An Egyptian court handed death sentences to the leader of the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood and at least 182 of his supporters for violence in the aftermath of the coup against Mohamed Morsi last summer.

The Guardian reports:

The court’s decision came two months after it referred the case against the Brotherhood’s “general guide”, Mohamed Badie, and hundreds of others to the state’s highest religious authority, the grand mufti, the first step towards imposing a death sentence.

They were charged over violence that erupted in the southern Egyptian town of Minya in July, in the aftermath of the army coup that ousted then president, Mohamed Morsi, a senior Brotherhood member. One senior police officer was killed in the violence.

Lawyers say the ruling can be overturned on appeal. It was not immediately clear how many sentences had been confirmed, with the lawyers giving estimates ranging from 182 to 197. In either case, it would be largest mass death sentence to be confirmed in Egypt in recent memory.

An earlier mass death sentence was decided for 683 people, including Badie. “Of the 683, all but 110 were tried in absentia, according to defence lawyer Khaled el-Komi,” The Guardian reports.

Read more here.

— Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

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