Top Leaderboard, Site wide
August 29, 2014
Truthdig: Drilling Beneath the Headlines
Help us grow by sharing
and liking Truthdig:
Sign up for Truthdig's Email NewsletterLike Truthdig on FacebookFollow Truthdig on TwitterSubscribe to Truthdig's RSS Feed

Newsletter

sign up to get updates


Truthdig Bazaar more items

 
Tags

Tag: Book Review


Robert Scheer’s Mini Review of Glenn Greenwald’s New Book

It is 4 a.m. and I have just finished reading, in one sitting, the Kindle download of a book that I intended only to skim because I thought that I knew the full story.

Posted on May 13, 2014 READ MORE



Knopf

Diane Ravitch Reviews ‘Reign of Error’ Review: ‘Beautiful’

It’s always nice when, tasked with writing a book review involving a key figure in a certain field of which one is well acquainted, one ultimately has good things to say about the book in question.

Posted on Dec 17, 2013 READ MORE


Truthdig and LA Press Club
truthdig.com / lapressclub.org

Truthdig Critics Win National Entertainment Journalism Awards

Peter Richardson and Chris Hedges took home the first and second place trophies, respectively, in the online critic category at the L.A. Press Club’s Sixth Annual National Entertainment Journalism Awards on Sunday.

Posted on Nov 25, 2013 READ MORE



AP/Tara Todras-Whitehill

Reading ‘Goliath’: Inconvenient Truths

Doorstop. That’s what publishers call 400-page books like Max Blumenthal’s “Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater Israel.” But as I read it the term that came to mind was heart stopper.

Posted on Nov 5, 2013 READ MORE



Sarah Crichton Books

Thank You for Your Service

We’ve got too much war for too few warriors. David Finkel, in painful, intimate detail, examines the effects of “after war” and those victimized by egregious military malpractice.

Posted on Oct 4, 2013 READ MORE



New Press

Beyond the Shock Machine

Some 50 years after the infamous Milgram experiments, Australian psychologist Gina Perry writes, “The standard account ... suggests that ordinary people can be manipulated into behaving in ways that contradict their morals and values—that you or I could be talked into torturing a man. But could we?”

Posted on Sep 13, 2013 READ MORE



John McStravick (CC-BY)

Is College Worth It?

These four books are written in the shadow of the suspicion that the stories we tell ourselves about ourselves—concerning hard work, opportunity, meritocracy, achievement and social mobility—somehow no longer pertain.

Posted on Sep 2, 2013 READ MORE



NASA/JPL

Scatter, Adapt, and Remember

Author Annalee Newitz is convinced that humans will survive a mass extinction, “because the world has been almost completely destroyed at least half a dozen times already in Earth’s 4.5-billion-year history, and every single time there have been survivors.”

Posted on Aug 9, 2013 READ MORE



Update: ‘Sex and the Citadel’ Makes Guardian Book Award Longlist

Shereen El Feki’s first book journeys through the customs, laws, attitudes and history informing sexual life in six Arab countries.

Posted on Aug 1, 2013 READ MORE



Americanah

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s third novel compares racial hierarchies in the U.S. to social striving in her native Nigeria, with a ruthless honesty about the ugly and beautiful sides of both nations.

Posted on Jul 25, 2013 READ MORE



Better Off Without ’Em

“It’s too bad that we just didn’t let the South secede when we had the chance,” Chuck Thompson writes.

Posted on Jul 2, 2013 READ MORE



What Do Women Want?

Women are far more attracted to strangers, and far less suited to a life of staid fidelity, than the evolutionary psychologists would like us to think.

Posted on Jun 27, 2013 READ MORE



The Unwinding

This book’s vision of how things went bad over the past generation covers such diverse topics as the fast food-obesity nexus, the loss of localism, the end of cheap oil, the housing collapse and, above all, the death of trust.

Posted on Jun 13, 2013 READ MORE



Macmillan

The Race for What’s Left

It’s dire but simple: There are no longer any essential resources for economic expansion or survival that are abundant, accessible or safe to obtain.

Posted on Jun 5, 2013 READ MORE



Image via Shutterstock

Act of Congress

A new book examines the House and Senate through the evolution of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, and “Congress comes across as the nation’s grandfather: antiquated, inconsistent, as slow-moving as it is dull-witted.”

Posted on May 16, 2013 READ MORE



Daily Rituals

“Daily Rituals: How Artists Work,” which describes the routines of more than 150 creative people, including playwrights, composers, painters and writers, is a compact, quirky and frequently delightful book.

Posted on May 9, 2013 READ MORE



girlsofatomiccity.com

The Girls of Atomic City

In 1942, the U.S. government created an instant, secret city in rural Tennessee to process uranium for the world’s first atomic bomb. And Rosie, it turns out, did much more than drive rivets.

Posted on May 2, 2013 READ MORE



In-Depth Review and Analysis of the 2013 Pulitzer Winner for Fiction

Cherilyn Parsons, in her Truthdig review of “The Orphan Master’s Son,” wrote that the book, which just won the Pulitzer Prize, is “a rich, careening, dystopian tale that stretches the form of a novel to give us a visceral hit of life inside North Korea.”

Posted on Apr 16, 2013 READ MORE



The Terror Courts

The details about the courts at Guantanamo Bay have remained sketchy. Until now, as a new book explains how a small group of Bush-era political appointees developed a parallel justice system designed to ensure a specific outcome.

Posted on Apr 5, 2013 READ MORE



Digital Disconnect

“The ways capitalism works and does not work,” Robert McChesney writes in his new book, “determine the role the Internet might play in society. ... The problem is that [Internet] celebrants often believe digital technology has superpowers over political economy.”

Posted on Mar 26, 2013 READ MORE



Time of Useful Consciousness

Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s new book, “Time of Useful Consciousness,” is a fresh missive looping through the history of America from a 93-year-old Beat who has always refused to sit down.

Posted on Jan 29, 2013 READ MORE



The Balloonist

MacDonald Harris is a writer “too good to be neglected,” writes Philip Pullman in the introduction to this reissue of Harris’ highly original 1976 novel “The Balloonist.” Set in 1897, it follows a middle-aged Swedish aeronaut as he aims to sail over the Arctic in a balloon to the North Pole.

Posted on Jan 23, 2013 READ MORE



Game Over

Dave Zirin, in “Game Over: How Politics Has Turned the Sports World Upside Down,” returns to his favorite topics: race, gender, unions, the corporatization and corruption of sports, and athletes willing to speak out on any of the above.

Posted on Jan 15, 2013 READ MORE



Hallucinations

Oliver Sacks’ graceful and informative new book, “Hallucinations,” explores the surprising ways in which our brains call up simulated realities that are almost indistinguishable from normal perceptions.

Posted on Jan 8, 2013 READ MORE



A Heart of Gold

Since the founding of America, bankers have been a bit of a problem. Perhaps more so, J.R. Moehringer seems to say in his new novel “Sutton,” than the honest, hardworking bank robber.

Posted on Jan 2, 2013 READ MORE



Bin Laden of the Indian Wars

Author Robert M. Utley’s account of the elusive Geronimo is a fascinating but sometimes frustrating story.

Posted on Dec 26, 2012 READ MORE



A World Without Words

Georgina Harding’s “Painter of Silence” is a disturbing portrait of war, seen through the eyes of a deaf artist.

Posted on Dec 18, 2012 READ MORE



Image from "Economix: How and Why Our Economy Works (and Doesn't Work), in Words and Pictures"

Understanding Economics in Plain English

Fedspeak, vague and convoluted answers to economic questions, was popularized by Alan Greenspan, chairman of the Federal Reserve from 1987 to 2006. It allowed him to essentially say “no comment” without admitting that he was avoiding questions.

Posted on Dec 14, 2012 READ MORE



Fighting Manifest Destiny

“A Wicked War: Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico” is a probing and timely study of “the rise of America’s first national anti-war movement.”

Posted on Dec 11, 2012 READ MORE



Dreams of His Father

In “Stranger to History,” a memoir recounting Aatish Taseer’s travels through several predominantly Muslim countries, Pakistan emerges much worse after an attempt to “fix” it, a project that also eventually leads to the killing of the author’s father.

Posted on Dec 5, 2012 READ MORE



Restoring Personhood

“Participation in the arts is a guarantor of other human rights because the first thing that is taken away from vulnerable, unpopular, or minority groups is the right to self-expression,” Francois Matarasso says in “Acting Together, Volume II.”

Posted on Nov 20, 2012 READ MORE


Truthdig and LA Press Club
truthdig.com / lapressclub.org

Truthdig Critic Wins National Entertainment Journalism Award

Mel White took home the top prize at the L.A. Press Club’s Fifth Annual National Entertainment Journalism (NEJ) Awards in the online critic category.

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 READ MORE



Screenshot

A Raid Without the Rush

Mark Bowden’s “The Finish” reveals something you might not have known about the plan to kill Osama bin Laden: The Obama administration had considered a third option for taking out the al-Qaida leader—a sniper drone still under development.

Posted on Nov 8, 2012 READ MORE



Screenshot

Race and Class, Past and Present

Avery Arlington, the main character of the novel “Elsewhere, California,” is someone you know: the awkward, only black girl in class, the girl hanging out at the 7-Eleven magazine rack wishing she was anybody but herself, and the artist whose work makes you uncomfortable.

Posted on Oct 10, 2012 READ MORE



Book cover from McSweeney's

The Mirage of Our Lives

In Dave Eggers’ “A Hologram for the King,” an ordinary man comes to realize that managers like him who made outsourcing possible will be discarded as human refuse now that the globalization process is complete, left to wander like ghosts among the ruins.

Posted on Aug 27, 2012 READ MORE



Screenshot

Life-Defining Poetry

Maureen N. McLane’s deeply personal and eccentric “My Poets” is a meditation on the works that have “most marked” her by Chaucer, Gertrude Stein, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, Emily Dickinson, Shelley and Louise Gluck.

Posted on Aug 21, 2012 READ MORE



Screenshot

Reagan and Hoover, Sittin’ in a Tree

“Subversives” shows how the two men and their allies sabotaged the careers of law-abiding citizens, defended reckless police violence and exploited an appalling double standard in the political use of FBI intelligence.

Posted on Aug 14, 2012 READ MORE



AP/Marcio Jose Sanchez

From a Refugee Camp to the Olympics

Lopez Lomong had never heard of the games when he tagged along with friends in Kenya to watch the 2000 Sydney races on a grainy, black-and-white TV powered by a car battery. Now, he’ll run the 5,000-meter for the U.S. in London.

Posted on Aug 7, 2012 READ MORE



Screenshot

The Courage of Conscience

“Beautiful Souls: Saying No, Breaking Ranks, and Heeding the Voice of Conscience in Dark Times” tells the stories of unlikely dissenters who were not radicals, but rather ordinary people compelled to act when the system they believed in went terribly wrong.

Posted on Jul 31, 2012 READ MORE



The Righteous Road to Ruin

Jonathan Haidt, who believes we are hard-wired to be selfish, mistakes conformity and obedience to authority for the moral life in his new book, “The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion.”

Posted on Jun 28, 2012 READ MORE



Screenshot

How to Build a Quagmire

If you’re wondering how $31 billion of U.S. taxpayer money could be lost to fraud and waste in Afghanistan and Iraq, “Funding the Enemy: How U.S. Taxpayers Bankroll the Taliban” by Douglas A. Wissing is for you.

Posted on Jun 21, 2012 READ MORE



U.S. Embassy New Delhi

Canadian Gothic

After reading Richard Ford’s “Canada,” you will never hear about a convicted criminal without considering the invisible children whose lives have been scrambled in ways they can’t possibly understand.

Posted on Jun 14, 2012 READ MORE



Screenshot

Ain’t It Funky

When Bootsy Collins defected from James Brown’s band for George Clinton’s, RJ Smith, in his new biography of Brown, gives us the desertion from Brown’s point of view: “You could not copyright a beat, a smell, the One. You made it and then a younger man in an ass-length blond wig marked it up and made it new.”

Posted on Jun 7, 2012 READ MORE



I Can’t Hear Myself Think

In “Republic of Noise: The Loss of Solitude in Schools and Culture,” Diana Senechal argues that the omnipresence of computers, tablets and smartphones hampers our ability to commune not just with one another, but with ourselves.

Posted on May 25, 2012 READ MORE



screenshot

Better Than We Found It

“Better Than We Found It” explains dozens of complex and entrenched issues that plague today’s world and applies a thoughtful and straightforward approach to problem solving.

Posted on May 21, 2012 READ MORE



A Beast Bent on Grace

In Jack Gilbert’s poetry, the mythic anguish of Orpheus in the underworld suddenly seems fused with something very much like the room in which you sit.

Posted on May 17, 2012 READ MORE



Jon Rawlinson (CC-BY)

Not Only Slavery, but AIDS Too

Craig Timberg and Daniel Halperin suggest in their new book, “Tinderbox,” that colonialists’ aggressive trade practices opened new travel routes in central Africa that helped spread a disease rooted in a dense forest to the world beyond.

Posted on Apr 19, 2012 READ MORE



Why Is the Measure of Love Loss?

“When my mother was angry with me, which was often,” writes Jeanette Winterson in her new memoir “Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?,” “she said, ‘The devil led us to the wrong crib.’ ”

Posted on Mar 29, 2012 READ MORE



Decade of the Living Dead

“Zombie Banks: How Broken Banks and Debtor Nations Are Crippling the Global Economy” is a grisly and horrifying true story of bloodsucking, flesh-eating, life-destroying fiends.

Posted on Mar 15, 2012 READ MORE



‘Midnight’ and the Meaning of Trust

Fiction is supposed to provide escape. Action/adventure romances are written for youthful readers and the young at heart, but Sister Souljah makes several choices as an author in her new novel, “Midnight and the Meaning of Love,” that make it difficult to trust her.

Posted on Jul 14, 2011 READ MORE


View older articles:  1 2 >

View the most popular tags overall?

 
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 

A Progressive Journal of News and Opinion   Publisher, Zuade Kaufman   Editor, Robert Scheer
© 2014 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.