Top Leaderboard, Site wide
July 30, 2014
Truthdig: Drilling Beneath the Headlines
Help us grow by sharing
and liking Truthdig:
Sign up for Truthdig's Email NewsletterLike Truthdig on FacebookFollow Truthdig on TwitterSubscribe to Truthdig's RSS Feed

Newsletter

sign up to get updates


Truthdig Bazaar
Toward an Open Tomb

Toward an Open Tomb

By Michel Warschawski
$14.95

more items

 
Tags

Tag: Journalism


AP

Farewell to a Conservative Gentleman

Tony Blankley, the “right” in KCRW’s “Left, Right & Center,” has died of stomach cancer. He was 62. Truthdig Editor Robert Scheer remembers his public radio sparring partner as “a conservative gentleman in the best sense. Tony was always well-informed, decent, with a wry sense of humor. I never knew him to lower his standards. It was a pleasure jousting with him.”

Posted on Jan 8, 2012 READ MORE


Chris Hedges Lays It All Out

C-SPAN goes in-depth with Chris Hedges during this three-hour interview, probing the author’s entire body of work. It is a comprehensive and fascinating discussion with one of the most important reporters on what he characterizes as our collapsing corporate empire. Hedges’ column returns next Monday.

Posted on Jan 1, 2012 READ MORE



Photo of a Ramparts cover by SPJ

Dugald Stermer Wanted to Change the World

Dugald Stermer, illustrator and visionary art director of Ramparts magazine, the legendary San Francisco muckraker, died last Friday after a long illness. He was 74.

Posted on Dec 4, 2011 READ MORE



Ed Schipul (CC-BY-SA)

Dan Rather Says ‘Big Money Owns Everything … Including the News’

In a recent speech, Dan Rather, once one of the few voices trusted to moderate our in-home information supply, called the current state of the news business “upside down and backwards.” Inspired by Occupy Wall Street, Rather issued a call to get back to proper journalism, and he suggested that the job would fall to independent journalists.

Posted on Nov 29, 2011 READ MORE



Wikimedia Commons / Jmquez (CC-BY-SA)

South African Parliament Passes Bill Restricting Press Freedoms

In what looks to many civil rights watchdogs like an ominous throwback to the days of apartheid, the South African parliament passed a law Tuesday that significantly curtails the ability of the press to cover stories about politically sensitive subjects, according to the government’s standards.

Posted on Nov 23, 2011 READ MORE



© Jeff Pappas

Media Complain of ‘Hostile’ NYPD (Update)

Some of the nation’s most prestigious news organizations, including AP and The New York Times, are condemning New York City’s treatment of the media, writing in a letter that “police actions of last week have been more hostile ...” (more)

Posted on Nov 22, 2011 READ MORE



Wikimedia Commons / Kyle Cassidy (CC-BY)

Chelsea Clinton’s Coming to a TV Near You

Because this is just what the gravely endangered journalistic profession needs, NBC has elected to pluck former first daughter Chelsea Clinton from her hardscrabble life and groom her to become a special correspondent for “NBC Nightly News.”

Posted on Nov 14, 2011 READ MORE



Wikimedia Commons / SusanLesch (CC-BY-SA)

Away With Objectivity

It is assumed, as a divine command, that the journalist should be “impartial, objective, balanced and fair” as a prerequisite for being a true “professional.”

Posted on Nov 7, 2011 READ MORE



Vincent Desjardins (CC-BY)

When Newspapers Act Like Banks, Communities Suffer

“Why not occupy newsrooms?” That’s the question posed by David Carr, writing in The New York Times about the obscene salaries and bonuses (tens of millions of dollars in some cases) paid to newspaper executives in compensation for “picking the carcass clean.” (more)

Posted on Oct 24, 2011 READ MORE



AP / Andrew Burton

Let Them Eat Keller

Funny, he doesn’t look like Marie Antoinette. But when former New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller asks his readers if they are “bored by the soggy sleep-ins and warmed-over anarchism of Occupy Wall Street,” it displays the arrogance of disoriented royal privilege.

Posted on Oct 20, 2011 READ MORE


There’s Something Happening Here

This week on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: It’s all about Occupy Wall Street, which Pulitzer Prize winner and guest David Cay Johnston says is unlike any movement he’s covered. Also: voices from Occupy L.A., Nomi Prins, Scott Tucker and the NYPD arrests journalists.

Posted on Oct 13, 2011 READ MORE



Photo illustration from an image by Colin Grey

There’s Something Happening Here

This week on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: It’s all about Occupy Wall Street, which Pulitzer Prize winner and guest David Cay Johnston says is unlike any movement he’s covered. Also: voices from Occupy L.A., Nomi Prins, Scott Tucker and the NYPD arrests journalists.

Posted on Oct 13, 2011 READ MORE



Flickr / LianaAn (CC-BY-SA)

There’s a New Newspaper on Wall Street

Some say the media has done a less-than-stellar job of reporting on the Occupy Wall Street protests these last few weeks, but the 99 percent found a way to circumvent that: They published and distributed their own newspaper Saturday, aptly named The Occupied Wall Street Journal. (more)

Posted on Oct 8, 2011 READ MORE



AP / Jason DeCrow

What Do They Want? Justice

How can anyone possessed of the faintest sense of social justice not thrill to the Occupy Wall Street movement now spreading throughout the country?

Posted on Oct 6, 2011 READ MORE



We Are the 99 Percent

We Are the 99 Percent—And We’re Not Confused

Now that reporters are starting to check out the occupation near Wall Street (it took only three weeks), they have begun echoing the notion that protesters don’t know why they’re there. As Jared Bernstein of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities huffs in a pro-demonstration article, “Do these news analysts think it’s a coincidence ...” (more)

Posted on Oct 4, 2011 READ MORE



Democracy Now!

Amy Goodman Wins Major Settlement Over 2008 Police Abuses

Amy Goodman and two former “Democracy Now!” producers have won a $100,000 settlement three years after police stormtroopers surrounding the GOP convention in St. Paul, Minn., battered, bloodied and arrested the journalists. (more)

Posted on Oct 3, 2011 READ MORE



Flickr / erin m

Journalistic Objectivity Sours Wall Street Reporting

In an attempt “not to judge either side” involved in the anti-corporate demonstrations that have gone on near Wall Street since Sept. 17, New York Times reporter Brian Stelter used the word “battle” in a tweet to describe Saturday’s altercation between police and protesters, in which officers pepper-sprayed apparently peaceful demonstrators. (more)

Posted on Sep 25, 2011 READ MORE



Al-Jazeera English (CC-BY-ND)

Concern in New Egypt as Police Raid Al-Jazeera

Egyptian police raided the Cairo offices of the news network Al-Jazeera on Sunday in what is being interpreted by some of Egypt’s revolutionaries as a crackdown on free expression and a continuation of some of the autocratic practices of the regime of ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak. (more)

Posted on Sep 11, 2011 READ MORE


Dodging Missiles With Russian Smugglers

This week on Truthdig Radio, in collaboration with KPFK, we hear about the dark side of international freight; the downside of DSK’s dismissal; the power of journalism, and the fall of the Soviet Union.

Posted on Sep 1, 2011 READ MORE



Photo illustration from an image by Colin Grey

Dodging Missiles With Russian Smugglers

This week on Truthdig Radio, in collaboration with KPFK, we hear about the dark side of international freight; the downside of DSK’s dismissal; the power of journalism, and the fall of the Soviet Union.

Posted on Sep 1, 2011 READ MORE



Brooke Anderson (CC-BY)

A Special City Loses Its Voice

The death of the Oakland Tribune symbolizes the contempt that newspaper publishers feel toward the communities they purportedly serve.

Posted on Aug 26, 2011 READ MORE



Matthew Hurst (CC-BY-SA)

PBS Couldn’t Make Time for Bill Moyers’ New Show

Legendary broadcaster Bill Moyers is returning to television, flush with $2 million in foundation funding, but PBS opted not to carry his “Moyers & Company.” American Public Television will instead distribute the interview show for free to stations around the country.

Posted on Aug 23, 2011 READ MORE



Illustration by Peter Z. Scheer

Confessions of a Dead Tribune

For the last 32 years, I had been “Mark Heisler of the Los Angeles Times.” Before that, “Mark Heisler of the Philadelphia Bulletin” or “Mark Heisler of Somewhere” since June 1, 1967, when Gannett hired me at $125 a week. Suddenly, I was just “Mark Heisler.” Who in the hell was Mark Heisler?

Posted on Aug 19, 2011 READ MORE



AP / Charlie Neibergall

Don’t Believe Everything You Read About Michele Bachmann—or Anyone Else

In today’s tight media economy, reporters tend to be young, overworked, underpaid, inexperienced journalists grateful for their jobs and afraid of being fired. Their bosses, no doubt, are just as fearful. These journalists are easy marks for campaign hacks with a story to sell.

Posted on Jul 25, 2011 READ MORE



World Economic Forum / Monika Flueckiger (CC-BY-SA)

Murdoch: The Emperor Has No Clothes

The big guy always knows what’s going on, which is part of how he got to be the big man (or woman).

Posted on Jul 20, 2011 READ MORE



Ben Sutherland (CC-BY)

The Phone Hacking Scandal by the Numbers

The U.K.’s phone hacking scandal seems to keep getting bigger, with more revelations, resignations and arrests. Here’s a quick breakdown of some important stats in the scandal so far.

Posted on Jul 19, 2011 READ MORE


Keith Olbermann, John Dean Preview Rupert Murdoch Testimony

Rupert and James Murdoch will face the British Parliament on Tuesday, and John Dean (above) thinks the elder tycoon may not be used to the pressure: “I think that this is the first time that Murdoch has ever been in this kind of atmosphere where people can push him to answer ... questions he might not want to address.”

Posted on Jul 18, 2011 READ MORE



David Salafia (CC-BY-ND)

I Missed My Chance to Pee on Rupert Murdoch

I first met Rupert Murdoch at the urinal in the men’s room. It was 1976 in an office building somewhere in Manhattan.

Posted on Jul 13, 2011 READ MORE


Rupert Murdoch

Share
Posted on Jul 12, 2011 READ MORE


Truthdig and LA Press Club
truthdig.com / lapressclub.org

Truthdig Wins Top Honors at L.A. Press Club Awards

The Los Angeles Press Club held its 53rd annual Southern California Journalism Awards on Sunday night, and Truthdig emerged triumphant from the historic Millennium Biltmore hotel, taking home prizes for Best Website Exclusive to the Internet, Best Online Sports Writing and Online Journalist.

Posted on Jun 27, 2011 READ MORE



AP / Joseph Kaczmarek

Gone With the Papers

The increasing fusion of news and entertainment and the ruthless drive by corporations to destroy the traditional news business are leaving us deaf, dumb and blind.

Posted on Jun 27, 2011 READ MORE


The World’s Last Handwritten Newspaper?

Showing rare devotion to the craft of journalism, lifelong staffers at The Musalman in Chennai, India, have been publishing a daily newspaper penned in Urdu calligraphy since 1927. The kicker? No one has ever quit the paper ... (more)

Posted on May 25, 2011 READ MORE



Photo illustration from an image by Colin Grey

Bill Moyers: ‘We’re Almost Out of Time’

On this week’s episode of Truthdig Radio in collaboration with KPFK: the great Bill Moyers, Nomi Prins on the scandalous IMF and Cole Miller on grass-roots philanthropy.

Posted on May 18, 2011 READ MORE


Bill Moyers: ‘We’re Almost Out of Time’

On this week’s episode of Truthdig Radio in collaboration with KPFK: the great Bill Moyers on the desperate state of our democracy, Nomi Prins on the scandalous IMF and Cole Miller on grass-roots philanthropy. Update: Full transcript.

Posted on May 18, 2011 READ MORE



White House / Pete Souza

Obama Faked It for the Cameras

There was just one camera in the room with President Obama when he announced the death of Osama bin Laden—the one beaming his address to television. Afterward, a group of still photographers was let in and the president went through the motions, walking to the podium and pretending to speechify for 30 seconds. (more)

Posted on May 5, 2011 READ MORE


U.K. Courts to Journalists: Stow It

Parliamentary official John Hemming has drawn attention to a new type of court order forbidding members of Britain’s fourth estate to cover cases deemed too sensitive for public consideration. The order, known as a super-injunction ... (more)

Posted on Apr 17, 2011 READ MORE



fotologic (CC-BY)

Intellectual Prostitution and the Myth of Objectivity

The news-clown jabbers on screen, says this or that is so ... and, lo, it is so. More likely it’s “All the News That’s Shit to Print.”

Posted on Apr 3, 2011 READ MORE


NPR Left Turn

Share
Posted on Mar 21, 2011 READ MORE


Afraid to Watch the News, Millions Turn to Fox

With unprecedented crises engulfing the world, millions of television viewers are finding the news too stressful to watch—and are turning to the Fox News Channel instead.

Posted on Mar 20, 2011 READ MORE



Mr. T in DC(CC-BY-ND)

What’s So Scary About NPR?

Somehow nobody asked the most obvious question: If NPR were truly slanted toward the liberal side, why would a phony tape of a private conversation be needed as proof?

Posted on Mar 20, 2011 READ MORE



nytimes.com

NYT Puts Up a Paywall

Let’s try this again, shall we? The New York Times has experimented in the past with the idea of charging for content, and starting later this month the Grey Lady is launching a new pay-to-play plan and squirreling most of what’s fit to print behind a firewall.

Posted on Mar 17, 2011 READ MORE


Dave Broder: A Reporter at Heart

In an era of instant pontificators on every subject imaginable, Broder was willing to say, “I have no clue.” When Dave did allow as to how he had a clue, you quickly learned that it paid to listen.

Posted on Mar 9, 2011 READ MORE



Motorola

Google’s Eric Schmidt Kills Trees

The business brains behind Google tells The Atlantic about his decidedly low-tech taste in information: “For me, there’s no better place to get accurate, fresh information—well-reported information—than a newspaper.” Schmidt reads both the paper and Web editions of The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, and prefers “paper and ink” books to e-readers.

Posted on Mar 7, 2011 READ MORE



AP / Earl Gibson III

Betting on Arianna

In defense of Arianna Huffington. Not that the lady needs one, having been a leader in undermining the right-wing dominance of Internet reporting.

Posted on Feb 22, 2011 READ MORE



AP / Mark Lennihan

Huffington’s Plunder

The sale of The Huffington Post to AOL for $315 million, and the tidy profit made by principal owner and founder Arianna Huffington, who was already rich, is emblematic of the new paradigm of American journalism.

Posted on Feb 21, 2011 READ MORE


Glenn Beck Has a Point

Excuse us while we hold back the dry heave and acknowledge that buried in this obnoxious, childish rant of Glenn Beck’s, there’s a valid point lurking.

Posted on Jan 20, 2011 READ MORE



Flickr / Brandi Sims (CC-BY)

The Gulag Prisoners of Pennsylvania

In a recent story titled “A Push to Privatize Pennsylvania Liquor Stores,” New York Times reporter Katharine Seelye described a state-owned liquor store in Forest City, Pa., that ran out of eggnog before Christmas and concluded that customers of these stores are “like prisoners in the gulag” ... (more)

Posted on Jan 18, 2011 READ MORE



Flickr / (CC-BY)

WikiLeaks Waits for the Grey Ladies

Last week, the Guardian essentially condemned itself for publishing WikiLeaks material. The incident prompted a closer examination of how WikiLeaks decides what to publish, and it turns out the organization is taking its cues from the five establishment news publications it has partnered with.

Posted on Jan 13, 2011 READ MORE



AP / Rich Pedroncelli

The Story of a Lifetime

Covering the statehouse or city hall is regarded as the minor leagues of political journalism. But this year, these too-often-unappreciated scriveners are in the middle of one of the most important domestic stories in decades.

Posted on Jan 11, 2011 READ MORE


The Game-Changer List

This year was a game-changer, and what we need is a game-changer list. On that kind of list, I would drop one-off sensations, beginning with the oil spill, the Haitian earthquake and the mine rescue. No. 1 would be WikiLeaks.

Posted on Dec 27, 2010 READ MORE


View older articles: « First  <  2 3 4 5 6 >  Last »

View the most popular tags overall?

 
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 

A Progressive Journal of News and Opinion   Publisher, Zuade Kaufman   Editor, Robert Scheer
© 2014 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.