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Tag: Indigenous


Arthur Boppré (CC BY 2.0)

Brazil Seeks to Evict Indigenous Community to Make Way for Sports Contests

Brazilian authorities want to kick 30 members of the Maracana tribe out of a former indigenous museum where they have been living for six years in order to build support structures for the 2014 World Cup.

Posted on Jan 12, 2013 READ MORE



Fora do Eixo (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Miners Allegedly Killed Dozens of Indigenous Amazonians

A human rights group has reported an attack on the Yanomami tribe in Venezuela that has left up to 80 people dead after gold miners set fire to a communal house last month.

Posted on Aug 29, 2012 READ MORE


The War in Acapulco’s Backyard

The Mexican resort city of Acapulco is a vacation destination for U.S. travelers and locals alike, but a short distance away from the beaches, a battle among Mexican authorities, drug cartels and indigenous communities is playing out.

Posted on Jun 23, 2011 READ MORE



guardian.co.uk

Bolivia Set to Pass ‘Law of Mother Earth’

In a political move that would make John Locke’s head explode, Bolivia is poised to pass a law that would grant nature equal rights with those afforded humans. The Law of Mother Earth is expected to usher in a radical new conservation policy against pollution and exploitation.

Posted on Apr 10, 2011 READ MORE



Flickr / The Vetruvian Man

No Tourists Allowed

A small town in the depths of the Amazon has declared itself off-limits to tourists. Why? Locals complain of tourists behaving badly and the fact that little of their spending actually benefits the indigenous people.

Posted on Mar 25, 2011 READ MORE



AP / Eraldo Peres

Brazil Judge Blocks Amazon Dam

Plans to build a giant hydroelectric dam in the Amazon have been suspended by a Brazilian judge after the project sparked local and worldwide concern over its impact on the environment and the indigenous population.

Posted on Feb 26, 2011 READ MORE



Flickr / LiberalsWA

Aussies Elect First Indigenous MP

In a historic moment for Australia, an Aboriginal man has won a seat in the country’s House of Representatives, the first indigenous person to be elected as an MP in Australia’s century-long history as a democracy.

Posted on Aug 29, 2010 READ MORE


Eyak revival

Lone Frenchman Fights to Save Dying Alaskan Language

It’s not entirely clear what, besides a love of linguistics and an apparently compelling documentary, spurred young Guillaume Leduey to launch a one-man campaign to resuscitate an Alaskan language, Eyak ... (continued)

Posted on Aug 9, 2010 READ MORE


Morales
AP / Juan Karita

Morales Closes In on 2nd Term

Bolivia’s President Evo Morales, opinion polls running heavily in his favor, appeared headed for a second five-year stint as president as voting wrapped up Sunday. The “peasant president” commands wide support among the country’s poor indigenous people—65 percent of the population.

Posted on Dec 6, 2009 READ MORE


Peru Indigenous
amazonaws.com

A Victory for Peru’s Amazon Natives

After at least 54 people were killed in a bloody roadblock protest earlier this month, native groups in Peru have won a commitment from the government to revoke laws that opened the Amazon to foreign oil and gas companies to exploit indigenous land for resources.

Posted on Jun 17, 2009 READ MORE


Amazon
guim.co.uk

Peru’s War on the Indigenous

In clashes between native groups armed with spears and development interests packing guns, Peru has seen at least 50 people die and hundreds go missing after President Alan Garcia initiated a campaign to open the rain forest to foreign investors.

Posted on Jun 10, 2009 READ MORE



Flickr / Johannes Roith

Bolivia’s Indigenous Majority Catches a Break

Bolivian President Evo Morales, himself an Aymara Indian, has won a referendum on a new constitution granting special privileges to Bolivia’s indigenous people. The electorate split along racial lines, with the country’s elite white and mixed-race minorities largely opposing the measure.

Posted on Jan 25, 2009 READ MORE



Wikimedia Commons

Brazilian Indians Win Land Battle

The native people of the state of Roraima have won an important legal victory before Brazil’s Supreme Court. With 100 similar cases hanging in the balance, the court decided to keep an Indian reservation intact, to the chagrin of farmers, loggers and even some military leaders.

Posted on Dec 10, 2008 READ MORE


Canada to Apologize to Indigenous Groups

Following a similar move by Australia earlier this year, Canada’s prime minister will offer a formal apology to the country’s indigenous peoples for the state’s unjust treatment of them, most notably the forced enrollment of more than 100,000 native students in state-funded Christian boarding schools aimed at assimilating them into white society.

Posted on Jun 11, 2008 READ MORE


Morales y Garcia Linera
AP photo / Joao Padua

Opposition Calls for Referendum on Bolivia’s Morales

Evo Morales, the first indigenous president of Bolivia, will face a confidence vote in the next 90 days as opposition groups continue their push to remove him from power. The vote comes on the tail of last week’s unofficial and meaningless referendum for autonomy in which the wealthy state of Santa Cruz voted for greater independence from the federal government.

Posted on May 9, 2008 READ MORE


Australian apology
www.global-taino.blogspot.com

Australian Gov’t to Apologize to Aborigines

Even though imperialism clearly isn’t a thing of the past as a global phenomenon, the Australian government is preparing to verbally own up to a painful chapter from its own national history by formally apologizing to Aborigines for past attempts at “civilizing” their people via forced assimilation initiatives that spanned more than five decades.

Posted on Jan 30, 2008 READ MORE


aborigine
eb.com

U.N. Throws Native People a Bone

After 22 years of debate and opposition (not to mention centuries of exploitation and genocide), the United Nations has finally approved the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, a nonbinding treaty meant to promote the human, territory and resource rights of native people around the world. Only four nations voted against the measure: the U.S., Australia, Canada and New Zealand.

Posted on Sep 13, 2007 READ MORE


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