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Tag: Disease


Anthrax Strikes Wildlife in Rapidly Thawing Arctic

Record-high temperatures are believed to be among the main factors in the emergence of the deadly disease in northwestern Siberia.

Posted on Aug 15, 2016 READ MORE


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VIDEO: Haunted by Ebola: Trio of HBO Documentaries Confronts Epidemic at the Human Level

Each story invites viewers to confront the disease at its various nerve centers: in and out of treatment tents, doctors’ quarters, victims’ homes, makeshift hearses.

Posted on Mar 14, 2016 WATCH & LISTEN



Raider Fan’s Loyalty Is Tested by News of Ex-Quarterback’s Brain Disease

Kenny “The Snake” Stabler suffered woefully from a condition brought on by head trauma. He deserved better from the NFL, and all pro football players deserve better.

Posted on Feb 5, 2016 READ MORE



Malnutrition and ‘Victorian’ Diseases Are Soaring in England ‘Due to Food Poverty and Cuts’

Cases of malnutrition have doubled and other “Victorian” diseases are soaring in the U.K., in what campaigners say is a direct result of Tory government austerity measures.

Posted on Oct 28, 2015 READ MORE



Northern Forests Face Onslaught From Heat and Drought

Many Northern Hemisphere forests face destruction as climate change brings both fiercer droughts and higher temperatures.

Posted on Aug 31, 2015 READ MORE



World’s First Malaria Vaccine Approved

After 28 years of development, European regulators have given the green light to the world’s first malaria vaccine. The disease killed an estimated 584,000 people in 2013, most of them in sub-Saharan Africa.

Posted on Jul 25, 2015 READ MORE



California Gov. Jerry Brown Signs Landmark Bill for Mandatory Childhood Vaccinations

The new law will require one of the strictest vaccination regimes in the country, and California is now one of only three states that does not permit nonmedical exemptions.

Posted on Jun 30, 2015 READ MORE



Prospect of Warmer Winters Doesn’t Mean Fewer Deaths

New scientific study pours cold water on the theory that mortality rates will drop in winter months as the climate warms.

Posted on Jun 26, 2015 READ MORE



Where Does Israel Get the Right to Lock Thousands of Civilians Behind a Gate?

For weeks, Israeli forces have shut a village of 6,000 people out from entering Jerusalem from the occupied West Bank; scientists find that when it comes to fighting bacteria that resist antibiotics, viruses may come in handy; meanwhile, one writer explains why Elizabeth Warren is right about the Trans-Pacific Partnership. These discoveries and more after the jump.

Posted on May 21, 2015 READ MORE


Bird Flu









Posted on May 2, 2015 ENLARGE



Lung Cancer Tops List of Cancers That Kill Women in Well-Off Countries

Here’s a sad bit of irony from the health news department: The type of cancer that’s killing the majority of women in so-called developed nations can be quite preventable in some cases—and it can come down to a matter of personal choice.

Posted on Feb 4, 2015 READ MORE



Shutterstock

We Are All Liberians Now

Ebola is a nightmare disease that travel restrictions cannot keep out.

Posted on Oct 9, 2014 READ MORE



Shutterstock

What Ebola Can Teach Us

The lessons are quite obvious at this point—and contain implications that are political in the most urgent sense.

Posted on Oct 9, 2014 READ MORE


Ebola: CDC Director Sees Progress From Dallas to Africa

While Spain attends to the first case of Ebola transmission outside of Africa since the crisis began, Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, expresses cautious optimism.

Posted on Oct 7, 2014 WATCH & LISTEN



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You Can’t Stop Ebola With Borders

The panicked, isolationist rush to seal off America from the rest of the world shows how little pundits and politicians understand infectious disease.

Posted on Oct 6, 2014 READ MORE



Shutterstock

Fact: Coffee Is Good for You

People “give up” coffee the way they do cigarettes and red meat, but numerous studies tell us that unlike those other vices, America’s liquid breakfast of choice has many health benefits.

Posted on Sep 29, 2014 READ MORE



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WHO: Ebola Outlook Is ‘Bleak’

The World Health Organization has issued a very frightening report that basically says as worried as we’ve all been about Ebola in West Africa, things are much, much worse.

Posted on Sep 22, 2014 READ MORE



L.A.’s Elite ‘Anti-Vaxxers’ Bringing Whooping Cough, Measles Back

Spurred by their shared concern that vaccinating their children will do more harm than good, parents in Los Angeles who have taken an anti-vaccination stance—“anti-vaxxers,” as those among their ranks are called—could be putting more than their own kids’ health at risk.

Posted on Sep 16, 2014 READ MORE


Paving the Future









Posted on Aug 10, 2014 ENLARGE


Ebola









Posted on Aug 9, 2014 ENLARGE


CDC Safety









Posted on Jul 19, 2014 ENLARGE


CDC Misfile









Posted on Jul 16, 2014 ENLARGE



A Grim Existence in the Sewers of Eastern Europe

Beneath Bucharest’s ornate architecture, Baroque palaces and tree-lined boulevards lies a decades-old city of suffering made of filth, frigid temperatures, addiction and disease.

Posted on May 22, 2014 READ MORE



Coffee Is on a High

There’s concern in the international markets over what’s happening to coffee production, under attack by drought, disease and rising temperatures.

Posted on Apr 27, 2014 READ MORE


The Dawn of AIDS Ages Ago

Researchers hypothesize the first human infected with HIV was a Bantu hunter who came into blood-to-blood contact with a chimpanzee with a similar virus in a jungle in Cameroon more than a century ago.

Posted on Mar 6, 2014 WATCH & LISTEN



USC Study Links Animal Protein Consumption to Cancer

Could consuming a diet rich in animal protein be just as bad for you as smoking cigarettes?

Posted on Mar 5, 2014 READ MORE



CVS to Pull Tobacco Products From Shelves

Americans jonesing for a cigarette, or any other tobacco product, will soon have to take their business somewhere besides CVS/pharmacy.

Posted on Feb 5, 2014 READ MORE



Cancer Planet Is Upon Us

Cancer cases are predicted to increase worldwide by 70 percent over the next two decades, “from 14m in 2012 to 25m new cases a year, according to the World Health Organisation,” The Guardian reports.

Posted on Feb 3, 2014 READ MORE



James Jordan (CC BY-ND 2.0)

West Nile Virus on a Deadly Tear in U.S.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention counts 1,118 cases of West Nile virus in the U.S. through the third week of August in what is shaping up to be the worst year ever for the disease since it was first detected in the country in 1999. Forty-one people have died from the virus so far this year.

Posted on Aug 22, 2012 READ MORE



Parker Michael Knight (CC BY 2.0)

Obamacare to Cut Health Services for Many Undocumented Immigrants

President Obama’s new health care law cuts money used to pay for emergency care for undocumented immigrants, a service that some of the nation’s most hard-pressed hospitals have long been required to provide.

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 READ MORE


Knocking on Bashar al-Assad’s Door

Last time on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: Juan Cole’s informed comment on developments in Damascus; Wal-Mart owns America; Internet hypochondria; Comic-Con culture clash; and unbundling education.

Posted on Jul 23, 2012 WATCH & LISTEN



Photo illustration from an image by Colin Grey (CC-BY)

Knocking on Bashar al-Assad’s Door

Last time on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: Juan Cole’s informed comment on developments in Damascus; Wal-Mart owns America; Internet hypochondria; Comic Con culture clash, and unbundling education.

Posted on Jul 23, 2012 READ MORE



ana_omelete (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Medical Mystery Takes a Toll on Cambodian Children

Medical professionals are puzzling over why a hand, foot and mouth disease has killed so many children in a relatively small outbreak in Cambodia.

Posted on Jul 12, 2012 READ MORE



Centers for Disease Control

Scientists Make Killer Flu Virus Even Deadlier

More than half of the people infected with H5N1—the bird flu virus—are dead, so it’s a damned good thing the virus isn’t airborne. That is, until now. U.S.-funded researchers in the Netherlands have successfully engineered a viral H5N1 strain that can spread through the air, realizing fears of a potentially weaponized germ that infects easily and kills half its victims.

Posted on Dec 27, 2011 READ MORE



Dr. Lance Liotta Laboratory (CC-BY)

Chlamydia Climbing

Here’s a bit of bad news for the sexually active: Chlamydia infections in the U.S. reached an all-time high in 2010 with 1.3 million cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s the largest number ever reported for any condition, the agency says. (more)

Posted on Nov 19, 2011 READ MORE



Flickr/mckaysavage (CC-BY)

Seven Billion Reasons

These are daunting numbers, almost as unfathomable as that looming 7 billion figure. But there’s no need to turn away because the scope of the problem is simply too large to comprehend.

Posted on Oct 26, 2011 READ MORE



Flickr / curran.kelleher (CC-BY)

Big Tobacco Sues Over Graphic Labels

Tobacco giants, wary of the effect new government-mandated warnings may have on cigarette smokers, filed a lawsuit against the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday, claiming that the labels are unconstitutional. (more)

Posted on Aug 17, 2011 READ MORE



Wikimedia Commons / Mattosaurus

New, Killer Strain of E. Coli Crops Up in Europe

Here’s a reason to postpone travel plans to Germany: A new kind of E. coli bacterium has been discovered and has already killed 18 people and infected more than 1,500, according to the BBC.

Posted on Jun 2, 2011 READ MORE



Al-Jazeera English

Haiti’s Cholera Death Toll Rising

The death toll in Haiti’s cholera epidemic is rising. The toll now exceeds 3,300, official sources say, and the number of people infected has soared to 150,000 in just two months since the outbreak began.

Posted on Dec 31, 2010 READ MORE



Wikimedia Commons

Alzheimer’s Strikes Latino-Americans at a Younger Age

Here’s a startling statistic for you: Latino-Americans tend to get Alzheimer’s disease seven years earlier than white Americans. Researchers blame the phenomenon on limited access to medical care and lower levels of education and income.

Posted on Nov 21, 2010 READ MORE



bbc.co.uk

More Than 1,000 Dead From Cholera Outbreak in Haiti

Over the last year, Haitians have been hit by a catastrophic earthquake and harsh tropical storms, and now another kind of trouble has hit the Caribbean country: a cholera scourge that has already claimed more than 1,000 lives.

Posted on Nov 16, 2010 READ MORE



Al-Jazeera English

Cholera Threatens Haiti

A cholera outbreak that has killed about 200 people in rural Haiti is threatening to spread to the capital, Port-au-Prince, potentially endangering the hundreds of thousands of earthquake survivors crowded into squalid camps around the city.

Posted on Oct 23, 2010 READ MORE



U.S. Agency for International Development

Checking Up on the Millennium Development Goals

Anyone remember the Millennium Development Goals that nations made at the beginning of this millennium? Well, it turns out some people do, and they are meeting Monday to evaluate the efficacy of efforts to reduce poverty, disease, intolerance and inequality.

Posted on Sep 18, 2010 READ MORE



U.S. Navy / MC2 Ted Green

U.S. Leaves Iraq Much Worse Off

Iraq has between 25 and 50 percent unemployment, a dysfunctional parliament, rampant disease, an epidemic of mental illness, and sprawling slums. The killing of innocent people has become part of daily life. What a havoc the United States has wreaked in Iraq.

Posted on Aug 23, 2010 READ MORE



Flickr / jepoirrier (CC-BY-SA)

Breakthrough Test for Alzheimer’s

Researchers say they have developed a 100 percent accurate spinal tap test for the brain disease. Brain scans, too, have become a potentially important tool in diagnosing the disease. The new tests are significant because Alzheimer’s can begin more than a decade before symptoms show up and because there is hope that new drugs could be effective.

Posted on Aug 10, 2010 READ MORE


beer
Flickr / Bernt Rostad

Alcohol: For the Rheumatoid Arthritis That Ails You

This could be a case in which the cure may cause problems above and beyond the severity of the symptoms, but a study that sounds like more fun than others we’ve heard of has found that alcohol consumption may help ease the pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis, as well as check the disease itself.

Posted on Jul 28, 2010 READ MORE



Centers for Disease Control

Can Seeing an Illness Protect You From It?

Researchers in Canada showed young adults photos of obviously diseased people and found that the subjects’ immune systems were significantly more aggressive when later exposed to a glop of bacteria. Test subjects got a negligible boost from similarly upsetting, but not disease-y, images.

Posted on Apr 5, 2010 READ MORE



Flickr / tapasparida

Scientists Fear Chinese ‘Superbugs’

Leading scientists are criticizing Chinese doctors and farmers for what they believe is a reckless overuse of antibiotics in both the medical and agricultural industries, which, they argue, has led to an explosion of resistant “superbugs” endangering global health.

Posted on Feb 6, 2010 READ MORE


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