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A Satire: Serving the Nation, Republican-Style

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Posted on Aug 8, 2011
Flickr / DonkeyHotey (CC-BY)

House Republicans: Majority Leader Eric Cantor (left), Speaker John Boehner and Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy.

By Fred Branfman

(Page 3)

This was obviously inexcusable since it meant that employers were deprived of the many young girls who, after undergoing costly training and building up valuable job experience, were lost to the household servant labor market forever.

“But this bill, by providing added incentives for small businesses to establish household servant leasing companies, will solve this problem,” Cantor said. “The contract signed by leased female servants will stipulate that, if impregnated by their employer, his sons or other relatives or friends, they will continue in service with another family up to the day they give birth, immediately give up the infant for adoption and return to service almost right away.”

Cantor also predicted that this approach would open up other “exciting possibilities” for small-business entrepreneurs. “We have already had discussions with a number of adoption agencies and orphanages about establishing a `cradle-to-grave career path’ for the many illegitimate children who will be given up for adoption, and other orphans,” he said. “They say that children trained from birth to obey, present a pleasant and upbeat appearance, and not only instantly respond to but anticipate their employers’ requests, will obviously be able to fetch top dollar in this growing market.”

Cantor also waxed enthusiastic about the potential for reaching global markets, and thus improving America’s balance of trade. “Businessmen with whom we have discussed this are extremely optimistic about the opportunities for penetrating upscale markets abroad, such as China, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia,” he said. “Our market research indicates that wealthy foreign elites see employing an American as a servant—or even better, adopting an American child for a lifetime of household service—as one of the ultimate status symbols. Maybe a GM car is no longer a status brand for members of princely Saudi families, but who says America can’t come back? The profit potential from these made-in-the-USA exports is truly awe inspiring.”

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In response to questions from other journalists, Cantor emphasized that household servitude would offer millions of young Americans opportunities to earn “decent money.” “Our discussions with potential employers indicate that they may well pay slightly above the minimum wage since they will be able to write off most of their employees’ salaries if they hire American,” the congressman said. “And thrifty and hardworking employees will have many other opportunities to supplement their income. They will enjoy free lodging in the servants’ quarters, free food left over from their employers’ meals and access to their employers’ surplus clothing.”

He added that those servants able to sing, dance, play music or otherwise entertain their employers and their guests would in many cases also be able to earn significant tips. He also noted that they would probably save most of their earnings because they would be on call to meet their employers’ needs at least six and a half days a week, and thus would have little opportunity to waste their money on frivolous pursuits. “An enterprising and frugal young person entering household service after high school or college should be easily able to save up enough money to marry another equally frugal member of the servant class by their mid to late 30s,” Cantor told reporters.

Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein, under fire for helping cause the crash of 2008, took the unusual step of appearing at the news conference. “I am here today to represent employers, who strongly support this legislation,” he began. “After years of being unfairly attacked for exporting U.S. capital abroad, our support for this bill clearly demonstrates that both the executives in my company and the entire financial sector are committed to creating stable jobs for American citizens right here at home.”

Like Cantor and Boehner, Blankfein stressed that household employment would be a growing sector for years to come. “It is not only senior executives like myself who have a growing need for servants as our bonuses grow and we purchase new and larger residences and yachts,” Blankfein said. “I, for example, have two married children who recently graduated college and are starting life on their own. They too will soon be looking for nannies, chauffeurs and gardeners. Why, I estimate that as a result of this bill within five years my family alone will provide decent jobs for more than 200 Americans. And I want to emphasize that I and other successful people welcome this opportunity to ‘give back’ to America for all it has done for us!”

Blankfein added that “I also hope this will stop once and for all the scurrilous attack on Wall Street for paying its executives ever-greater bonuses regardless of company performance. By using our bonuses to employ Americans, we will be clearly creating far more jobs than those who would increase our taxes to pay for government programs that create a culture of dependence.”


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By ardee, August 13, 2011 at 5:52 pm Link to this comment

Leefeller, August 13 at 9:58 am Link to this comment

RD, far as I can tell, nobody on this thread said anything about RD or the green party in an insulting way?  Name calling seems out of place, unless it is used to detract from the discussion.

On this particular thread you are correct. But you have yet to state what it was about that post of mine you found to be out of line, even after I reproduced it for you. Why is that?

RD, from what I see many people are disenfranchised by Obama, you seem to ignore these points as agreement in preference of continuing past disagreements and apparently some sort of oneupsmanship and never attempting to resolve any past differences or discretion’s instead of reaching for common ground or agreements.

You are, of course, entitled to your opinion, and I would like to think I played a small part in finally getting more than cryptic one liners from one rather capable of so much more.

As to those who are “disappointed” with our president, it is not those many to whom I turn my attention, but to those few who post a few obvious criticisms and then react with sarcasm and sometimes even anger at any suggestion that voting for either major party is a mistake.

I find empty the blind loyalty and ask, time and again, for their own suggestions as to how to turn the course of that party back to what it once was but has not been for quite some time. Never once has any such response been forthcoming. Instead, in at least one posters responses we get a hateful and stridently incorrect assumption of some failure of third party politics because one particular party fails to keep some mythic schedule of another such party in a nation that already has several such parties. (Not in this particular thread of course but I include this as an example of what you seem hell bent to deny, for reasons perhaps of friendship or misplaced loyalty?)


Once again I would thank you for at least coming out of your shell for us all. I have always known you were capable of more than you offered.

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By Leefeller, August 13, 2011 at 9:58 am Link to this comment

RD, far as I can tell, nobody on this thread said anything about RD or the green party in an insulting way?  Name calling seems out of place, unless it is used to detract from the discussion.

Appearing as an obsessive compulsive, does not win an argument or open discussion. Many people seem unable to disagree with respect and in some cases agree with respect? Not sure why, but I am working on it. 

RD, from what I see many people are disenfranchised by Obama, you seem to ignore these points as agreement in preference of continuing past disagreements and apparently some sort of oneupsmanship and never attempting to resolve any past differences or discretion’s instead of reaching for common ground or agreements.

Divisive bickering appears to me, only what it is and has nothing to do with subject, in search of facts or resolve nor does it support any attempt towards agreement or resove.

We have real problems in this country, so spending time polarizing instead of working on resolutions and agreements seems such a waste of time.  I would say most readers and posters here do not care who started what, who insulted who and especially here on this thread why would anyone want to read bout happened yesteryear?  Sure I have had my differences, I just do not carry them on my sleeve.

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By ardee, August 12, 2011 at 4:48 pm Link to this comment

Leefeller, August 12 at 8:37 am

Do you refer to this comment, my last one in fact?

Gee, I guess the three quarters of a billion dollars Obama raised to buy the presidency, and the estimated one billion he will acquire to win a second term all came from our fifty buck contributions instead of the same corporate checkbooks that fed the GOP too.

Clumsy effort to continue to blame only one half of the Duopoly Party that runs our government.

I think the point is obvious,why don’t you?

Further I think that those who use such a trite and pointless canard as calling someone who posts truthful and valid criticisms of the Party she holds so dear, as a “troll” or “republican agent” shows plainly her worthlessness, immaturity too. But it shows even more that she hasn’t a case to be made at all. Speaking of cases, why is it that neither, ever, not once, puts forth a plan to turn their beloved party from its losing course?

Just as her fellow loyalist, the Ill Wind, ignored a series of posts that stated quite succinctly why I opine as I do about the Democratic Party’s uselessness in the struggle to regain our governance from the corporatists that pollute it now.

Just as his ridiculous and rather childish defamation of the Green Party was meant, not as political discussion, but as a stupid attempt to
insult me personally. As if, what a buffoon he makes himself out to be. Especially as I took the pains to show the difference between German politics with its multi-party structure and the restrictive two party system we labor under.

In short, Leefeller, I debate as I am debated. I do not choose to turn the other cheek, and when the two usual suspects attempt to turn honest debate into school yard buffoonery I am quite willing to follow them down that road. A failing, perhaps, but odd that you reserve your criticisms for me without mention of the lines the Ill Wind crosses so willingly.

They both see any critique of their party, however truthful it may be, as an insult. Their problem not mine.

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By Leefeller, August 12, 2011 at 8:37 am Link to this comment

The line between satire and reality is non definable when addressing the Republicans and Tea Party they are so out of touch with reality and main street in DC.

Republican clearly unhidden contempt for the working class for the poor and minorities, shows the Republicans as drag queens for the wealthy and corporations who are dressed as people too!

Ardee, what is the point of your last comment,... except to insult? Contentious comments only polarize and resolve nothing.  Far as I can tell, your last comment is personal bias, and stuffed full of divisive conjecture, to my disappointment and seemingly even as pathetic!

Come on Ardee, make a point!

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By Shenonymous, August 11, 2011 at 6:19 am Link to this comment

I am extremely unhappy with the performance of Barack Obama
as President and I’ve said as much about most of the Democrats
in office,  but as acute as my disappointment is, it is nothing
compared to what can be expected were a Republican be elected
president.  If there were a Democratic or a Progressive Independent
challenger to Obama who could win the 2012 election, I would vote
for him/her. 

It is repellent to even think what this country would be like if a
Republican were to become president.  I see no one on the horizon
who would challenge Obama.  Criticize the Democrats, and I do
profusely, criticize me, which a few do obsessively, but the alternative
to having a Republican president is dreadful to even think about.  The
working class of this country will be pushed into a hole so deep they
might never be able to pull themselves even halfway out.  And the poor
might as well go jump off bridges en mass, bridges that are falling down
by the way and not in London, right here.

The Republican Party is the Party Against the People.

      The Ten Commandments of the Republican Party
1.  The Republicans want to privatize Social Security .
2.  The Republicans want to destroy Medicare and make low income
people and seniors to pay for their own medical care.  The Republican
rich can afford their own health care.
3.  The Republicans want to terminate Medicaid thereby leaving the poor
to the catastrophe of illness.
4.  The Republicans want to enlarge corporations and pharmaceutical
companies’ profits, and exempt them from having to pay any or only
token taxes.  The Republicans want to tax the poor.
5.  The Republicans want to take away women’s right to their own
bodies.
6.  The Republicans want to ban the right to vote for the elderly,
immigrants, and college students, thereby reducing the liberal sector’s
voting pool.
7.  The Republicans want to dictate what you believe about religion and
dictate that school textbooks include unscientific doctrines lacking
validity and authenticity.
8.  The Republicans want to take your money and give it to Wall Street,
financial corporations, the banks and credit card companies and provide
the financial world shelter from any equitable redistribution.
9.  The Republicans want remove the protections unions have provided
the working class and allow hazardous working conditions, keeping
wages below equitable levels, and deny health and retirement benefits
while the employers make record profits even in a time of fiscal
destitution for millions of Americans. 
10. The Republicans want to destroy the Clean Air Act and Clean Water
Act to allow the corporations to pollute the land and water and ravage
the land and resources, and wild life that keeps the physical continent
healthy.

My effort might be clumsy, it isn’t, where yours on behalf of the people
is nonexistent.  This leads one to believe you are a shill for the
Republicans.

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By ardee, August 11, 2011 at 2:30 am Link to this comment

The propaganda continues:

“The other pack of gods is the god of the rich and evidently more powerful that is bed buddies with the corporate world, the Republican Party.”

Gee, I guess the three quarters of a billion dollars Obama raised to buy the presidency, and the estimated one billion he will acquire to win a second term all came from our fifty buck contributions instead of the same corporate checkbooks that fed the GOP too.

Clumsy effort to continue to blame only one half of the Duopoly Party that runs our government.

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By Angel Gabriel, August 10, 2011 at 5:23 pm Link to this comment

Is it Satire, or is it Memorex!?

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By omop, August 10, 2011 at 4:35 pm Link to this comment

Lets be fair to Eric the money man. He is counting on the 46 million or
so Americans on food stamps to hire butlers, maids and returning
military from Iraq and Afghanistan and other locales.

The salaries paid those “native born” citizens will have tremendous
impact on the several trillion dollar debt of the USA and according to
Eric’s interview in the NYT there will be no more need for either Social
Security and or Medicare for older citizens but he will defend to the
bitter end any cuts to aid to beleagered economically Israel.

For his part he will hire several “native born” Americans to do chores
he otherwise would be doing instead of aping John Keynes.

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By Marian Griffith, August 10, 2011 at 3:05 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

@I.B.Tinken
—-Even the football riots might be traced back to similar causes—a working class that has been gradually made redundant with the closure of mines and factories across England.  For decades many men have been idled with nothing important to do and none of the self esteem that came from their work. They were given the dole to feed their families, but nothing to provide a sense of purpose or investment in the future.  Hence they have little to lose if they riot, loot and go to jail—-

While you are not entirely wrong in your analysis, here you slip. Most research shows that the majority of the football hooligans, and most certainly the leaders who organise the violence, are middle class (or close to it) and many are married and have children. Their hobby, instead of fishing or watching a match, is to organise violent clashes with other hooligans, the police and random passers by.

Much the same is happening with these riots. There certainly is a (large) amount of resentment for how the world changed around them, but this is more an excuse than a source for the outburst. At its simplest the problem is ‘too much testosterone and too much street culture’. They started by removing themselves from the society they come to resent, because it was ‘cooler’ to hang out with other young men on the street and drop out of school.

There certainly is an undercurrent of discrimination in the UK also (as there is in any country with mixed ethnic or social groups). But these young men made themselves a very easy target for discrimination. Notice how the young -women- from the same ethnic and social groups have far less problems, simply because they stay within the system and work hard to get the qualifications needed for a career.
Exactly the same pattern can be seen in the Netherlands with the young Moroccan men dropping out of school far more frequently, having a criminal record (or at least a long list of marks against them in police files) and hang out on the street or in clubs all day not achieving very much, while their sisters, who are often still very much oppressed (reactionary islamic style), not only go to school, but finish with good grades and go on to university degrees because they know that this is how they can create a life of their own instead of being a mindless slave of their fathers.
And I would be very surprised if statistics do not show that young black women do considerably better in all aspects than young black men.
In fact, I expect that statistics show that -women- are increasingly doing better than -men-.
The transition from a male dominated society to a more equal one is not kind on men who are still in the old ‘men are superior in all ways and women should obey them unquestioningly’ mindset with one foot and in the modern ‘the boss is superior in all ways and the working drones must obey unquestioningly’ mindset in the other.

That, or women are more disciplined and less ruled by their hormones than young men (who hang out in big groups and do stupid, frequently violent, things to impress each other and establish a pecking order.

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By bigjohn756, August 10, 2011 at 11:59 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Oh, no, now I have to replace my entire staff. And
since they will all need to be WASPs, they’ll want a
lot more money. Next thing you know the government will
want me to pay my fair share of taxes.

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By Inherit The Wind, August 10, 2011 at 11:46 am Link to this comment

The idea that native-born Americans have rights not accorded to naturalized Americans is not satirical or funny. It is the fundamentally racist core of the TeaParty and much of the GOP. 

Hell, even native-born Americans aren’t good enough for these bastards when they refer to them as “anchor babies” and want to rescind their right to citizenship under the 14th Amendment. 

Of course, nobody conjures up an image of an anchor baby with Caucasian parents, only with Hispanic, African/Caribbean or Asian parents…ie, babies that are Not White. Nobody ever bitches about Russians or Slovenians or Romanians coming here and having an “anchor baby” so they can’t be thrown out.  Nobody talks about stripping THOSE children of their citizenship. How racist is that? Very.

There is only one right accorded to native-born Americans that is not extended to naturalized Americans: The right to hold the Presidency or Vice-Presidency.

In all other things the Law and the Constitution make no differentiation.

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By Athirson, August 10, 2011 at 10:04 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

There was nothing, absolutely nothing, in that article
that would have led me to believe it was intended as
satire.

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Shenonymous's avatar

By Shenonymous, August 10, 2011 at 9:03 am Link to this comment

There is a battle of the gods going on.  One minor god
is battling the collective pantheon of all the other gods. 
The small god is the god of the people, call it any non-
Republican party you want.  The other pack of gods is the
god of the rich and evidently more powerful that is bed
buddies with the corporate world, the Republican Party.

The bulging swarm of supergods deliberately lie and
intentionally deceive the population so that they may retain
their power and wealth.  They have no other reasons on
which they stand.  They keep it simple for stupids.

The fact of life now is that money absolutely determines and
shapes the way we live and the way we act towards one another. 
But it isn’t money that is the problem.  For it is because of
money that life expectancy, literacy, education in general, and
welfare in general has improved throughout the world and also
in America.  It is the means but not the only means by which the
struggle between the people and the wealthy can be evened out
and the people have the wherewithal to fight.  But they need to
accumulate the money, whereas the rich already have it.  How to
even the playing field is the biggest challenge for the people. 

Consumption might be the road to perdition, but it is the road on
which nearly everyone is walking, some running.  There is more
wealth in the world than anyone can dream of.  It is beyond
comprehension.  If humans want to have a decent world, all the
humans need to be considered as equal in their humanhood.  The
Republicans do not see all humans as equal.  Serving the nation for
the Republicans means serving themselves and all they represent,
wealth and power.  We can theorize all we want and it is a pleasant
pastime but it does not address our reality which is always in the
now.  People are starving for work right now, people are in need of
health care right now, people are in need of decent living quarters
right now.  Not only do the Republicans not care about the right now,
they do not care about the American people and prostitute the idea
of The American People for their selfish causes.  It is time to take their
whoring of the American People away, permanently.

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By A Green Road, August 10, 2011 at 7:34 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

London’s burning from riots. What can we learn from
them? Initially at least, the riots were caused when a
black man was shot by police. That first surge of
violence has turned into random mayhem, which
continues. To read more go to….

http://www.care2.com/c2c/share/detail/2900642

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By mrfreeze, August 9, 2011 at 9:32 pm Link to this comment

Bacilo de Koch - My point was (as I. B. Tinken so kindly reiterated) about the way the Media spins this and all other issues: It’s always about “business.” One would think that labour was merely an afterthought to all this economic activity going on in the world.

I abhor violence. These riots in England are a terrible thing. I never said they weren’t. I’ll stand by what I wrote: If the Media spent more time reporting about the everyday plight of working, poor and marginalized people, rather than focusing constantly on what “businessmen” think, perhaps it wouldn’t have come to this.

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By I. B. Tinken, August 9, 2011 at 5:48 pm Link to this comment

Mr. Zenbowman asks why domestic employment should be considered less worthy than any other employment.  Then he states:
“I grew up in a country where domestic employment is a
lifeline for many people who would otherwise be
forced into prostitution and crime, and I assure you
they are quite human and have their own dignity.”

Some would assert that prostitutes have the same right to respect dignity as domestic servant—or nurses, reporters, lawyers or politicians, for that matter. But we seem to make jokes about prostitutes, don’t we.  In fact I don’t see much difference between them and many lawyers and politicians. Yet I can see the opportunities for satire in references to prostitution, while also cognisant that many prostitutes are abused and murdered for merely trying to survive.

And frankly, when domestic servants get paid like other service providers—nurses etc.—then they will be less of a target of satire.  Until then, perhaps we can lighten up.  Even doctors are the occasional subject of humor and ridicule.

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By ZenBowman, August 9, 2011 at 5:25 pm Link to this comment

What a disgraceful article, why are domestic workers
considered any lower than anyone else and singled out
as a source of humor? This is the kind of leftist
bigotry that should simply be considered
unacceptable.

I grew up in a country where domestic employment is a
lifeline for many people who would otherwise be
forced into prostitution and crime, and I assure you
they are quite human and have their own dignity.
Instead of mocking domestic employment, perhaps you
should focus on the abuse of domestic workers that is
increasingly common in the countries like Saudi
Arabia and Indonesia.

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By I. B. Tinken, August 9, 2011 at 5:15 pm Link to this comment

Bacilo, My understanding of mrfreeze’s point is that the MS media is focused on the “bad apples” explanation for this societal breakdown, not that shop keepers don’t deserve any sympathy.  But in the mainstream media the shop keeper is presented as the only “victim”.  There seems to be far less consideration of the many victims of government cutting social services to the poor and unemployed. (although covered in some reports I’ve seen)

Certainly the “thugs” have something to do with the riots just as they do with the riots after British football matches.  But these football riots which start with drunken football fans high on adrenalin, seem to dissipate after a few cars are overturned and windows smashed. They don’t go on for days and set fires in cities across the country. This only happens when the sense of grievance is deep and widespread.

Even the football riots might be traced back to similar causes—a working class that has been gradually made redundant with the closure of mines and factories across England.  For decades many men have been idled with nothing important to do and none of the self esteem that came from their work. They were given the dole to feed their families, but nothing to provide a sense of purpose or investment in the future.  Hence they have little to lose if they riot, loot and go to jail.

There are sociological studies to support my analysis, but a much more accessible picture is presented in the film “The Full Monty” where unemployed steel workers respond to their declining status and lack of economic future by becoming male strippers.  Certainly preferable to rioting, but then not everyone is so creative or bold.

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By Bacilo de Koch, August 9, 2011 at 4:25 pm Link to this comment

mrfreeze:

You must be joking?

Please do not confuse the shopkeeper of a small store in a crappy part of
London with the banks and corporations that caused the financial meltdown
which have done so much harm and have caused anger.

And also, please do not confuse a bunch of thugs and thieves with a justifiably
angry middle class.

If you work for a living, then you are in business one way or another.  If the
breaking of some shop windows causes an increase of insurance premiums,
then the ultimate beneficiary will be the insurance company.  Lets be upset with
said insurance company, yes, but should we not be more upset with the thugs
that broke the window in the first place?  Certainly not with the owner of the
store.

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By mrfreeze, August 9, 2011 at 4:17 pm Link to this comment

I. B. Tinken - Your comment is so very interesting because this afternoon on NPR’s “The World” the program was focusing on the wherefores and why’s of the riots, the anger, the destruction, etc….What I found so interesting was the “spin” regarding how all the businesses were being hurt by the actions of those “few bad apples,” and how “business” was being negatively affected….They had one shop owner talk about how hard he works and how the looting will make his life tougher…there was even talk about insurance rates going up…............I’m not justifying this particular violent uprising (although there are obvious, deep-seated issues in that area). I just find it interesting how the Media (presumably a liberal media) will basically take the side of business and commerce rather than spend more time digging into the disparity, the inequality and cultural problems that caused the riots. BUT of course, it’s always about business right?

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By Bacilo de Koch, August 9, 2011 at 3:12 pm Link to this comment

Scary thing is:

Even with the word ‘Satire’ in the title, it took me a while to find the satire.  I was
well into the first page before I found something out of character with Cantor

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By I. B. Tinken, August 9, 2011 at 2:16 pm Link to this comment

Although the British have far more experience with the servant class, and have exported such interesting portrayals as the NPR program “Upstairs Downstairs”, The recent news from Britain would seem to suggest that when the servant class gets squeezed hard enough they don’t look for a new household to serve, but instead burn down their cities, necessitating the exponential expansion of the police force.

Of course the police are also called “public servants” and happily serve the ruling class so long as they get their pay, perks, and pensions.  But as the ruling class dismantle the public “servant” unions and reduce the public sector to the minimum wages offered the private sector “servant class”, I would expect the police and firefighters to join the rioters—or at least call in sick.

So, note to the jet setting ruling class: the Proms and Theatre scene in London are not nearly so much fun when the Albert Hall and South Bank are choked with smoke or soon to be engulfed in flames. Nor will it be any more fun in New York, Washington or the South of France, when the servant class has finally had enough and refuses to go back to the 19th century poor house or 13th century Feudalism.

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By gurjeet751, August 9, 2011 at 11:12 am Link to this comment

KewL…

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By Marian Griffith, August 9, 2011 at 10:13 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

@falken751
It is satire, but like all good satire it bites more than it evokes a laugh.

(and how appropriate: the captcha is million88 ...)

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By degrene, August 9, 2011 at 8:41 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

I have said for years—since the Reagan Era—that the Republicans will not be satisfied until we return to the 18th Century where Landlords and propertied Masters have the power to do anything they want and the rest of us are mere property—the “human resources” we are today—for their benefit.  Carnegie said it in the 1950s—“By the year 2000, we will control everything.”—he was right and it will get worse until the people of this country actually take the power away from them—hopefully by vote rather than another way.

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By StephenS777, August 9, 2011 at 7:51 am Link to this comment

Good article, but…

1) It’s never “Democratic.” When a good Republican refers to a member of the other party, he always uses the “Obnoxious Singular,” “Democrat.”

2) A Reporter (often now called “Repeater”) would never “challenge” Cantor but would ask for “clarification.”

3) You need at least on high-ranking “Democrat” (liberal, bastard) in here offering obsequious praise. in the spirit of bipartisanship, for this wonderful legislation

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By falken751, August 9, 2011 at 5:59 am Link to this comment

Tell me this is a joke, although I wouldn’t
put it past republicans.

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sand11's avatar

By sand11, August 9, 2011 at 4:56 am Link to this comment

Brilliant…..and devastating!

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By ardee, August 9, 2011 at 4:32 am Link to this comment

This obvious satire is a worthy addition to those portrayed by The Onion and other such bastions of humorous political commentary we now find in such quantities.

What? ,Say what? Not satire you say? Impossible I say, especially in the land of the free and the home of the brave.

;-}

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