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Tag: Privacy

Orwell
guardian.co.uk

For Orwell, Life Imitated Art

It turns out that George Orwell, famed author of “1984” and originator of the term “Big Brother,” was spied on by his government for more than 10 years. Members of Britain’s MI5 suspected the writer of being a communist, until they bothered to read him, and were apparently baffled by his “bohemian” clothes.

Posted on Sep 4, 2007 READ MORE


Don’t Ask, Don’t Kvell

Yes, it’s hypocritical when a member of the “family values” party gets caught stepping out on his spouse or tapping toes in a restroom, but politicians of all stripes should be allowed to destroy their marriages in peace.

Posted on Aug 31, 2007 READ MORE


An Ode to Privacy

It wasn’t so long ago that thinking the government was reading your mail, listening to your phone calls, tracking your movements and snapping photos along the way meant you were just paranoid. Ah, the good old days.

Posted on Aug 7, 2007 READ MORE



danmahony.com

IRS Workers Fall for Simulated Password Scam

According to a recent internal audit, 60 percent of IRS employees fell for the oldest trick in the book, allowing auditors posing as help-desk employees access to their digital identities, and by extension your personal and private information.

Posted on Aug 3, 2007 READ MORE


FBI
militaryplaques.com

The Federal Bureau of Intrusion

Disturbing news from the FBI:  The top U.S. intelligence agency recently underwent an internal audit, which produced some pretty creepy results.  Even in a small sampling of the agency’s activities (the survey covered 10% of the whole organization, according to The Washington Post), the bureau was found to have violated privacy laws and agency rules some 1,000 times while monitoring phone calls, e-mails and other communications.

Posted on Jun 14, 2007 READ MORE


Bill Maher

Bill Maher Says Mind Your Own Business

On last week’s “Real Time,” Bill Maher took on conservative personality Michael Smerconish to defend John and Elizabeth Edwards’ right to privacy: “Since they announced this last week, so many people have become experts on what you should do when you get sick, when I don’t think it’s really anybody’s business but theirs.”

Posted on Apr 5, 2007 READ MORE


FBI Abuses Patriot Act Powers

An internal Justice Department investigation has documented multiple abuses by the FBI in obtaining the private records of U.S. residents. Even with the broad powers of the Patriot Act in place, the bureau is still required to certify that the phone, e-mail and financial documents it seeks are at least related to investigations of terrorism or intelligence activities.

Posted on Mar 9, 2007 READ MORE


MySpace to Share Sex Offender Data With U.S. Center

Internet social network MySpace has developed a sophisticated national database of sex offenders it uses to police memberships and protect users, many of them minors. On Monday, the company announced it would share the information with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in an effort to aid law enforcement.
(h/t: Sex Drive Daily)

Posted on Jan 29, 2007 READ MORE


Bush’s Pseudo-Watchdog Takes a Beating

President Bush’s puppet Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board held its first public meeting on Tuesday, getting an earful from civil liberty advocates and experts, including the ACLU’s Caroline Fredrickson, who remarked: “Clearly, you’ve been fiddling while Rome burns.” The group, though conceived by the 9/11 Commission and created by Congress, holds little power and its members serve at the pleasure of the president.

Posted on Dec 6, 2006 READ MORE


EU Rules Financial Spying Program Illegal

A European Union oversight committee has concluded that the data sharing program between the U.S. and a European financial consortium broke the law by violating the civil liberties of European citizens.  The decision may prompt the EU’s ruling body to sue Belgium for allowing the program to continue.

Posted on Nov 22, 2006 READ MORE


Marie Cocco: Longing for the Privacy of Carbon Paper

Hewlett-Packard used a digital snooping method known as “pretexting”—aka lying—to finger its directors who were leaking to the press. It just goes to show: When it comes to safeguarding the populace against such attacks, we’re still in the Wild, Wild West.

Posted on Sep 13, 2006 READ MORE


Facebook Rebellion
From Facebook

Friendster Rebellion: A Privacy-Concern Dam Break?

Bush’s warrantless wiretapping program failed to arouse much more than a collective shrug across much of America, but when the social networking site Facebook recently began broadcasting every change a user makes to his online “friends,” (“you’re out of my top-50,” for example), the community rebelled—quickly and viciously. Could this be the start of something?

Posted on Sep 7, 2006 READ MORE


Judge Orders End to Bush’s Warrantless Wiretapping

A federal judge in Detroit ruled that the government’s eavesdropping program is illegal and unconstitutional, and ordered an immediate halt to it.

  • Check out constitutional scholar and bestselling author Glenn Greenwald’s stellar analysis and opinion roundup.

  • Posted on Aug 17, 2006 READ MORE


    AOL Exposes Users

    America Online recently released the search queries of more than 650,000 of its users for ?research? purposes.  The data contained three months’ worth of searches that were attached to unique user IDs.  No names were included with the release, but private information was easily gleaned from some of the queries.

    Posted on Aug 8, 2006 READ MORE


    Parents Use Gadgets to Spy on Teens

    Invasion of privacy is not just for the NSA anymore! Parents have always snooped, but as the SF Chronicle reveals, new tech toys are taking what was once standard parental prying to a whole new level of unacceptable surveillance and spying. Whatever happened to good, old-fashioned conversation? (Via boingboing.net)

    Posted on Jul 10, 2006 READ MORE


    Powell - Knocking Privacy

    Share
    Posted on Jun 19, 2006 READ MORE


    Wen Ho Lee
    AP

    Victory For Wen Ho Lee

    The five media heavies who shamelessly promoted the government’s lies about the Los Alamos scientist chose to settle today rather than reveal their government sources.
    Lee was savaged by a media fueled by government rumors that he was spying for China, an accusation he was never officially charged with. Lee was imprisoned in solitary confinement for nine months in 1999-2000 and ultimately received an apology from the judge who heard his case. Truthdig says: The media was not defending freedom of the press but their own right to operate as a megaphone for government agents with an agenda to slander an American citizen. The media went to bat for government agents who broke the law.  When will those agents be held accountable?

  • Read Robert Scheer’s extensive coverage of the Wen Ho Lee case.

  • Posted on Jun 2, 2006 READ MORE


    Gen. Michael Hayden
    From NSA.gov

    Robert Scheer: Hayden—the Spook in Your Phone

    UPDATE: Michael V. Hayden, nominated by President Bush to head the CIA, is the man responsible for the most extensive attack ever on the privacy of U.S. citizens.

  • While head of the NSA, he oversaw the program that recorded the phone call records of tens of millions of Americans.
  • Want to take action? Check out StopHayden.org (includes video proof that Hayden is smugly incorrect about the privacy foundation of the Fourth Amendment).

    Posted on May 9, 2006 READ MORE


  • Google’s Wi-Fi Plan Stirs Big Brother Concerns

    The company’s free wireless service in San Francisco would allow Google to monitor all its users’ whereabouts—ostensibly to serve up location-specific advertising.
    The feeling you just got? That would be the hairs on the back on your neck rising.

    Posted on Apr 12, 2006 READ MORE


    Justice Dept. Rejects Google’s Stand on Privacy

    The U.S. government pushes back at the search giant, insisting that a request to examine millions of Internet users’ search queries would not violate privacy rights. This could lead to the most fevered technology trial since the Microsoft antitrust case. Check out an excellent Truthdig essay on the issue here.

    Posted on Feb 27, 2006 READ MORE


    ‘Total Information Awareness’ Lives On

    Remember that Orwellian-sounding data-mining program that was supposed to have been shut down two years ago? Turns out it’s alive and functioning—just under a different name. The National Journal has the blockbuster scoop.

    Posted on Feb 27, 2006 READ MORE


    Images of prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison were broadcast on Australian TV.
    Images: BBC / Illustration: Karen Spector

    In Their Own Words

    Newly released photos and videos of inhumane conditions at Abu Ghraib have again shone a spotlight on America’s treatment of its prisoners. Read the sworn statements by prisoners at Abu Ghraib, obtained and translated by the Washington Post in 2004 at the height of the prison abuse scandal.
    Excerpt: “As soon as we arrived, they put sandbags over our heads and they kept beating us…. And every single night this military guy comes over and beat us and handcuffed us until the end of his shift.”

    Posted on Feb 15, 2006 READ MORE


    Forget What You Searched For? Google Didn’t

    A Google beta tester says that we’re barely conscious of the level of privacy we’re ceding to the search company. column
    Also, Maureen Dowd doesn’t want Cheney ogling her Googling. column

    Posted on Jan 22, 2006 READ MORE


    Blogger Obtains Gen. Wesley Clark’s Phone Records For $89.95

    AMERICAblog’s John Aravosis says that his ability to do so is “outrageous.” | entry
    CBS and NBC both chime in with reports on the issue.

    Posted on Jan 12, 2006 READ MORE


    U.S. Opens Private Mail in Terrorism Fight

    Customs officials can open and read any mail sent from abroad, and do so whenever they deem it necessary to protect the country. | story

    Posted on Jan 10, 2006 READ MORE


    All Your Phone Call Records are for Sale, Cheap

    Anyone can buy a list of your incoming and outgoing calls, cellphone or hard-line, for $110. Congress knows, shrugs | more

    Posted on Jan 9, 2006 READ MORE


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