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Tag: Disease

The Dawn of AIDS Ages Ago

Researchers hypothesize the first human infected with HIV was a Bantu hunter who came into blood-to-blood contact with a chimpanzee with a similar virus in a jungle in Cameroon more than a century ago.

Posted on Mar 6, 2014 READ MORE



USC Study Links Animal Protein Consumption to Cancer

Could consuming a diet rich in animal protein be just as bad for you as smoking cigarettes?

Posted on Mar 5, 2014 READ MORE



CVS to Pull Tobacco Products From Shelves

Americans jonesing for a cigarette, or any other tobacco product, will soon have to take their business somewhere besides CVS/pharmacy.

Posted on Feb 5, 2014 READ MORE



Cancer Planet Is Upon Us

Cancer cases are predicted to increase worldwide by 70 percent over the next two decades, “from 14m in 2012 to 25m new cases a year, according to the World Health Organisation,” The Guardian reports.

Posted on Feb 3, 2014 READ MORE



James Jordan (CC BY-ND 2.0)

West Nile Virus on a Deadly Tear in U.S.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention counts 1,118 cases of West Nile virus in the U.S. through the third week of August in what is shaping up to be the worst year ever for the disease since it was first detected in the country in 1999. Forty-one people have died from the virus so far this year.

Posted on Aug 22, 2012 READ MORE



Parker Michael Knight (CC BY 2.0)

Obamacare to Cut Health Services for Many Undocumented Immigrants

President Obama’s new health care law cuts money used to pay for emergency care for undocumented immigrants, a service that some of the nation’s most hard-pressed hospitals have long been required to provide.

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 READ MORE


Knocking on Bashar al-Assad’s Door

Last time on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: Juan Cole’s informed comment on developments in Damascus; Wal-Mart owns America; Internet hypochondria; Comic-Con culture clash; and unbundling education.

Posted on Jul 23, 2012 READ MORE



Photo illustration from an image by Colin Grey (CC-BY)

Knocking on Bashar al-Assad’s Door

Last time on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: Juan Cole’s informed comment on developments in Damascus; Wal-Mart owns America; Internet hypochondria; Comic Con culture clash, and unbundling education.

Posted on Jul 23, 2012 READ MORE



ana_omelete (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Medical Mystery Takes a Toll on Cambodian Children

Medical professionals are puzzling over why a hand, foot and mouth disease has killed so many children in a relatively small outbreak in Cambodia.

Posted on Jul 12, 2012 READ MORE



Centers for Disease Control

Scientists Make Killer Flu Virus Even Deadlier

More than half of the people infected with H5N1—the bird flu virus—are dead, so it’s a damned good thing the virus isn’t airborne. That is, until now. U.S.-funded researchers in the Netherlands have successfully engineered a viral H5N1 strain that can spread through the air, realizing fears of a potentially weaponized germ that infects easily and kills half its victims.

Posted on Dec 27, 2011 READ MORE



Dr. Lance Liotta Laboratory (CC-BY)

Chlamydia Climbing

Here’s a bit of bad news for the sexually active: Chlamydia infections in the U.S. reached an all-time high in 2010 with 1.3 million cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s the largest number ever reported for any condition, the agency says. (more)

Posted on Nov 19, 2011 READ MORE



Flickr/mckaysavage (CC-BY)

Seven Billion Reasons

These are daunting numbers, almost as unfathomable as that looming 7 billion figure. But there’s no need to turn away because the scope of the problem is simply too large to comprehend.

Posted on Oct 26, 2011 READ MORE



Flickr / curran.kelleher (CC-BY)

Big Tobacco Sues Over Graphic Labels

Tobacco giants, wary of the effect new government-mandated warnings may have on cigarette smokers, filed a lawsuit against the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday, claiming that the labels are unconstitutional. (more)

Posted on Aug 17, 2011 READ MORE



Wikimedia Commons / Mattosaurus

New, Killer Strain of E. Coli Crops Up in Europe

Here’s a reason to postpone travel plans to Germany: A new kind of E. coli bacterium has been discovered and has already killed 18 people and infected more than 1,500, according to the BBC.

Posted on Jun 2, 2011 READ MORE



Al-Jazeera English

Haiti’s Cholera Death Toll Rising

The death toll in Haiti’s cholera epidemic is rising. The toll now exceeds 3,300, official sources say, and the number of people infected has soared to 150,000 in just two months since the outbreak began.

Posted on Dec 31, 2010 READ MORE



Wikimedia Commons

Alzheimer’s Strikes Latino-Americans at a Younger Age

Here’s a startling statistic for you: Latino-Americans tend to get Alzheimer’s disease seven years earlier than white Americans. Researchers blame the phenomenon on limited access to medical care and lower levels of education and income.

Posted on Nov 21, 2010 READ MORE



bbc.co.uk

More Than 1,000 Dead From Cholera Outbreak in Haiti

Over the last year, Haitians have been hit by a catastrophic earthquake and harsh tropical storms, and now another kind of trouble has hit the Caribbean country: a cholera scourge that has already claimed more than 1,000 lives.

Posted on Nov 16, 2010 READ MORE



Al-Jazeera English

Cholera Threatens Haiti

A cholera outbreak that has killed about 200 people in rural Haiti is threatening to spread to the capital, Port-au-Prince, potentially endangering the hundreds of thousands of earthquake survivors crowded into squalid camps around the city.

Posted on Oct 23, 2010 READ MORE



U.S. Agency for International Development

Checking Up on the Millennium Development Goals

Anyone remember the Millennium Development Goals that nations made at the beginning of this millennium? Well, it turns out some people do, and they are meeting Monday to evaluate the efficacy of efforts to reduce poverty, disease, intolerance and inequality.

Posted on Sep 18, 2010 READ MORE



U.S. Navy / MC2 Ted Green

U.S. Leaves Iraq Much Worse Off

Iraq has between 25 and 50 percent unemployment, a dysfunctional parliament, rampant disease, an epidemic of mental illness, and sprawling slums. The killing of innocent people has become part of daily life. What a havoc the United States has wreaked in Iraq.

Posted on Aug 23, 2010 READ MORE



Flickr / jepoirrier (CC-BY-SA)

Breakthrough Test for Alzheimer’s

Researchers say they have developed a 100 percent accurate spinal tap test for the brain disease. Brain scans, too, have become a potentially important tool in diagnosing the disease. The new tests are significant because Alzheimer’s can begin more than a decade before symptoms show up and because there is hope that new drugs could be effective.

Posted on Aug 10, 2010 READ MORE


beer
Flickr / Bernt Rostad

Alcohol: For the Rheumatoid Arthritis That Ails You

This could be a case in which the cure may cause problems above and beyond the severity of the symptoms, but a study that sounds like more fun than others we’ve heard of has found that alcohol consumption may help ease the pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis, as well as check the disease itself.

Posted on Jul 28, 2010 READ MORE



Centers for Disease Control

Can Seeing an Illness Protect You From It?

Researchers in Canada showed young adults photos of obviously diseased people and found that the subjects’ immune systems were significantly more aggressive when later exposed to a glop of bacteria. Test subjects got a negligible boost from similarly upsetting, but not disease-y, images.

Posted on Apr 5, 2010 READ MORE



Flickr / tapasparida

Scientists Fear Chinese ‘Superbugs’

Leading scientists are criticizing Chinese doctors and farmers for what they believe is a reckless overuse of antibiotics in both the medical and agricultural industries, which, they argue, has led to an explosion of resistant “superbugs” endangering global health.

Posted on Feb 6, 2010 READ MORE


Bill Gates
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation / Prashant Panjiar

Gates Announces Huge Vaccine Pledge

Bill Gates made a big announcement at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on Friday. The Microsoft entrepreneur-turned-philanthropist revealed that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will donate $10 billion over the next 10 years to the cause of fighting disease around the globe through vaccines and immunizations.

Posted on Jan 29, 2010 READ MORE



Flickr / joey.parsons

High Blood Pressure Linked to Dementia

Before we scare you, keep in mind that if everyone in America who experienced high blood pressure—that’s about a third of us—got dementia, you would know about it. However, new research suggests that the relationship between hypertension and dementia is more pronounced and alarming than doctors previously understood ... (continued)

Posted on Jan 25, 2010 READ MORE


genome
Wikimedia Commons / Webridge

Scientists Crack Skin and Lung Cancers’ Genetic Codes

Scientists are now able to map the complete genetic codes of lung and skin cancer, and now an international effort is in motion to do the same for more varieties, including breast, stomach, liver, brain, mouth and pancreatic cancer.

Posted on Dec 16, 2009 READ MORE



securingpharma.com

Massive Malaria Vaccine Trial Begins

A new vaccine trial is underway in Africa in an attempt to control malaria, a disease that not only kills 1 million people every year, but also makes 300 million seriously sick. If the trial results come back positive, a worldwide vaccine could be available as soon as 2012.

Posted on Nov 7, 2009 READ MORE



flickr.com

District of Corruption

Washington, D.C., has the highest rate of AIDS in the country, and millions of federal dollars are spent trying to alleviate it. But a new investigative piece uncovers a corrupt system where books were cooked, corners cut, and $400,000 lost to a nonprofit launched by the leader of a cocaine ring.

Posted on Oct 18, 2009 READ MORE


flu suit
telegraph.co.uk

Japanese Anti-Flu Suit Lets Wearers Fight H1N1 in Style

Worried about catching the dreaded swine flu? Need to update your wardrobe with some stylish and tailored work solutions? You can do both with the Haruyama Trading Co.’s dapper new anti-flu business suit. That, or you could smear yourself in toothpaste, which isn’t exactly the best look for the workplace.

Posted on Oct 7, 2009 READ MORE


Swine Flu
haveeru.com.mv

Swine Flu Still on the Map

Like a really bad joke that won’t go away, the swine flu has reared its exaggerated head, now in India, after that country reported its first death attributed to the multi-appellated disease. Hundreds of Indians rushed to get tested in the western city of Pune, even causing fights among those in line at a hospital.

Posted on Aug 5, 2009 READ MORE



Flickr / CarbonNYC

Swine Flu Cases in U.S. Top 1 Million

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 1 million Americans have contracted swine flu this year. That figure dwarfs the 27,717 confirmed and probable U.S. cases, but it also means the odds of surviving the disease—127 people have died—are much better than previously thought.

Posted on Jun 29, 2009 READ MORE



HotWikiBR

Swine Flu Reaches Pandemic

It’s been 40 years since we’ve had a flu pandemic on our hands, but after roughly 30,000 swine flu cases spread across multiple regions of the world, the WHO held an emergency meeting and took the plunge. Try not to feel alarmed.

Posted on Jun 11, 2009 READ MORE


Cholera
time.com

Cholera Plagues Zimbabwe

Cholera, the scourge of centuries past, has infected 100,000 people in Zimbabwe, dwarfing the body count of the much better publicized swine flu and demonstrating once again the dramatic and tragic inequality of health care in many parts of the developing world.

Posted on May 27, 2009 READ MORE


Napolitano
Wikimedia Commons / USDHS

Napolitano ‘Cautiously Optimistic’ About Swine Flu

This will come as no surprise to Ron Paul (remember him?), but it looks like swine flu may be no worse than your garden-variety influenza virus, according to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.

Posted on May 5, 2009 READ MORE


pig
Flickr/The Pug Father

Swine Flu Comes to the U.S.

After infecting perhaps hundreds of people and killing scores in Mexico, eight cases of swine flu have been diagnosed in the U.S.—six in California and two in Texas.

Posted on Apr 24, 2009 READ MORE


Believe It or Not, 2008 Was Relatively Nonviolent

Peace is not at hand, at least not as Americans define it. Yet peace has been breaking out all over.

Posted on Jan 1, 2009 READ MORE



Flickr / mknobil

New Hope in the Fight Against AIDS

World AIDS Day turns 20 today, and while we still don’t have a vaccine, researchers continue to make lifesaving breakthroughs. A team at the World Health Organization in Geneva recently came up with a “thought experiment” that, according to a mathematical model, could end the AIDS epidemic in Africa in only a decade.

Posted on Dec 1, 2008 READ MORE



Richard Ellis on ‘Diagnosis: Mercury’

Thinking of whipping up another tuna casserole? You may change your mind after reading this convincing expose by Jane M. Hightower, a San Francisco doctor.

Posted on Nov 28, 2008 READ MORE


Googs Flu
google.org/flutrends

Google: ‘I’m Feeling Sicky’

While worries over Google’s “big brother” surveillance practices still worry many, a softer, more health-conscious side of the search giant is partnering with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. The tool, “Google Flu Trends,” uses the aggregate regional data obtained from flu-related searches to predict epidemics weeks before they can be diagnosed by traditional measures.

Posted on Nov 12, 2008 READ MORE


The Molecular Full Monty

A cohort of entrepreneurs and scientists is the cutting edge of the Personal Genome Project. In an act of altruism and/or exhibitionism, the PGP-10 have put their medical records, traits and genetic codes on the Web where all the scientists, paparazzo and peeping Toms can see them.

Posted on Oct 22, 2008 READ MORE


Anthrax Researcher Threatened Co-Workers as FBI Closed In

Friends’ and relatives’ memories of microbiologist Bruce E. Ivins, who apparently committed suicide last week as he became a top suspect in the 2001 anthrax attacks, differ greatly from the image of him invoked by the stories that have emerged about his threatening behavior in recent months.

Posted on Aug 2, 2008 READ MORE


AIDS ribbon
thecommonwealth.org

Study: U.S. HIV Infection Rates Drastically Underreported

The United States is in far worse shape when it comes to HIV infection rates than researchers previously thought, according to a new study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that attributes the whopping 40 percent adjustment to more precise research methods.

Posted on Aug 2, 2008 READ MORE


Hamilton post office
AP file photo / Brian Branch-Price

Scientist Targeted in Anthrax Probe Dies in Apparent Suicide

The apparent suicide of 62-year-old scientist Bruce E. Ivins on Tuesday shook up his co-workers at the military biodefense labs in Maryland where he’d worked for nearly two decades. But the significance of his death extended beyond personal tragedy when it emerged that Ivins was about to be prosecuted by the Justice Department for alleged involvement in the anthrax attacks of 2001.

Posted on Aug 1, 2008 READ MORE


New York skyline
Flickr / acnatta

Herpes Is Common Among New Yorkers

Twenty-six percent of adult New Yorkers are infected with the virus that causes genital herpes. That’s seven points above the national average. A new study by the New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene found that the disease is more common among women, African-Americans and gays.

Posted on Jun 9, 2008 READ MORE


Sex Education is Good For You
urbansemiotic.com

Bad News, Abstinence Fans

If ever there was irrefutable evidence that abstinence education doesn’t quite work, this is it. A new study from the Centers for Disease Control finds that at least one in four U.S. teenage girls is infected with a sexually transmitted disease.

Posted on Mar 12, 2008 READ MORE


kid sneezing
eb.com

A Blow Against the Common Cold?

It turns out a little echinacea might go a long way toward preventing a cold and reducing the duration of a cold, especially when combined with vitamin C. A new study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases analyzed 14 other studies and flies in the face of other research that has showed no positive effect from echinacea.

Posted on Feb 17, 2008 READ MORE


U.N. Downsizes AIDS Estimate

Finally, some good news in the world (relatively speaking):  AIDS scientists at the United Nations are ready to announce that they have been overestimating the scale of the viral epidemic for quite some time now, and that the spread of AIDS has actually been decelerating over the last decade.

Posted on Nov 20, 2007 READ MORE


Paying More and Dying Sooner

Not only are Rudy Giuliani’s figures about prostate cancer survival rates in the United States and Britain wildly misleading, but he’s also wrong on his general point: that a single-payer system, of the kind that Republicans call “socialized” medicine, inevitably would deliver inferior care.

Posted on Nov 13, 2007 READ MORE


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