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Where We’re Going, We Don’t Need New Roads

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Posted on Apr 5, 2012

By David Sirota

Interstate 70 in Colorado, one of the nation’s best-known arteries, is the latest thoroughfare to incite an archetypal fight. Running at capacity as it cuts through Denver, this gateway to the Rocky Mountains is about to be expanded over the objections of residents whose low-income neighborhoods will be sliced apart.

No doubt, the road will probably win—as roads almost always do in these battles. Indeed, the story of I-70 summarizes the 60-year tale of urban development in modern America: Instead of beefing up public transit, cities build neighborhood-destroying highways, cars fill up those highways, cities then build more highways to alleviate traffic, and then yet more cars flood the roads, creating even more traffic. Known as the “fundamental law of highway congestion,” this cycle perfectly embodies the “If you build it, cars will come” axiom confirmed in 2011 by researchers at the University of Toronto.

In the past, of course, road fetishists could claim that such catch-22’s aside, our nation is inherently reliant on cars, and that adding roads—any roads—is intrinsically worthwhile. This, in fact, is the assumption woven into the bipartisan federal stimulus bill and President Obama’s new budget, both of which target transportation dollars to building roads. Those new highways may not reduce congestion, energy consumption or pollution, but they will enrich an array of powerful interests, including automakers, fossil fuel companies, trucking firms and road contractors. And so they are repackaged as cure-alls by politicians in our money-dominated democracy.

But what happens when America suddenly tones down its love affair with the automobile? At that point, could we still justify destroying neighborhoods to make room for bigger roads? Could we still pretend that more roads are truly necessary? Could we still overlook the fact that road construction creates fewer jobs than public transit projects? In short, could we still ignore all the contradictions and problems that accompany our road fetish?

The United States is a nation whose car romance presents itself in everything from high-minded literature (“On the Road”) to middle-brow music (“Paradise By the Dashboard Light”) to low-brow films (“Road Trip”)—and all the SUV commercials in between. Pondering a less car-dependent society may therefore seem like an academic exercise. But it’s a more relevant endeavor than you might think.

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Under the headline “Driving is a Dying Activity in America,” Business Insider recently highlighted data showing that Americans are putting fewer miles on their cars than at any time since 1999. USA Today notes that this stunning decrease is a product of “factors ranging from the weak economy to high gas prices to aging boomers and teens driving less.”

That last trend is the most significant, because it’s not just about frugal parents momentarily prohibiting kids from driving during an oil-price spike. It’s also about young people’s preferences. As the New York Times just reported, “Many young consumers today just do not care that much about cars,” as evidenced by an 18 percent drop in teen drivers licenses between 1998 and 2008. A generation ago, Ferris Bueller said that getting a computer instead of a car proved that he was “born under a bad sign”—but the Times cites a new poll showing 46 percent of today’s 18- to 24-year-olds say they would actually “choose Internet access over owning a car.”

Taken together, these attitudinal shifts present a welcome opportunity to change everything from environmentally destructive infrastructure policies to outdated corporate investment strategies. Seizing such a rare opportunity requires only that more of us spend a bit less time in the car when possible. That, or at least an end to a political theology that always presents new roads as a panacea.


David Sirota is a best-selling author of the new book “Back to Our Future: How the 1980s Explain the World We Live In Now.” He hosts the morning show on AM760 in Colorado. E-mail him at ds@davidsirota.com, follow him on Twitter @davidsirota or visit his website at www.davidsirota.com.

© 2012 Creators.com


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By Salome, April 10, 2012 at 5:34 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

I am particularly disappointed that Joe Biden hasn’t vociferously championed Amtrak.  Amtrak helped him greatly in his hour of need, I think it would be immoral for him to leave office without having helped Amtrak get its own rails (so it doesn’t have to wait behind freight which has the right of way), new cars, and a bigger operating budget.

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By christian96, April 9, 2012 at 10:26 pm Link to this comment

IT WILL HAPPEN WHEN THE SUN BURSTS GROW MASSIVE! LIGHTS
OUT EARTH!  GREAT TRIBULATION!

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By moonraven, April 9, 2012 at 10:07 am Link to this comment

prose:  It WILL happen—it’s just a question of when.

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By prosefights, April 8, 2012 at 7:28 pm Link to this comment

When the grid goes down, you folks won’t last a week.

May happen?

Tuesday April 3, 2012 06:00

The US produces only 7% of the uranium it consumes, Byron King reported.

Written material has the problem that it is written by authors. And they cannot be trusted. Especially MSM.

Five new generators are on track for completion this decade, including two reactors approved just a few weeks ago (the first new reactor approvals in the US in over 30 years). Those will add to the 104 reactors that are already in operation around the country and already produce 20% of the nation’s power.
Those reactors will eat up 19,724 tonnes of U3O8 this year, which represents 29% of global uranium demand. If that seems like a large amount, it is! The US produces more nuclear power than any other country on earth, which means it consumes more uranium that any other nation. However, decades of declining domestic production have left the US producing only 4% of the world’s uranium.

With so little homegrown uranium, the United States has to import more than 80% of the uranium it needs to fuel its reactors. Thankfully, for 18 years a deal with Russia has filled that gap. The “Megatons to Megawatts” agreement, whereby Russia downblends highly enriched uranium from nuclear warheads to create reactor fuel, has provided the US with a steady, inexpensive source of uranium since 1993. The problem is that the program is coming to an end next year.

The Upside to a Natural Gas Downturn
Marin Katusa, for The Daily Reckoning
Monday April 2, 2012

Or may not, Albert Gore willing, of course.

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By John Poole, April 8, 2012 at 12:33 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Listen up assholes! The car is our demise!  Aliens will
visit the planet perhaps in millions of years and find
a planet of rusted hulks and no humans. We are
incapable of severing the pathetic love relationship
with the hoxic conveyance called the automobile. It is
as if an alien race created us for video amusement and
the game reset button was our need for fossil fuel
based mobility.
Deal with it.

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By moonraven, April 8, 2012 at 9:43 am Link to this comment

gerard:

Cormac McCarthy wrote The Road because he saw where
we were headed.

When I see silly comments like Turn off you AC for a
week and use public transportation, I know that we
are doomed.

I dumped my car 13 years ago (and it was a VW Beetle)
and have been taking public transportation since
then.  AC?  Don’t kid me—even in Bahrain with 110
degrees I opened the windows instead of running AC.

When the grid goes down, you folks won’t last a week.

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By Ed Romano, April 7, 2012 at 1:03 pm Link to this comment

Clogged roads, air pollution, oil wars…Like almost all of our other major problems - these can be laid at the door of capitalism. After WW2 General Motors formed a corporation to buy up and destroy street car companies all over the nation. In the city I live in
the street car tracks are buried under hot top. Thousands of cable cars were burned. As far back as 1912 you could take street cars all the way from New York City to Boston and beyond simply by getting off at the city limits of one town and getting onto a connecting street car at the border of the next.
When factories were built in those days they were built in the city or very nearby. This enabled the work force to either walk to work of take a street car. Once the system was destroyed an automobile became a necessity The auto companies then had Washington begin building the massive road system that prevails today enabling companies to build facilities in the boonies. 
  A healthy rail system, perhaps like the mono rails that exist in other industrial nations, has seemed an obvious need now for some time. Why isn’t it on the boards, or even publicly discussed ? Can the answer be any more obvious ?
  A similar situation exists in the illegal drug industry. Instead of leagalizing drugs so that the government might control the industry and gain some revenues from it…we have spent billions , and possibly trillions, trying to stop the importation of drugs into this country. And the more we spend the more drugs get into the US.,.... with billions of dollars exiting the country each year to places like Mexico and Columbia….Do you ever get the feeling that you landed on the wrong planet ?????????

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By John Poole, April 7, 2012 at 6:30 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Today’s car is an ingenious invention for mobility
empowerment, status and sybaritic indulgence for
Americans. It might be the invention that dooms us if
we can’t wean ourselves from it’s allure. 

.

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By BlueNeck, April 6, 2012 at 10:31 pm Link to this comment

After your discussing this problem on your radio show, David, writing it in an article is great so that others can read about it and, I hope, discuss it with others.

We really need to think differently about cars and roads as we move into a new energy future. Neither are going to go away, at least until we can say, “Beam me to work, Scotty.”

What concerns me is the sprawl that coincides with new roads being built. Does anybody else feel a little sad that malls and strip malls built just 15 or 20 years ago are being emptied because the retailer-tenants are moving just a few miles away to a new and bigger mall or strip mall.

Plus they are given “incentives” like tax increment financing where sales taxes go to the retailer instead of cash-strapped state treasuries. Also, taxpayers pay for widening existing roads and installing new traffic lights or altogether building new roads that lead to those malls too.

Are the benefits greater than the costs as far as the average taxpayer is concerned? There are small businesses that benefit on the periphery of the development. There are some new jobs, although the long-term jobs are generally low paying and without benefits. Then there is the impact of clearing green space for concrete, plus runoff, and more traffic.

My apologies are genuinely extended to those who really adore shopping and going to the new malls with great anticipation. Even though your excitement is lost on me, I get a kick out of watching and listening to others who routinely go to the mall. It’s a social and cultural event that gives meaning to their lives. These few little rain drops of protestations about unnecessary development won’t ruin your grand-opening parade.

And technology may not be the only impetus for transportation changes. Transportation is about movement. I like to think about the very freedom to move about without papers or permission. I’m grateful for those liberties.

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By prosefights, April 6, 2012 at 7:05 pm Link to this comment

One Stop Gardens solar NiCad charger caused LEDs to run for about 22 hours before they quit.

What’s the difference between a NiMH battery charger and a NiCd battery charger.

The biggest differences are in the charge rate (how fast the charger can charge batteries) and the charge control (how the charge determines when to stop the charge). Many of the inexpensive NiMH battery chargers are simply NiCd chargers that have been modified slightly.

Typically a 5 hour NiCd charger has a switch that allows the charge time to be increased from five hours to eight hours. Thus a 5 hour NiCd charger becomes an 8 hour NiMh charger. As we mentioned above, we do not recommend this type of charger design.

While a timer type charger is less expensive to manufacture than a smart charger, it can lead to overcharging and battery damage if batteries are frequently charged before they have been discharged (that is, the batteries are used for a short time and then fully charged again).

NiMH smart chargers have actually been designed to detect when a NiMH battery is fully charged and then shut off or go into a trickle charge mode. Because of the more complex circuitry, this type of charger costs more to make, but should lead to greater battery life.

Some of these chargers only cost slightly more that the “dumb” chargers. We strongly recommend investing in a smart charger for your NiMH or NiCd batteries.

Let’t see how One Stop Gardens solar charger does with NiMH batteries.

Better to light a candle than curse the darkness.

Several people are associated with this proverbial saying, notably John F. Kennedy.

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By entropy2, April 6, 2012 at 5:10 pm Link to this comment

One aspect entirely ignored in this is how publicly funded/maintained highways benefit our factory farm agriculture and big box stores (and, by extension, our “friends” in China). Talk about externalizing costs! Now, personally, I’m not in favor of state subsidies for anyone. BUT, if we’ve got to have them, at least let them favor local communities, producers and consumers.

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By prisnersdilema, April 6, 2012 at 5:08 pm Link to this comment

Uranium mining contributes gargantuan amounts of hydrocarbons to the air, the milling
also requires mega joules of electricity, provided by coal fired plants.  Reactors
themselves, release deadly amounts of radioactive noble gases, and tritium that causes
deadly forms of cancers in those living near reactors, and working in them. Nuclear
power is suicide. However suicide can be profitable to those who are untroubled by the
consequences. Still no method exists to dispose of spent fuel rods, which are usually
stored on site. Hence the problems at Fukashima and the potential world wide lethal
contamination, even more problematic than the billions of tons of radioactive
Waste being dumped into the pacific right now.

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By christian96, April 6, 2012 at 4:28 pm Link to this comment

More roads, more cars, more gasoline, more money for oil companies. Why do most of our problems seem to
gravitate toward oil companies?  We can’t get vechiles
which run on something other than gasoline because
the oil companies use their influence and money to
prevent it. People have forgotten about the long lines
at gasoline stations in the mid-1970’s because there was an OIL CRISIS. Did anyone every explain the so-called oil crusus?  Absolutely not! Because those who
run our lives knew we would forget about it and get all
caught up in other pursuits.  Well, there is one pursuit that I would like to see investigated by someone.  Was there collaboration between OPEC and
gasoline corporations to produce a phoney oil crisis
to create a situation for raising the price of gas?
I believe there was but I can’t prove it.  Is there
anyone out there that can prove it?  Henry Ford and
John Rockefeller couldn’t have envisioned the extant
consequences resulting from their inventions.

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By prosefights, April 6, 2012 at 4:05 pm Link to this comment

REAL problems confront us.

Tuesday April 3, 2012 06:00

The US produces only 7% of the uranium it consumes, Byron King reported.

Written material has the problem that it is written by authors. And they cannot be trusted. Especially MSM. [Who are liberal arts ‘educated’ according to Mark Mathis]


Five new generators are on track for completion this decade, including two reactors approved just a few weeks ago (the first new reactor approvals in the US in over 30 years). Those will add to the 104 reactors that are already in operation around the country and already produce 20% of the nation’s power.
Those reactors will eat up 19,724 tonnes of U3O8 this year, which represents 29% of global uranium demand. If that seems like a large amount, it is! The US produces more nuclear power than any other country on earth, which means it consumes more uranium that any other nation. However, decades of declining domestic production have left the US producing only 4% of the world’s uranium.

With so little homegrown uranium, the United States has to import more than 80% of the uranium it needs to fuel its reactors. Thankfully, for 18 years a deal with Russia has filled that gap. The “Megatons to Megawatts” agreement, whereby Russia downblends highly enriched uranium from nuclear warheads to create reactor fuel, has provided the US with a steady, inexpensive source of uranium since 1993. The problem is that the program is coming to an end next year.

The Upside to a Natural Gas Downturn
Marin Katusa, for The Daily Reckoning
Monday April 2, 2012

Good solar may be helpful?

http://www.prosefights.org/pnmrider/solarlights.htm

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By prisnersdilema, April 6, 2012 at 3:45 pm Link to this comment

If building 4 at Fukishima collapses with 1,535 spent full rods 100 feet above ground it
would also mean that 6,375 fuel rods would also be effected 50 meters away.

The effect would be to release 85 times the amount of Cesium released in Chernobyl.

That would be the end of mankind, all of us. No deals with God, no technological
intervention, it would be on the Beach the whole world.

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By randymoon, April 6, 2012 at 2:59 pm Link to this comment

Your report brings to mind Jane Kay Holtz’ “Asphalt Nation,” an exhaustive 1990s
study and history of the devastation to community and country caused by the
automobile.  Maybe Americans will one day change their attitude.  I apologize if
the book has already been referenced.

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By prosefights, April 6, 2012 at 2:37 pm Link to this comment

Lot’s of problems.

Solar Trust of America, a German company developing one of the world’s largest solar power plants near Blythe, this week filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, raising questions about the future of its solar projects.

We may be using less gas ... and electricity too in the future?  And pay more?

Google ‘Case No. 12-00007-UT’ to see the liberal arts ‘educated’ open mouths approach to raising electric rates to support altenergy.

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By gerard, April 6, 2012 at 1:52 pm Link to this comment

I’m unwilling to write us all off at this point. Not until every suicidal impulse has been thwarted by all possibilities for life have been discovered, tried and failed.  Then .... maybe ...

Why?  Because most of us aren’t really trying. Some of us are too defeated already.  Some of us are afraid to try the best we know. Some of us hate life or are so disppointed in human beings or frightened of “the end of civilization” and such that they would actually like to bring it all to a halt.

We cannot live by faith in human beings alone—but we cannot live without it either.

Why do artists like Mc Carthy write novels like “The Road”?

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By prisnersdilema, April 6, 2012 at 12:45 pm Link to this comment

The road we are on, is the same one travelled by beached Whales, and dolphins, Dodo
birds, extinct Tazmanian marsupials, and people that still live in areas contaminated by
Chernobyl.

Ok so all you good folks in California, that will play blind mans bluff in the fall, after
being spun wildly around the room by Romney’s and Obama’s spin doctors, you will
grope your way to the voting booth, where you will blindly vote, one more time.

Wanna see how much Mr. Barry Sotero cares about you? After Fukishima, sent billions
of radiation particles into the wind, radiating California, and all it’s produce, grass that
cows eat, fish that Sushi eaters love, and children.

Instead of informing people how to protect themselves, how to make their food safer,
and protect themselves and their families, he raised the acceptable radiation limits, and
forbad the EPA, or any of the other dummy protection agencies from monitoring the
fallout. This ensures, that millions of children will die, along with spontaneous abortions
of fetuses.  Have you inhaled a particle of plutonium today? Or has someone you love?

The should make one of his largest donors the nuclear power industry very happy. KA-
CHING, KA-CHING.

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By moonraven, April 6, 2012 at 12:02 pm Link to this comment

The Road is the very same that Cormac McCarthy described.

Only his portrayal was optimistic.

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By gerard, April 6, 2012 at 11:43 am Link to this comment

The “road” we really need to get off of leads into that dark, haunted forest of artificially induced fear, hatred and violence that is being created for us in order enslave us. We need to take command of our lives and step out into the light by working together and taking care of each other, understanding
differences and accepting challenges with a will for
nonviolent resurrection.  Yes, I’ll use that word in honor of an important human metaphor that calls us from the grave of fear and violence and sets us on a 21st Century Road to Emmaus.

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By moonraven, April 6, 2012 at 10:13 am Link to this comment

Where you are going is into the sewers of history.

Aqualungs, anyone?

Thigh-high rubber boots?

I am reminded of that great chase scene in The Third Man, where Orson Welles is chased like a rat through the sewers of Vienna.

They got him, too.

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By jimmmmmy, April 6, 2012 at 9:25 am Link to this comment

Politics make strange bedfellows. comes to mind while reading this post. The 1%ers don’t use roads much anymore they prefer air travel private jets and helicopters, so pulling funding out of hiways is fine with them unless there is taxpayer money to be sucked up building them. In the age of the Security state people are being discouraged from travelling , bad things happen when your stopped by para-militaries on the hiways or the airports Your a bit behind the curve here. There will be no major transit initiatives in the near future [next 10 years]

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By karlInSanDiego, April 6, 2012 at 9:04 am Link to this comment

David, I enjoy your reporting, and while you make a valid point about congestion never receding, I fear your life as a journalist who works away from home often may be clouding your vision of where we’re going.  The car’s not going anywhere.  The biggest American cities have public transportation, but that’s not the lion share of people in the US.  What I see changing is the automakers and OPEC enjoying the final years of their oil bath.  Hybrids and small cars (seen the Scion IQ?) are just a harbinger of the EV revolution that we’re on the cusp of.  And when we’re all in BEVs in traffic, we’ll no longer be pissing away energy, as BEV’s generally stop drawing power when standing still (aside from a radio or climate control).  You will see a short freakout as the power companies try their hand at monopolistic gouging when they realize they’re now profiting from the massive influx in power usage for transportation, but that will lead to even greater energy independence when the democratizing factor of home solar beats out anything the local PowCo wants to sell you.  That’s the future I see.  The last time I traveled in Orange County via bus it took 3 connections and 3.5 hours to get to my destination that a 35 minute car ride handled every day.  Clearly that round trip would make it an impossible commute.  Public transportation works great when people are compressed into a space where walking is an alternative to a bus or train when you miss it or it’s full.  Only dense urban areas allow for that.

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By balkas, April 6, 2012 at 8:28 am Link to this comment

good point about ‘researchers’ from university of toronto. they, too, are
inseparable part of those who so ruthlessly control us.
and they must obey their brethren-in-thought or else!!
and it seems that these ‘researchers’ dwell solely on symptoms and never
on root cause and what that root cause [wish to control people and
render them much dependent] causes.
public transportation, on the other hand, makes people by far more
interdependent; thus less exposed to abuse by invisible faces in high
towers.

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By balkas, April 6, 2012 at 7:57 am Link to this comment

technology, or even science, MUST always be deemed part of reality and knowledge.
alas, everywhere science/technology is not treated/deemed as a part of reality, and thus also not of ALL OF US, OUR
KNOWLEDGE; ie, OUR GREATEST WEALTH.
for some time now, say a century or so, technology, which is an inseparable part of science [also knowledge] and also
the only reality we have, had been controlled by a minority of people.
we have been deprived of THE RIGHT TO KNOW and knowledge by a minority of people: politicians, clergy,
‘scientists’, inventors, columnists, plutocrats, ‘teachers’, or about 1 to 20% of a pop in any country.
but once children in schools were deprived of their greatest heritage, the RIGHT TO KNOW [which only sets you free],
it resulted in the apsolute rule or DIKTATORSHIP of the ONE PERCENT; aka, “democracy”, the best facsist governance
ever invented.
===
what can we do to restore to our children [and many adults, of course] their rightful and most precious inheritance, the
RIGHT TO KNOW, NOT TO BE DECEIVED, NOT TO BE RENDERED SEMANTIC SLAVE, ETC?.
talk and write to people and children as i do now, wld win some of them over, i hope.
sirota cld have done it here on td. so cld scheer, hedges, robinson, boyarsky, nader, moore, et al, but don’t expect they
ever will go to the roots of the fruit tree that gives us the rotten fruits.
they are to busy mending the old pants and nurturing the tree.
jesus did talk about that syndrome, but i do not think he meant with that utterance what WE mean.
suppose he did mean what we mean?
that means that the ALL clerics [islamic, christian, hindi, talmudic, buddhist] rejects his most valuable teachings!!
thanks, bozhidar b.

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By Jim Yell, April 6, 2012 at 7:20 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

The big problem is we have no appetite for making hard decisions. No matter how justified a need is there will be a block of people who not only will oppose, but many who will actually refuse to cooperate. That can be both a good thing and too frequently it can be a bad thing.

If we want a society where everyone has individual access to private transportation than we must have a much smaller population than we do, or destroy the foundations of life. Which is much the pattern we are on now.

If we want a larger population than we now have, which we already have a population too large to continue our current pattern than we must utilize more cooperation, more sharing and more thought about every thing, even the little things.

With a large population, we should have a focus on mass transportation to the exculsion of private transportation, we should have renewable and green energy production. Instead of huge industrial electrical factories we should have households with small wind turbines, photovoltic electric production and backup batteries. Cities should not burn lights 24/7, back to buildings built to use natural sunlight for enterior lighting.

We have to turn away from childish wishful thinking and make real adult decisions, which fairly rules out the current political and government culture.

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By BrilliantBill, April 6, 2012 at 7:17 am Link to this comment

Mr. Sirota asks, “But what happens when America suddenly tones down its love affair with the automobile?” Not much is my answer.

This is the year I abandoned car ownership. I decided the overall costs aren’t worth it. There are few places I need to go that I can’t get to on public transportation. In the rare instance I might really need a car, I can borrow or rent one for a day or two. While this reasoning has proved flawless it has produced psychological horror in friends and family.

“I’m not sure I can think of anything more gruesome,” said one friend of the thought of riding a transit bus. I haven’t bothered to ask when was the last time he was on a bus, probably many, many years ago.

The family speaks in hushed tones, as if I’ve been diagnosed with a terminal disease. “How will you live?” one asked me? They cannot imagine life without a car. Even people who lose homes can retreat, if only for a time, to their cars. I frankly see such dependence as crippling.

I see it in the faces and eyes of car drivers as I stand at a bus stop. “Thank God that’s not me,” they are clearly thinking. Surely having to wait for a bus is even more unthinkable than waiting in traffic jams each day! And to share your space with other people, ones you don’t even know while going about your business? Oh, the horror. A fate reserved for only the poor.

I would suggest the University of Toronto “researchers” have actually reconfirmed what we have known for many years. I’m sure if you read their report they will end with the classic “need for further research” conclusion. Like a car that won’t go without gasoline, such academics require constant research funding to continue affirming what we know. As a transportation lobbyist over 20 years ago, I knew well the documented reality of more roads equals more cars.

The personal car has evolved to be an ingrained characteristic of the American psyche. To challenge that is virtually impossible without suggesting (perhaps courting?) catastrophe. So, if a few young people in urban environments don’t have enough money for both cars AND iPads, iPhones, etc., what will it matter? More money, I guess, for Apple shareholders.

Meanwhile, I’ll sit back, relax and let someone else do the driving.

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By Richard, April 6, 2012 at 5:13 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

I’m a young person who didn’t get a licence until a
few months ago at the age of 27 and then only out of
necessity. If the I-70 is full then it makes sense to
increase capacity. However, I look forward to a
future when cars drive themselves and we don’t own
them but instead fewer cars are active more of the
time transporting us to where ever we want to go. In
this future we should also be able to dismantle
motorways and reclaim the countryside as the
automated cars will be able to drive faster and
closer together, negotiate junctions at full speed
and run on solar generated electricity. I think the
inclusion of high technology into every day life is
what young people want and will help create for our
future.

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