” but nothing new of substance.

“They say that ‘we have extended our hands to the people of Iran but the government of Iran and the people of Iran pushed it back’. What hand did you extend toward us?” Ahmadinejad said in a televised speech.

Read more

Wait, before you go…

If you're reading this, you probably already know that non-profit, independent journalism is under threat worldwide. Independent news sites are overshadowed by larger heavily funded mainstream media that inundate us with hype and noise that barely scratch the surface.  We believe that our readers deserve to know the full story. Truthdig writers bravely dig beneath the headlines to give you thought-provoking, investigative reporting and analysis that tells you what’s really happening and who’s rolling up their sleeves to do something about it.

Like you, we believe a well-informed public that doesn’t have blind faith in the status quo can help change the world. Your contribution of as little as $5 monthly or $35 annually will make you a groundbreaking member and lays the foundation of our work.

Support Truthdig