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Tag: Ian Sample


Scientists Find Possible Link Between Brain Development and Anti-Social Behavior

Brain scans by scientists at Cambridge University have highlighted “striking” structural differences between the brains of young men diagnosed with anti-social behavioral problems and those of their better-behaved peers.

Posted on Jun 16, 2016 READ MORE


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Will the Machines Ever Rise Up?

“Apocalyptic pronouncements from scientists and entrepreneurs have driven [a] surge in interest” in artificial intelligence, writes The Guardian’s science editor Ian Sample. But is it reasonable to expect that machines will one day willfully turn on their human creators?

Posted on Jun 29, 2015 READ MORE



Being Gay Is Only Partly Attributable to Genes, Study Finds

A study of gay men found evidence that male sexual orientation is influenced by genes, but not entirely, U.S. researchers say.

Posted on Feb 14, 2014 READ MORE



Nuclear Fusion Breakthrough Achieved

Researchers in California moved civilization a step closer to near unlimited clean energy.

Posted on Feb 13, 2014 READ MORE



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Do We Sleep to Clean Our Brains?

American scientists think they’ve discovered the function of sleep: to clear molecular buildup in the brain in what Guardian science reporter Ian Sample calls a “rubbish disposal service.”

Posted on Oct 18, 2013 READ MORE


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