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Remembering the Real Deal

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Posted on Aug 25, 2009
Kennedy
AP / Charles Dharapak

By Robert Scheer

The light has gone out, and with it that infectious warm laugh and intensely progressive commitment of the best of the Kennedys. Not, at this point, to take anything away from the memory of his siblings—Bobby, whom I also got to know, was pretty terrific in his last years—but Sen. Ted Kennedy was the real deal.

Unable to move with his brothers’ intellectual alacrity, sometimes plodding in impromptu expression but smooth and skillful while reading from a script, the youngest Kennedy made up for his shortcomings early in his Senate career by resolutely working the substance of issues. His principled determination, plus his capacity to truly care about the real-world outcomes of legislation for ordinary people rather than its impact on his or anyone else’s election, became his signature qualities as a lawmaker. But for those same reasons, he also wanted legislation passed, and his ability to work with the opposition, as he did three years ago with John McCain on immigration reform, now grants him a legacy as one of the nation’s great senators.

Oddly enough, for one born into such immense familial expectations, he was a surprisingly accessible and down-to-earth politician in the eyes of most journalists who covered him. I think of him as always authentic and never oily. As opposed to most politicians, the offstage Ted Kennedy was the more appealing one.

Although he excelled as an orator, never more so than delivering the speech that Bob Shrum crafted for him at the 1980 Democratic convention but which was informed by Kennedy’s own deeply felt passion, it was in his less choreographed moments that he was at his best. I spent quite a few hours over the years interviewing him on subjects ranging from health care to nuclear arms control, mostly as a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, and while his grammar could be troubling, his sentiments never were.

Not once in those interviews did I find Kennedy to equivocate or slide into the amoral triangulation that defines almost all successful politicians. They position themselves, but he took positions, and, as in the case of health care reform, he would end his life fighting for those causes with his last breath.

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I would put Kennedy alongside my other hero, George McGovern, as the most trusted standard-bearer of the Democratic Party’s too-often-sabotaged liberalism. I just could never imagine either of them ever selling us out. Indeed, I haven’t felt quite so sad about the passing of a political leader since the day when people started bawling all over the Bronx with the news that FDR had died. In a political world dominated by bipartisan cynicism, there are few touchstones of integrity for the common folk, and Kennedy was one of them.

Lest I be accused of surrendering to the emotions of the moment, let me quote from a column I wrote in January of 2008 when the Democratic presidential primary battle hung in the balance:

“It should mean a great deal to progressives that in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination Sen. Ted Kennedy favors Sen. Barack Obama over two other colleagues he has worked with in the Senate. No one in the history of that institution has been a more consistent and effective fighter than Kennedy for an enlightened agenda, be it civil rights and liberty, gender equality, labor and immigrant justice, environmental protection, educational opportunity or opposing military adventures.

“Kennedy was a rare sane voice among the Democrats in strongly opposing the Iraq war, and it is no small tribute when he states: `We know the record of Barack Obama. There is the courage he showed when so many others were silent or simply went along. From the beginning, he opposed the war in Iraq. And let no one deny that truth.’ ”

Hopefully, it will be added to Ted Kennedy’s legacy that he was right about Obama, just as he was consistently right on every major issue that he dealt with as a senator. Kennedy’s endorsement of Obama was critical to our current president’s historic nomination and election, and it is therefore fitting that the favor of that all-important endorsement be returned with a significant reform of the ailing U.S. health care system.

In the first year of the George W. Bush presidency, I wrote a column for the Los Angeles Times entitled “Bush Could Really Use a Fireside Chat With FDR,” stating: “This is a president who never learned that it is possible to be a leader born of privilege and yet be absorbed with the fate of those in need. … Not so Roosevelt, a true aristocrat whose genuine love of the common man united this country to save it during its most severe time of economic turmoil and devastating war.” Kennedy wrote a note thanking me for the column, adding, “I can think of at least fifty on the Senate side of Capitol Hill that could benefit from a good fireside chat as well.” 

That’s also a worthy epitaph for Ted Kennedy: Born of privilege, and yet absorbed with the fate of those in need.

     

Click here to check out Robert Scheer’s book,
“The Great American Stickup: How Reagan Republicans and Clinton Democrats Enriched Wall Street While Mugging Main Street.”


Keep up with Robert Scheer’s latest columns, interviews, tour dates and more at www.truthdig.com/robert_scheer.



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By StuartH, August 30, 2009 at 10:57 am Link to this comment

Johannes:

I appreciate your contribution to the discussion, but you insist on being
negative and so I must register a protest.  American life is tremendously
complicated and most people here disagree about how to view it.  We are like a
large and noisy family who probably confuse the heck out of the neighbors. 

I suggest that your attempts at analyzing what you see might be better served
by more reading and contemplation and less negativity. 

To me, Ted Kennedy and his brothers John and Bobby and many of his other
family members are quintessentially American.  Lots of trouble and tragedy,
very complicated, drew a whole lot of criticism and controversy, but in the end,
are like the rest of us.  Flawed and very human people who try.  Sometimes we
succeed and sometimes we fail.  But we try. And, despire our tendencies to
become embittered or depressed, we persist and we attempt to help others as
we can along the way. 

What I call tough optimism means that you find a way to look forward and a
reason to keep trying, even though you know full well what the worst in human
nature and the world is. 

To not be able to see beyond the muck on the bottom is no way to advance
upward.  You have to be able to at least believe that there is light somewhere and begin to move towards it.  If that weren’t dynamic in human nature, we would still be hitting each other over the head with clubs and fighting over scraps of carrion.

Report this

By johannes, August 30, 2009 at 2:06 am Link to this comment

Dear Sir Stuarth,

The funny thing about the new age in the state is this, all the white people where slave traders, all the Indians are left overs from the butchering, well they like to speek about a melting pot, but for the outsiders its more a pot full of something els.

As if how you write about young people, how is it possebel that you have all this prissons so full, all this miserable young drug adicts.

Look to your universeties, the procentage of white young Americans is every year smaller, rich emigrants are taking their place.

The American soldiers are fithing not for their country and culturel heritage, they are fithing for the rich kapitalist, so they can make more money.

In 1956 I made a tour through the U.S.A.afther I finist high school, I visited all our famelie, well it is still an very fine nostalgic souvenir, but I understand also that I bether can live with this souvenir than to take a new look, yes let we say its the teidgeist, as Kurt Vonnegut wrote.

Salutation

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By christian96, August 29, 2009 at 11:30 pm Link to this comment

Ardee and Ouroborus——Thanks for the support of my
comments of a great leader who the common people
will miss greatly in the senate.  One of his stature
comes along sadly very infrequently.  As for our
disagreements, we all are brothers and sisters who
happen to be sharing this planet at the same time.
Constructive disagreement is reflective of a step
towards growth in our democracy.  The disagreements
become distructive when we attempt to attack the
person rather than the issues.  We must serve together to seek to make our nation productive for
all rather than a “so called” elite few.  Then we
will win the respect of peoples around the world.

Report this
OzarkMichael's avatar

By OzarkMichael, August 29, 2009 at 6:11 pm Link to this comment

Soneone said: Until bush and all his cabal are brought to justice and executed for their unspeakable war-crimes we will never be a society that stands for social justice, which is what this great man fought for his entire live.

Calling for Bush’s death in homage to Kennedy?  How stupid. How barbaric. How cheap.

Report this

By freedom loving american, August 29, 2009 at 5:36 pm Link to this comment

It is so sad to see this great proud American pass on, on so many levels. He was great humanitarian, a great voice for those with none, and a great politician that was able to make a difference. I know the idiotic rightwing hatenuts that are hell-bent on destroying this great country and everything it stands for have for the last 40+ years ranted endlessly about one night in this great mans live, which says more about them than he. 

What caught my eye was the most horrific war criminal in American history was seated in a place of honor at this great mans funeral.  Bush sitting there a free man smirking knowing he got away with murdering millions of innocents and destroying tens of millions of lives so his rich family and rich friends could get richer. Until bush and all his cabal are brought to justice and executed for their unspeakable war-crimes we will never be a society that stands for social justice, which is what this great man fought for his entire live.

May God bless you and may I thank you; Senator Kennedy.

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By ardee, August 29, 2009 at 5:00 pm Link to this comment

StuartH, August 29 at 6:12 pm #

Thank you for that neat tale. My interest in the subject stems from my second eldest grandson, Franklin Richard, a proud member of the Red Lakes Band Chippewa ( Ojibwe).

Report this

By truedigger3, August 29, 2009 at 3:35 pm Link to this comment

Re: mike112769, August 29 at 5:13 pm #

mike112769,

You made a very good point about the two tier justice.

Report this

By StuartH, August 29, 2009 at 3:12 pm Link to this comment

Ardee:

There is a place at the head of Canyon de Chelly, up on the flanks of the
Chuska and Lukachukai mountain chains where the Navajo Nation placed the
main campus of its multicampus tribal college.

DIne’ College was founded in the early 1970s to create a social, spiritual and
educational support for the bright kids growing up on the reservation.  They
come into a community of people dedicated to advocating traditional values
under the rubric “Sa’a N’yeaa Bikeh Hozhon” an ancient sacred wisdom
tradition.  This is matched with the national accreditation board requirements
for higher education and has been pretty successful on the whole.

At graduation, in early June, you see ancient elders wearing their best velveteen
blouses and shirts with all the turquoise jewelry they have, having traveled for
miles.  Many generations are present.  Most of the men are in newly bought
jeans and western shirts.

The president recounts a story from the founding of the college.  A group of
the men who were planning the college met in a small community school in a
very remote place (which by he way Ted Kennedy once visited) and they invited
the head of the regional Bureau of Indian Affairs.  At some point, he felt called
on to speak and interrupt.  He told them that they didn’t know how complicated
what they were contemplating was or what it would take.  It was impossible
and the BIA would never support this. 

They all calmly looked at him and the future president of the college spoke to
him and said, “We invited you here out of courtesy to let you know what we are
going to do.  Your permission is not needed or wanted.”

The crowd gets a kick out of this.  They stand straighter and look prouder. 

There are by now kids that have gone on to graduate from Harvard Law School
and from various medical schools and graduate schools. 

The neighborhood is fiercely proud of its family roots and traditional lifeways. 
There were a number of prominent medicine men living around there.  When
you meet people who are educated in both their own traditional ways and in
terms of modern education, you meet some impressive - and well adjusted
people.  The future looks bright, from this vantage point.  Of course there are
the problems and they are all around and obvious.  But what gives people the
strength to move forward anyway and to build a future, is a sense of endurance
that comes from being in a land with ancestral roots going back well before
Europeans began arriving with the attitude that they ought to tell these people
how to live.

Report this

By truedigger3, August 29, 2009 at 3:03 pm Link to this comment

StuartH wrote:
“seeing Barack and Michelle Obama sitting next to Bill and Hillary Clinton, next to George and Laura Bush, with Nancy Reagan behind, and leading Republican Senators, I wondered at the contrast, the lack of elegance, the crassness of spirit, the un-generousness and crumminess that seems to have infected the spirit of our times, as I look at many of the posts on Truthdig.”
___________________________________________________

StuartH,

And your point is..??!!! Many of the characters you listed above are flawed and did or contributed to considerable damgage here and abroad.
Are you trying to tell us,“the unwashed uncouth plebians”, that we are having a new Royality that is ruling by divine will and we shoud bow in owe and submission??
Of course you can find wisdom, grace and good will in a Navajo Reservation and also in many other places, but again, what is it that you trying to say?? That we should accept whatever is dished at us with happiness and acceptance because all our problems are stemming from our un-generous crumminess.
You gave us some meaningless ramblings. I wonder what is the reason??

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By ardee, August 29, 2009 at 2:55 pm Link to this comment

StuartH, August 29 at 1:05 pm

Indian reservations are among the highest known sources for unemployment and incidents of alcoholism, drug addiction and suicide. You must have lived in a unique place indeed.

Report this

By StuartH, August 29, 2009 at 2:27 pm Link to this comment

Johannes:

I saw a presentation last night for an audience with probably about 1,000 local
teachers which featured a group of about 7 or 8 kids in about the 4th through
the 6th grades.  Very young.  They went through a very challenging routine
which included various sections from Shakespeare and some rock songs that
happened to fit. 

Afterwards we met them.  Amazingly poised.  Very courteous, humble and
keenly intelligent.  They were really cute signing autographs. 

I think it is a mistake to broad brush “the youth” as not having the same
potential as our elders.  I certainly remember a lot of “kids these days”
disparagements back in the ‘50s and ‘60s.  I bet people were saying that about
the younger generation thousands of generations ago. 

There is always something to find fault with and to poor mouth if you want to
make a case for being negative.  It is a choice.

Report this

By mike112769, August 29, 2009 at 2:13 pm Link to this comment

ARDEE: Belittle him? I don’t care enough about him to denigrate him in any way. My point was this: There are 2 laws in America, the Rich Man’a Law and The Public’s Law. Rare indeed is the man who does no good at all during the course of his life. As far as I’m concerned, his moral authority died when he left that woman to slowly drown. He never did pay for that. Leaving the scene my ass. That was AT BEST vehicular homicide caused by drunk driving. By the way, if that had been me or thee that did that, we would’ve went to prison. You know it’s true. Yes, I know that rich families help each other out. Tell me, just because all of them are doing it, does it make it right? Should we let criminals go with a lesser charge if they promise to help the community? Should we just make the separate laws official, one for the rich and one for the rest? At what point do we draw the line? I find it fascinating to watch people in politics speak about ideals, and then promptly trash them at the first chance. Kennedy (any of them) was very good at that. As far as defending the right wing? Please. Those people are just as guilty as the rest of us are for this whole damn mess. I don’t care about someone’s beliefs as long as they do what’s right for the people and civilization in general. That’s damn rare on either side. Have a nice day.

Johannes: You are apparently a man who listens to history. Rather novel in this day and age. Too bad more people don’t do the same.

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By johannes, August 29, 2009 at 12:51 pm Link to this comment

Dear Sir Stuarth,

Nicely spoken, but what to do with all the weaklings, or stupid people, for your kind of thinking you need people with an education a special way of thinking and a fighting spirit.


Its the older generation you are speeking about, the young one’s are looking for the easy ways.


Salutations

Report this

By StuartH, August 29, 2009 at 10:05 am Link to this comment

Listening to a soaring Ave Maria and seeing Barack and Michelle Obama sitting
next to Bill and Hillary Clinton, next to George and Laura Bush, with Nancy
Reagan behind, and leading Republican Senators, I wondered at the contrast,
the lack of elegance, the crassness of spirit, the un-generousness and
crumminess that seems to have infected the spirit of our times, as I look at many
of the posts on Truthdig. 

I have been tempted by depression and immobilizing anxiety or fear and have
searched very deeply about the causes of this.  Why be dispirited?

For several years I lived on the Navajo Nation and met a lot of people who had
lots of reasons for dispiritedness, cynicism and even deep seated self-loathing
and hatred towards others just on sight.  That I found good humor,
generousness, courtesy and unfailing faith in the family, in community and the
great legacies of the past was inspiring and I found this healing for me, an
outsider to this. 

The greatest wisdom that elders can teach us, no matter what their origin, is that the world is, as it is.  There are terrifying threats if you really understand what is
real, and perilous risks and dangers.  Really, there are no guarantees and
security is at best, temporary.  People who try to deal with the problems and
issues of our time, knowing that no good deed goes unpunished, and knowing
the murderous nature of the powers that be, will most often fail due to human
vulnerability and will disappoint those who hope for some transcendance. 
Sometimes people achieve a better batting average in this attempt than most.

When this happens, we should celebrate.  For every person that manages to
accomplish something there are millions who won’t try, don’t get the
opportunity, or fail when they do.  The number of casualties in the effort to
improve conditions is staggering.  But that is the way the world has always
been.  What we still hope for is a better future and for people to keep trying,
despite the odds.  “It doesn’t matter how strong the forces are against us as
long as we don’t quit trying.”  Ted Kennedy said that.  It is as good an
observation as anyone might ever make.  The ability to see clearly the fearful
nature of what challenges must be faced, and yet, to meet them with a grin, a
gleam in the eye and zest for the fight is courageous.  We all could use more of
that.

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By johannes, August 29, 2009 at 9:57 am Link to this comment

Dear sir Ouroborus,


Between making money and crasping money is a very differnd way of thinking an doing.

Lots of people from Europe went to the States, and wend up working in the mines from the Gugenheim famelie, who where more or less in the white slave trade.

Yoy never will be rich with normal working, their allways something say half criminal on the site, famelies with lots of wealth, will legalize this wealth by starting to go in politics and do some philantropic gestures.

And I know it I a have lots of rich famelie relations, and most of them are real stinkers, they have never enough, and they give nothing for people who die from hunger and sickness.


In the land of the free their are to much people without any money, and others have much to much, if you not going to change that, their will be a lot of problems and killings.


salutation

Report this

By ardee, August 29, 2009 at 9:43 am Link to this comment

Truedigger3, August 29 at 11:45 am #

In a career spanning 47 years one might find a bit , here and there, to criticize. Yet the list of his accomplishments, posted already several times, is long and illustrious.

Report this

By StuartH, August 29, 2009 at 8:50 am Link to this comment

Johannes:

The Kennedy’s didn’t start out rich.  They came to America as desperate as any
who had some reason for escaping the various tragedies of the old country. 
They were aggressive and very smart.  The great American wisdom is that
bettering one’s condition doesn’t have to depend on the position one was born
into, but the zest for excellence.  You can see this in more recent immigrant
families.  People grab the main chance with everything they have and succeed.

This is the best that America can bring out in people.  Knowing that there are
craven fools in powerful places and that the ambition to succeed can be met
with murderous opposition requires real courage.  But cowardice doesn’t create
progress.  It is only half intelligent to see the dangers.  The other half comes
from striking out towards solutions.

That is the condition of the world.  Many of us succumb to cynicism or
depression over this and are rendered impotent by fear.  To see our brothers
literally killed over this, would profoundly affect any of us. 

For someone to rise to the challenge by being articulate, graceful, hardworking,
to have intellectual integrity, to meet hatreds with smiles and kindness, to
never stop trying to overcome one’s own darker human failings, to never stop
fighting for good causes even if they are hopeless, this is always miraculous.

We should always stop and consider this sort of thing when it becomes
available to us, and renew our own commitment to being human in the best
sense we can imagine.  To take this seriously is no sort of clowning.

Report this

By truedigger3, August 29, 2009 at 8:45 am Link to this comment

With all that hoopla and fanfare about the late Ted Kennedy and about him being a defender of the common people, true and undoctored history tells a different story.
During the Carter presidency, Kennedy championed and was instrumental in deregualting truking and the airlines which was a powerful blow against their labor unions that decimated their membership and their bargaining power.
His legal advisor at that time was Stephen Bryer who sits in US supreme court right now and who is staunch defender of corporations.
During the Clinton presidency he championed deregulating telecommunications with the same harmful results for their workers and their union.
He championed “free trade” and helped Clinton in pushing NAFTA and WTO down our throats although Clinton during the election campaign was against it.
NAFTA and WTO accelerated the offshoring of millions of good paying jobs and replacing them with WALMART and MCDONALD jobs. The prosperous working/middle class is erroding rapidly as a result of that.
Ted Kennedy opposed a very good health care reform bill that was introduce by Nixon that almost offered universal coverage. Kennedy didn’t want Nixon to have such an achievement. Kennedy was hoping for the presidency one day and wanted that achievement for himself??!!
Yes, Ted Kennedy championed raising the minimum wage, but this is, in my humble opinion, is the least he should do to alleviate some of the damage to the working people he conributed to.
I got many of the points in this post from http://www.counterpunch.org in an article by Alexander Cockbourn dated 8/28/2009

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By johannes, August 29, 2009 at 8:00 am Link to this comment

Dear sir Stuarth,

That they could freely move around every where, had to do with their wealth and education.

Their will allways be an resentment against rich people, as you know with hard working you geth never rich.

We have the feeling in Europe that the people who murdered the Kennedy’s, are now reign over the U.S., and command and controle all the weapen industries, and that how you geth all your wars.

In Europe no this could not happen but we have some great clowns from our selfs.


salutation

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Ouroborus's avatar

By Ouroborus, August 29, 2009 at 7:48 am Link to this comment

johannes, August 29 at 9:54 am #

Dear Mr. Johannes,

The U.S. government did “catch” the killers of the
Kennedy brothers. Robert’s killer for sure, but some
doubt remains regarding Jack’s killer, Lee Harvey
Oswald. We are, sadly, not a united republic. And,
the white tras as you say, will not stand up because,
I’m ashamed to say, they are afraid. We are now, a
nation of cowards, so, do not look to us for answers
because we do not have any. I fear greatly for my
country’s people; they have nothing left to lose as
everything is gone and I don’t understand why they
don’t fight. Thank you and I hope you understand my
comments. Peace to you.

Report this

By StuartH, August 29, 2009 at 7:24 am Link to this comment

Johannes:

Ted Kennedy did, in a way, go after “the killers of his brothers,” if you take it
broadly instead of narrowly.

I remember being a kid in Texas when Kennedy was elected.  A lot of people
hated the Kennedys with a deep and visceral, instinctive hatred and this is what
created the atmosphere that made murder possible. 

This visceral hatred can’t be explained in rational terms, but in deeply Freudian
or Jungian terms.  Politics isn’t always about the things we can name as issues,
but also about deepset desires we can’t put into words.

There are deepset animosities floating around in the American psyche, some
borrowed from European history.  For instance, a lot of people used to express
a general hatred of Irish ethnicity.  Others hated the face that the Kennedys
were one of America’s richest families, just because they were rich.  That they
were so frankly aggressive about achieving excellence in a culture full of TV
watching wallowers in consumerist indulgence, caused resentment.  That they
saw a world freely, without restraint and could move in any circles also caused
resentment.  One can go on.  Lots of resentments.  In a way, they stood for
what America needed to overcome in its smallness and prejudices in order to
evolve towards its best potential. 

The miracle is that Ted Kennedy didn’t withdraw from the hot limelight and the
intensification that it produced, the environment in the public space that killed
his brothers.  Instead, he sought to deal with that which he must have feared,
including his own failings. 

That he worked so hard at it, that he became a champion for many causes that
no doubt caused him to be seen in the tradition of Roosevelt, “a traitor to his
class” was an improbably destiny, an accident of unlikely circumstances and a
rare overcoming of what ordinarily might be expected.  That makes it a really
American story, one that probably couldn’t have happened in Europe.

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By johannes, August 29, 2009 at 6:54 am Link to this comment

Dear Sir Ouroborus.

If you have the power as they say he had, why wash he not going afther the killers of his brothers.

Futher the United States is an united republic, how it comes their are so much rich and wealthy famelies, who behave as noble famelies from the middle ages, I think the so called white tras has to stand up, and demand their rights.

salutations

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Ouroborus's avatar

By Ouroborus, August 29, 2009 at 5:55 am Link to this comment

ardee, August 29 at 7:56 am #

Yup, got to agree with you about #96. He spoke well.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

johannes, August 29 at 7:06 am #

Nice comment to hippy4ever; but I don’t quite
understand these comments:

“When I wash a big and rich men and they started to
kill my famelie of, I should go afther them with all
my big rich fors.”

“How is it that some famelies still call them selfs
Iries Americans, for what reason, to keep them voting
for them.”

Can you clarify them? I can see you’re not a native
English speaker (no problem) but I’d like to
understand the thing you say.  Thanks.

Report this

By ardee, August 29, 2009 at 4:56 am Link to this comment

christian96, August 29 at 1:32 am

I seldom agree with your positions but in this post I think you are eloquent and absolutely on the mark.

It is impossible for some folks, especially in our extremely polarizing political climate, to say anything nice about anyone of the other side.

Report this

By johannes, August 29, 2009 at 4:06 am Link to this comment

Big rich men rule the USA, the small men die for them.

The big rich men live as prnces, in their big estates.

When I wash a big and rich men and they started to kill my famelie of, I should go afther them with all my big rich fors.

How is it that some famelies still call them selfs Iries Americans, for what reason, to keep them voting for them.

Just some thoughts.

Hippie4ever keep it up men, some people can’t be nice, just forget them, some words from an other hippie.

salutation.

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By christian96, August 28, 2009 at 10:32 pm Link to this comment

I’ve read comments about Sen. Kennedy and am really
puzzled to try to understand why some people instead
of praising his positive achievements choose to
concentrate on the few times he stumbled in his
walk on earth.  Maybe these people are living a
miserable life and project their misery through
being critical of others.  I am pleased to read
Robert Scheer’s positive comments about Senator
Kennedy.  God knows the grief he suffered in his
life.  Grief can make us bitter or better.  Thank
God, it made Sen. Kennedy better.

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By ardee, August 28, 2009 at 12:47 pm Link to this comment

mike112769, August 28 at 10:11 am #


Ardee: Convicted? I think not. So, if you (try)to do good in public office, you’re entitled to a murder or two each year? What he did was homicide. Anyone else would have done prison time. His family’s influence saved his ass

Convicted yes, but not of accidental homicide, which might very well have been the charge you or I faced in similar circumstance. He was charged with and convicted of leaving the scene of an accident in fact.

So, that a rich and powerful family sees one of its number escape such a thing is rare to you? So rare in fact that it brings forth such bile against an entire family? Are you simply spouting right wing propaganda or will you concur that wealthy republicans are just as often likely to escape due process?

Regardless of that which you spew the legacy of Edward Kennedy will live long after your silly critiques are forgotten. Today, the news reported that several members of the Kennedy family took the time to walk among the thousands of folks who waited patiently for five hours and more in order to pay their respects to Edward. These Kennedy’s, including the widow, took time from their grief to thank the multitudes for their support…A damn nice touch in fact, far nicer than your own attemtps to diminish and belittle.

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By truedigger3, August 28, 2009 at 11:19 am Link to this comment

Re:hippie4ever, August 28 at 1:12 pm #


Can you pin point where someone, in this thread, attacked you personally before you announced your intention to leave truthdig because in your opinion, “the posters are hysterical and rude”.
I attacked you AFTER you wrote that uncalled for, and may I say, rude statement.

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By hippie4ever, August 28, 2009 at 10:12 am Link to this comment

“Yes, there are other sites, but, don’t allow yourself
to be bullied off of here by some blowhard/s. As Amon
Drool so aptly notes, this is a public forum, not a
private playpen.”—Ourobus

__________________________________________________

Thanks for your support but it really isn’t about that: there will always be trolls
and sociopaths so whatever rubbish truedigger3 hurls, hoping something will
stick, doesn’t concern me.

I liked Truthdig for the civility among educated posters and this has all but
disappeared. I find many overly-long posts to be pedantic, shrill and
doctrinaire. I don’t need this and while I am no coward, I know how to choose
my fights. This site isn’t worth my time anymore, truth be dug.

So I’ve decided to relocate hippie4ever at HuffPo where there will still be
conflict and nastiness, but on a larger, less personal scale. And I’ll have a
greater readership as well—it’s a win-win for me.

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By StuartH, August 28, 2009 at 7:36 am Link to this comment

“Many times Sen. Kennedy fought and did not have the public backing which he should have had, and which was also The People’s wishes.  He fought ANYWAY…... but too many times in vain.

If Sen. Kennedy would’ve had the VOICES of The People demanding they be heard, so much more would… and could, he have accomplished.”

Outraged, you hit the nail on the head there. Part of the most primitive brain is fear based thinking, that part which responds most to negativity. 

Media has come into human experience so recently we are vulnerable to being influenced by demonization and unfairness simply because it works. 

So the progress someone may attempt to achieve very often gets drowned out in a chorus of negativity and by the crabs-in-the-bucket syndrome.

A bunch of crabs in a bucket will react to one crab almost climbing out by pulling it back. For some reason that is deeply embedded in primitive animal nature from over a billion years ago. 

Given that, it is even more amazing to review what Ted Kennedy was able to accomplish. This is the reason that thousands and thousands of people lined the streets as his hearse rode through and why more people are waiting in long lines to pay respects. 

A great man is someone who managed, despite the negativity and the entropy that is normal in life, to surpass expectations and accomplish something.  That he worked very hard and co-sponsored some 2500 bills with over 400 Senate colleagues over a 50 year period is truly a positive thing and a remarkable achievement on an historic scale.  It will be a great example for students of history as long as there is a United States. 

All the negativity that has been in the atmosphere around the Kennedy’s since they emerged on the scene in the 1950s will always be there as well, as a reminder of what is normal in human nature to be overcome whenever something positive and progressive is contemplated. It isn’t for nothing that the term political courage was coined.

Probably a good thing to do at this time would be to contemplate anew, JFK’s college thesis turned into the book “Profiles in Courage.” Being a citizen isn’t the same as being a consumer and looking to civic life in terms of its entertainment value.

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By mike112769, August 28, 2009 at 7:11 am Link to this comment

Ardee: Convicted? I think not. So, if you (try)to do good in public office, you’re entitled to a murder or two each year? What he did was homicide. Anyone else would have done prison time. His family’s influence saved his ass. The Kennedys have been pushed on us as American aristocracy since “Camelot.” That clan is the closest thing we have to feudal power being passed from generation to generation. The best Kennedy founded the Special Olympics. The rest were just politicians.

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By truedigger3, August 28, 2009 at 6:14 am Link to this comment

Re:jmr, August 27 at 11:17 am

jmr,

We expressed our opinion about a public historical figure.
You could have rebutted our opinion without calling names and hurling obscenities at everyone which has shown nothing but how mean spiritted and empty you are.  Do you get my point, you piece of shit mixed with garbage.??!!

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By ardee, August 28, 2009 at 3:28 am Link to this comment

mike112769, August 27 at 10:26 pm #

I can’t get past Chappaquiddick. Letting her die like that while covering his own ass…....
.........................

Try harder….tried, convicted, in the past, sad and over.

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Outraged's avatar

By Outraged, August 27, 2009 at 11:36 pm Link to this comment

Re: Jim Mamer

Your comment:  “I find it fascinating that there are so many negative comments made by those who appear both petty and bitter, and who, I’ll bet, have not given to this country a modicum of what Ted Kennedy did on a weekly basis.”

Thank you Jim Mamer.  I repost this portion of an earlier comment of mine:

“The People love the Kennedys, regardless the tabloids.  This, it seems….. is more indicative of The People’s sentiment than not.  Love is not fickle.  Love is a concept which doesn’t understand strength, it knows no bounds and it has no favorites.  It is love, it exists outside of platitudinal parameters.  It would be an impossiblity to “interrupt” The People’s love for the Kennedys.  It can’t be done, and the folly is realized in the ignorance of those who’ve tried.”

I’d like to add that, there is a reason The People love the Kennedys.  They know that the Kennedys care.  They know this…. and this, has made all the difference.  As often as the American Public is depicted as completely ignorant…. I question, why then do they love the Kennedys so much?  I say there’s a reason.  I say there’s a very good reason.

Additionally, I see this same feeling regarding Pres. Obama, to me that says something.  The American People have never DEMANDED perfection, what they want is integrity in government.  Sen. Kennedy had this faith in then candidate B. Obama, I think that says something too.

Many times Sen. Kennedy fought and did not have the public backing which he should have had, and which was also The People’s wishes.  He fought ANYWAY…... but too many times in vain.

If Sen. Kennedy would’ve had the VOICES of The People demanding they be heard, so much more would… and could, he have accomplished.  But that was then, and this is now.

I thank all the Kennedys…. and I’d be remiss to not acknowledge my apologies to all of them….. for not being that NEEDED voice when they stood without mine and ours…... for all of us.

But even in this, Sen. Kennedy and Pres. Obama are not the only ones who NEED the voice of The People to be heard….. there are others, and they care.  Take care to ascertain the validity of what you read and hear, hold fast to what is fine.

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By Potent_Placebo, August 27, 2009 at 8:10 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

The biggest flaw in Sheer’s article was Palin’s face in
the ad right in the middle of it…. at least when I
read it!

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By Jim Mamer, August 27, 2009 at 7:52 pm Link to this comment

Thank you, Bob Scheer, for a beautiful column.

Speaking as someone who can also be “plodding in impromptu expression,” I loved Ted Kennedy for what he did for all of us, for being the humane being that he was, and I remain jealous of those who got to know him. His ability to overcome loss, to overcome disappointment, even to screw up and admit it, continues to be an inspiration to me. His death, while not unexpected, was devastating to me and I fear devastating to this country.

I find it fascinating that there are so many negative comments made by those who appear both petty and bitter, and who, I’ll bet, have not given to this country a modicum of what Ted Kennedy did on a weekly basis. Why is it that the identities of these angry and mean people seem so often to be hidden behind pseudonyms?

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By mike112769, August 27, 2009 at 7:26 pm Link to this comment

I can’t get past Chappaquiddick. Letting her die like that while covering his own ass…....

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Ouroborus's avatar

By Ouroborus, August 27, 2009 at 7:20 pm Link to this comment

Sorry, make that; Robert Scheer’s “site”.

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By Ouroborus, August 27, 2009 at 7:15 pm Link to this comment

By hippie4ever, August 27 at 11:11 am #

Yes, there are other sites, but, don’t allow yourself
to be bullied off of here by some blowhard/s. As Amon
Drool so aptly notes, this is a public forum, not a
private playpen.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~

By jmr, August 27 at 11:57 am #

Sorry, but my lips are sealed; I would be divulging a
very valued site that has civilized, intelligent, and
informed comments and opinions expressed by obviously
thoughtful people.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There is a stark difference in civility when people
comment from behind aliases as opposed to a face to
face conversation. It’s rather cowardly to say things anonymously that one would never say to ones face. I
am not so naive as to expect things to be different;
but this isn’t Rushes’ or Glenn’s sight but Robert
Scheers. I have never learned or been inclined to
lower my expectations of human behaviour; on the other hand nothing surprises me either.

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By voice of truth, August 27, 2009 at 7:07 pm Link to this comment

I’m no lover of Ted Kennedy or his policies, and I can forgive someone for being less than perfect and having flaws.  What I can not forgive or condone, however, is the basic hypocrisy with which he lived his life.  To whit:

His actions at Chappadquidick followed a few short years later with his lamentations about different levels of justice when Ford pardoned Nixon.

His saluted as for a protector of women’s rights, when he was one of the worst womanizers around (there is no womanizer like a powerful, rich man), followed by his leading the charge against Bob Packwood (Teddy and Chris Dodd and their “waitress sandwich”)

His attacks against Clarence Thomas, when he himself had been guilty of far worse.  I always said that my 2nd favorite Saturday Night Live skit had Kevin Nealon as Teddy, questioning Clarence Thomas.  “Is it true justice Thomas that you walked into the ladies room with your pants around your ankles and pretended it was the men’s room?”  “No Senator”, and Teddy’s reply, “Oh, cause that works too.”

His pro-choice record after being devoutly pro-life.

The ridiculousness of asking the Massachussetts legislature to reverse the law of succession for senator after he himself had asked them to make the initial change only 5 years ago.

Being all for “green” energy, yet, singlehandedly blocking a huge wind turbine project that would affect the view from his estate.

His utterly indefensible, very personal attack on Robert Bork just hours after his nomination to the Supreme Court, then making “pre-emptive strikes” telling Republicans they better not say anything bad or personal about Democratic nominees.

Even his “lifetime” push for healthcare reform, yet not allowing Americans to have access to the same level of healthcare he enjoyed, or any other senator or representative.

The list could go on and on, but I am getting tired.  You get the picture.  Acknowledge him for what he was, a very flawed man who deserves some respect for his achievements, but is hardly a “great” man by any measure and should not be deified as some would want.

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By truedigger3, August 27, 2009 at 6:14 pm Link to this comment

Re:Amon Drool, August 27 at 8:25 pm #

This what jmr wrote describing prole, liecatcher and me after attacking our “unhinged” posts:“They point to individuals who are very old, very ugly, very lonely, or all the above, who throw their pitiful stink bombs to get noticed”
Then he agreed with hippie4ever that they should leave truthdig and seek another site.
I just fully expressed my opinion that I will not miss their posts. I didn’t ask them to leave!!.

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By Amon Drool, August 27, 2009 at 5:25 pm Link to this comment

TD3…u know this is a public forum.  on the last couple of threads i’ve been on with u, you’ve told people to buzz off this site and not let the door hit ‘em in the ass.  if u, me and liecatcher were hanging out someplace and and someone like jmr came into our personal space and told us we were unhinged, i’d have no problem telling him to buzz off.  but this is a public forum.  if someone is rude, i have no problem with returning it in kind.  but, from my pov, telling someone to buzz off because u disagree with them ain’t cool.  and i think hippieforever is a plus to this site.

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By Susan, August 27, 2009 at 4:49 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Ourabourus -  I have to agree with you about the vitriolic venom that is turning up on this blog - one of the reasons I usually don’t (blog). As for the Kennedys in politics, they emulated humanity - Human Beings - imperfect, but striving at least to assist those less fortunate than themselves. 
This is true of only a handful of today’s politicians
and I think it is high time we moved in the direction of some semblance of humanity, if we can refocus on what that concept embraces…....

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By truedigger3, August 27, 2009 at 4:37 pm Link to this comment

Re:y zack, August 27 at 12:26 pm #

I agree with you that obesity is a serious problem and should be addressed, but that is a big issue that should involve food companies, education and national campaign through the media which is not easy and if it succeeds it will take a long time to materialize like what happened with cigarettes.
The biggest obstacle to teach the people to eat sensibly is that it will reduce corporate profits and there will be a lot resistance to it.
But as I said previously, lifestyle is only small part of the problem, and we should, as good nation and people, have health care systm that take care of eveyone.

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By truedigger3, August 27, 2009 at 4:16 pm Link to this comment

jmr & heppie4ever,

I am glad that you are looking for another site. Your opinionated valueless opinions and comments will not be missed at all.
Don’t let the door hit your asses real hard.

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By truedigger3, August 27, 2009 at 4:06 pm Link to this comment

Re:By Big B, August 27 at 9:01 am,

Well said Big B. You make a lot of sense.

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By NABNYC, August 27, 2009 at 4:04 pm Link to this comment

It’s not clear why some posters seem obsessed with Ted Kennedy’s diet or weight.  I believe he lived longer than his life expectancy, so apparently neither diet nor weight caused an early death.  As far as we know, there is no connection between the brain tumor that killed him and diet or weight.  He was 77 years old.  Not everyone makes it to 90.  He lived along life.  Why attack him now and suggest that he brought about an early death by his eating habits?  It’s just such a biazarre and obviously untrue accusation.

Besides, there’s no point in attacking people for their diet.  Look at the corporations that push this crap on the public.  If you want to do something to improve food and health, educate yourself then educate the public, then shut down these corporate food machines.

The truth is that our entire food system has been taken over by corporations, like Monsanto, which are genetically modifying the basic food and seeds of the earth—the stuff what God made—and turning it into cheap starch and sugar which they then sell to the whole world at an enormous profit. 

Nutrition is gone, sugar and starch are all that’s left.  You want to know why there’s such an increase in obesity and adult-onset diabetes:  sugar and starch is now the mainstay of the American diet.  With a lot of fat to wash it down.

But this is corporate control of food.  Look at the CEOs.  Look at the U.S. government which takes bribes from these corporations and allows them to destroy the real food from the earth and replace it with patented plastic-food that is killing us all.

Educate yourself.  Your jokes aren’t funny.  You just sound stupid.  Start here: 

http://nabnyc.blogspot.com/2009/07/future-of-food-agri-business-is-killing_08.html

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By doublestandards/glasshouses, August 27, 2009 at 2:59 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

This is the youtube video which is no longer at
talkingpointsmemo.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SicFn8rqPPE

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By Amon Drool, August 27, 2009 at 2:13 pm Link to this comment

jmr…in what way are liecatcher’s posts ‘unhinged.”  one can quibble about his characterization of scheer’s column as deification.  and one can say that it was insensitive of him, at this time, to bring up one’s personal responsibility for one’s own health.  but unhinged…come on.  from what i’ve seen of your posts, you seem to be playing the gatekeeper of how far “left” one can go…good luck with that.

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By doublestandards/glasshouses, August 27, 2009 at 1:12 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

This is why they called him a lion.
http://www.talkingpointsmemo.com  Scroll 3/4 of the
way down the left side of the page to “Remembering the
man you mourn.”  Click on “watch it.”  This ain’t Obama
talkin.

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By StuartH, August 27, 2009 at 11:21 am Link to this comment

Here are a few photos by a photographer in Austin, Tx who has worked since
he returned home from Vietnam where he served as a medic, to use his camera
to expose the need for social justice. 

These are photos of Ted Kennedy taken in Austin and in Washington at
fundraisers for the always struggling progressive news magazine, the Texas
Observer. 

Kennedy could easily have said that this was too small a deal for him, or that
he didn’t have time.  Probably, he really didn’t.  He could have just gone sailing. 
But this is the side of Kennedy that the world mostly ignored.  He was always
ready to support other people’s causes and did the work that most people are
content to complain is too hard. 

He was a genuine American.  We would all do well to emulate his forthright and
clear stances, his courage and his hard working efforts on behalf of many
others. 

http://www.documentaryphotographs.com

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By zack, August 27, 2009 at 9:26 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Truedigger3,
While people can get sick for many reasons, obesity is now the #1 killer in the US, overtaking smoking 5 years ago http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/6438.php

Supposedly we spend $147 billion a year on obesity related illness, which I believe is enough to cover the various government health care proposals.
http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/causes/economics.html

I propose that the government stop subsidizing all foods, and that health care advocates direct more of their efforts towards education and public awareness of the impact of obesity, and how to live a healthy lifestyle. While this is not a cure-all, if we could reduce obesity by 25% it would have a huge (no pun intended) impact on society.

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By liecatcher, August 27, 2009 at 9:17 am Link to this comment

Remembering the Real Deal Posted on Aug 25, 2009 By
Robert Scheer


To: truedigger3, August 27 at 5:30 am

Hey truedigger3:

Thanks for the correction!!!!!!!!

It was ignorance rather than arrogance. I’m just a
common person trying to

get by the best I can. It was an oversight omitting
the primary

importance of a safe & healthy environment.

I guess you saw: “The unhinged posts of liecatcher
and truedigger3 are

so similar, that I wonder if they come from the same
dittohead. ” posted

by JMR.  It’s all too common to blame the victims
rather than the predators.

When I tried to find the definition of dittohead,
here is what I discovered.

“Word not found in the Dictionary and
Encyclopedia.redirected from Dittoheads.”

“Jargon of The Rush Limbaugh Show”

“Rush Limbaugh uses his own on-air jargon on his
radio show, The Rush Limbaugh Show,

some of which he invented and some of which he
merely popularized. Most are distorted

versions of names. All terms are from Limbaughs’s
radio program unless otherwise cited. “

Rush is the number one venom spewer in the world &
earns about $37million/year.

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By jmr, August 27, 2009 at 8:57 am Link to this comment

Oroborus, which sites do you recommend for good discussion?  I used to like The New Republic, but it became an echo chamber, like the Kos.  And this one…well, you see my previous post.

TeresaInPA, I agree that Ted Kennedy made the wrong choice in endorsing Obama, but I don’t think there was personal animus behind it.  Ted wasn’t a bearer of grudges.  Hillary might have made a splendid president, but she ran a horrible campaign, and how you run a campaign speaks to how you would run your administration.  This isn’t foolproof.  History is so full of bad guesses about how a candidate will turn out that one can only read the tea leaves, and the organizational tea leaves are how one runs his or her campaign.

I, too, thought Kennedy, the media and other Obamaphiles were drinking the Kool Aid, and I’m not at all gratified that my doubts about Obama are being validated, though to judge him at this stage in his presidency is a bit precious.  Hey, he’s still miles ahead of any Repug!

Anyway, I wonder if, given the old connection, Ted was playing Sinatra to Obama’s Sammy Davis. wink

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By jmr, August 27, 2009 at 8:17 am Link to this comment

Politics is a dirty business, not so much because of the politicians but the mean, stupid, vulgar constituencies they must endure.

Some of the posts on this thread illustrate the maxim that you judge a man by looking at his enemies.  I wonder if prole cut-and-pasted his venom from elsewhere or whether it all came from his reptilian brain.  The unhinged posts of liecatcher and truedigger3 are so similar, that I wonder if they come from the same dittohead.  These and others, with their nasty, mean-spirited posts, prove that there’s not much difference between left and right at the lunatic fringes.  They point to individuals who are very old, very ugly, very lonely, or all the above, who throw their pitiful stink bombs to get noticed.

And they succeed, but not like they think; for they cause us to appreciate the sea of sewage upon which Ted and John and Robert had to sail to make life a little more decent for the poor and underprivileged.

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By hippie4ever, August 27, 2009 at 8:11 am Link to this comment

Ouroborus, I see it too, and agree with you. I’ve mostly abandoned this site
because the posters are semi-hysterical and rude. There’s no excuse for it, except
the weakness of their positions and their needy desperation. My “favourite” are
those who ask for evidence, then reject said evidence when confronted with the
fatuousness of their point of view.

Oh well, there are other blogs…

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By Big B, August 27, 2009 at 6:01 am Link to this comment

TeresainPA

I would like to remind you that is was a gutless and soul-less clinton dynasty that continually copitulated to right wing scum and wall street toadies, and ultimately helped steer the ship USA into the goddamn iceberg. Hilary was the evil queen behind the throne, and she will never be anything but a second banana.

As for poor Teddy, let’s face it, he was the living representation of everything that is wrong with our capitalism based republic. No one that is not wealthy, or has the backing of a wealthy benefactor, can ever hope to govern. The kennedy’s, and other people like them, are the american substitutes for the royal families that we supposedly left europe to escape. For we poor schmucks out here in real america cannot, or refuse, to govern ourselves, so we have entrusted our fates to a class of wealthy, connected people who have never known the tribulations of living paycheck to paycheck, of making a choice between food and prescription drugs. How can we possibly expect empathy from a class of people who don’t know how to turn on a vaccuum, or don’t know what a bar code reader is(remember GHW Bush?)

I don’t want to piss on Teddy too much, but lets face it, the only difference between a neo-con tool like John Boehner and a Ted Kennedy is that Boehner will drive his limo by you close enough to splash mud on you, and Ted would stop his limo, get out, give you a moist towelette, get back in the limo and drive away, and forget he ever met you.

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By TeresaInPa, August 27, 2009 at 4:45 am Link to this comment

In 2008, Ted Kennedy endorsed Barack Obama over Hillary Clinton in the Democratic Primary. I think it was his finest moment. Even though Obama has turned out to be such a disappointment, at the time he seemed to be a much a better choice than Hillary Clinton.

It was his worst moment and the only reason Obama seemed like a better choice to you is because you were drinking the kool aid and listening to the lies rather than looking at the evidence.  But the majority of democrats knew better and voted for Hillary.  Unfortunately even Kennedy joined in the hyperbole and lies.. pretending Hillary had insulted his brothers and his family when he knew better, just as Black preachers and politicians knew better than to accuse the Clintons of racism.

Now we are all paying for it because Obama is turning out to just what many of us predicted.  He is an empty suit who knows how to run sleazy campaigns but not how to govern and he has no real political philosophy except that he wants to be re elected.

I wish Kennedy had not gotten involved in the primaries.  I tend to believe it was because he wanted his family to be the only democratic political dynasty.  I also think that the Clintons are too independent and not part of the snooty uppercrusty old DC society and “just not our sort of people Darling”, and not puppet like enough for Kennedy and Kerry.
I wish all this had not happened because then today I would not be feeling so disappointed and unfortunately emotionless about Kennedy’s death.

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By ardee, August 27, 2009 at 4:00 am Link to this comment

Outraged, August 27 at 1:24 am #

I simply had to comment on this excellent and heartfelt post. Great job, thank you for it.

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By Ouroborus, August 27, 2009 at 3:37 am Link to this comment

The vitriol on this thread is offensive. Most of it
sounds like one has been personally
insulted/assaulted by Kennedy himself. Articulation;
the skilled use of the English language has gone in
the toilet and been replaced by emotional, irrational
outbursts better suited to the gutter. Robert
Scheer’s opinion has been insulted in the most
egregious ways. Your opinions are superior only in
the caves of your deepest suppressions and you insult
yourselves; not the honest opinions of others who
happen to disagree with you. I post on many sites and
this one, with exceptions, is the poorest in self
expression and the use of foul language; mistaken for
elloquence and articulation.

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By truedigger3, August 27, 2009 at 2:30 am Link to this comment

liecatcher wrote:
“to be healthy is to live healthy. Lifestyle is
everything.”

You are flat out wrong. Many people get sick for many reasons, lifestyle is only one of them.
There are cccupational illnesses like workig in mines or chemical plants or spraying pestcides.
There is tha bad luck of inheriting a bad gene.
Living in polluted areas, eating and drinking polluted or contaminated food or water.
There are wars (agent orange, Gulf war synrome and enriched uranium explosives).
Catching a nasty viruses or germs at no fault of the individual.
There are accidents and many more reasons etc etc.

Be on guard.!! With all your “perfect and healthy lifesyle” you might get hit with a serious illness.
That might have the advantage of teaching you a good lesson, himility and toning down your arrogance.

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By truedigger3, August 27, 2009 at 1:58 am Link to this comment

heppie4everwrote:
“I hope this enlightens you but somehow I doubt it:”

The list you provided is nice icings on a cake. But where is the REAL cake which is REALLY working for REAL economic and social justice besides giving eloquent and moving speeches.
Where is his opposition to outsourcing of jobs and the gradual errosion of the middle class.?
Where is his voice against the crooks of Wall St. and their bail-outs and obscene compensation packages.?

Ted Kennedy supported Obama knowing very well who is the REAL Obama is.
Where is his voice for peace and against aggression and the bloated DOD budgets.
Many of the legislations you mentioned have sounding names but no teeth or very weak teeth. For example, you mentioned :“Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996”. What that law did? Till this very day you cannot carry any type of insurance from job to job or from policy to policy.
You didn’t mention his shameful support for “no child left behind” law of GW Bush.!

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By Outraged, August 27, 2009 at 1:26 am Link to this comment

Re: liecatcher

Do you seriously believe that illnesses are the fault of their victim?  And also, where do you place genetic disorders in your sterile orderly universe?

From your post, I could undenibly and plausibly make the case that “you need your head examined”.  But hey, maybe it’s genetic and not YOUR FAULT.

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By liecatcher, August 27, 2009 at 12:58 am Link to this comment

Remembering the Real Deal By Robert Scheer Posted
on Aug 25, 2009  


I’ve written many blogs about the healthcare hoax
because it’s a truism that the only way

to be healthy is to live healthy. Lifestyle is
everything. We can’t buy health in a bottle

or at building. And yet the brainwashing continues
that it’s all about money, being

able to afford healthcare insurance instead of
learning how to help ourselves. Using

nicotine, caffeine, alcohol,other legal & illegal
drugs as well as glutony are sure

paths to an early grave. Even without looking at the
early pictures of Ted Kennedy

it is obvious that he doubled in size & being more
than 150 lbs. overweight was

certainly morbidly obese. We will never know his real
medical history, or cause of

death, & we don’t need to. But like a 300 lb. friend
who has 50% heart function,

we can’t fool mother nature. Do you see Mike
Huckabee’s picture on every

diabetes public service announcement? Of course not,
there is too much profit

in obesity to stress prevention. So much so in fact
that obesity onset diabetics

are treated for diabetes & Wilford Brimley , a 300
plus pounder , along with other

attractive obese ethnic shills promote companies
selling diabetic supplies.

By not treating the obesity, blindness & amputations
are a likely consequence,

as well as an early grave. Heart disease & other
ailments result from obesity as well.

So for those bloggers who call for passage of a
“good” healthcare bill to honor

T.K’s memmory, I say make him a poster child for how
not to live. Yul Brynner

had a public service announcement antismoking video
played posthumously

until the tobacco interests stopped it.

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Outraged's avatar

By Outraged, August 26, 2009 at 10:24 pm Link to this comment

Re: OzarkMichael

Your comment: “There are times when a human being must be a human being, aware of our own faults and finiteness. I know some of the Senator’s faults. I know of my own, too. What of them?

There are times when our common humanity overshadows our disagreements and faults. Some of the people posting here dont understand that.”

Very well put, Thank you.

When I heard the news of Sen. Kennedy’s passing, I found it difficult to express my feelings regarding it, which is why I chose to quote Durant.  I have never met Sen. Kennedy, but I have read here and here again of his perspective.  Very grievously, I have attempted to find a reasonable “position” at which to address this sadness.

On the one hand, I could politically use this for my own ends, on the other hand I could acknowledge what he stood for, and against…. as a finite human being, like the rest of us.  This is what we are, simply mere mortals in a vast universe.

Throughout the day, I have engaged many vantage points and considered the very real humanitarian spirit of Sen. Kennedy.  I have thought long and hard, attempting to ascertain what his thoughts may have been, or his wishes, if you will…. regarding what HE would have chosen to be HIS legacy, HIS person and HIS life’s work and what would have been HIS wishes as to the course we should take.

As an atheist, I have entertained my perspective.  In this, I would have wanted all my life’s work and thought and deeds to be recognized for what they were and in fact are.  But Sen. Kennedy, like his brothers before him were not atheists like me.

So I took what I know of him and his family’s beliefs to heart.  And I supposed that we are not so very different as some claim.  I took all these things…... and I thought, I debated, I rationalized, I cared, and I loved.

In both instances, I arrived at very same conclusion.  I am not Sen. Kennedy, and he… not me.  But still there existed an overriding premise…. that “thing” which is apart and separate of “him or me” and it is in this premise, I offer this consideration.

If I had spent a measurable amount of, not only my career and my life…. but also my family to make a better way, a better life… for those who’ve NOT experienced my privileges, for those who’ve NOT had my education, for those who’ve NOT understood what it means to lose two brothers in this same endeavor and for those who’ve NOT understood what it means to be me, surely I have stood for absolutely nothing.

But the Kennedys did and do fight.  Sen. Kennedy fought.  This whole family…. FOUGHT.  They continue, along with myself, and many others to fight.  They have lost loved ones and know this pain…. yet still, have fought as well as any soldier dares.

So it is in this regard, I WILL FIGHT… to see through that which is distained by the ignorant fringe and exploited by monied interests…., and will, not only for my current fellow citizens but for those to follow… unequivocally pursue Sen. Kennedy’s dream of healthcare for all. This battle is not only for Sen. Kennedy’s sake, as he himself has shown… but for his brethen and his countrymen, and for those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice to attain it.

We will see Sen. Kennedy’s dream of healthcare for all.  A long and hard fought battle will not go unappreciated.

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By dan m ketter, August 26, 2009 at 6:43 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

So much to do about nothing. Here’s a guy who should just now be being released from prison for vehicular homicide, leaving the scene and drowning of a victim who was pregnant with his kid.
Couple that with his drunken rowdiness and unwanted touching of female patrons with Chris Doods at every bar in Georgetown.
Who allowed a rape to happen under his roof in Florida.
This guy belongs in potter field with no marker just as we honor any other drunk on skid row

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LostHills's avatar

By LostHills, August 26, 2009 at 6:32 pm Link to this comment

A good and fitting farewell from Robert Scheer, who is performing a great public service by bringing us this site, and who actually knew the man. Ted Kennedy was a human being with as many flaws as the rest of us. He didn’t have to stay in the Senate for forty years, but he did He stood for something and he made a difference. I think the best measure of the man is in the hatred and vitriol spewed upon him by the right wing propaganda squads on talk radio. They saw him as one of their worst enemies and that means that he was doing a lot of things right and being effective. I’m working class, and the working class is not well represented in congress. We just lost one of the best friends we ever had. Whether he was perfect, or not….

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By liecatcher, August 26, 2009 at 6:29 pm Link to this comment

Remembering the Real Deal By Robert Scheer Posted
on Aug 25, 2009

Hey Robert Scheer :

I have no problem with your deificaion of Ted
Kennedy, but I was shocked & disappointed when you
said:

“Hopefully, it will be added to Ted Kennedy’s legacy
that he was right about Obama, just as he was

consistently right on every major issue that he dealt
with as a senator. Kennedy’s endorsement of Obama

was critical to our current president’s historic
nomination and election, and it is therefore fitting
that the

favor of that all-important endorsement be returned
with a significant reform of the ailing U.S. health
care system.”

This comment by:

By NABNYC, August 26 at 7:44 pm

“In 2008, Ted Kennedy endorsed Barack Obama over
Hillary Clinton in the Democratic Primary.

I think it was his finest moment. Even though Obama
has turned out to be such a disappointment,

at the time he seemed to be a much a better choice
than Hillary Clinton.”

is an honest & accurate observation.

Your disingenuous comment is particularly painful
because of all the the deaths Obama is

responsible for, not to mention the fact that he is
complicit in the destruction & enslavement

of America by pushing us off the precipice into a
debtor’s abyss from which their is no escape.

Where were you when Bush 3 surrounded himself with
Government Sachs & Bernanke sent

$trillions to the European cabal with arrogance &
impunity?  Bernanke was not only given carte

blanche, but reappointed to continued the predation.

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By hippie4ever, August 26, 2009 at 5:22 pm Link to this comment

“Yes, he gave eloquent speeches but some one enlighten me, please, about his
legislative accomplishment defending the common people.”—truedigger3

I hope this enlightens you but somehow I doubt it:

the Protection and Advocacy for Mentally Ill Individuals Act of 1986, the
Nutrition
Labeling and Education Act of 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990, the Ryan White
Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act of 1990, the National Institutes
of Health
Revitalization Act of 1993, the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act of
1994, the Health
Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, the Food and Drug
Administration
Modernization Act of 1997, the creation of the Children’s Health Insurance
Program (CHIP) in
1997 (“HIPAA”), the Children’s Health Act of 2000, the Project BioShield Act of
2003, the
Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act of 2005, the FDA Amendments
Act of 2007, and the
Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008.

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By NABNYC, August 26, 2009 at 4:44 pm Link to this comment

Ted Kennedy: With Muffled Drum, Bring Out The Coffin. Let The Mourners Come. He Is Dead

Ted Kennedy died last night at the age of 77. He was known as the Lion of the Senate, where he served with great distinction for many decades.

Ted Kennedy was the youngest of the brothers of his generation, and lost all three of his brothers at relatively young ages. His oldest brother, Joe, died in World War II in service to this country. His brother John became President of the United States and was assassinated.  His brother Robert was also assassinated.  The “official” version of both murders remains suspect.

As his brothers died or were murdered, Ted Kennedy became surrogate father to his nieces and nephews, walking the girls down the aisle in weddings, providing comfort and solice for each new family tragedy.

Despite his personal problems, Ted Kennedy became the most important liberal and progressive politician in the Senate, due not to family wealth, but to hard work. He was firmly committed to traditional Democratic Party principles of standing up for working people, for the poor, for women, against racism. He supported a national healthcare program.

In 2008, Ted Kennedy endorsed Barack Obama over Hillary Clinton in the Democratic Primary. I think it was his finest moment. Even though Obama has turned out to be such a disappointment, at the time he seemed to be a much a better choice than Hillary Clinton.

Ted Kennedy spoke out against the war in Vietnam, and voted against the war in Iraq. He came out in support of Obama, and stood against Clinton, choosing to end his career by standing up for his principles, just as he had done throughout his life.

Ted Kennedy was a terrific guy. His death is an enormous loss for progressives and for working people in this country.

The New York Times has a lengthy obituary, and I’m sure his life and death will be exhaustively covered by all the media. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/27/us/politics/27kennedy.html?_r=1&hp;
“Funeral Blues,” by W.H. Auden (1936)

Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the message the sky: He Is Dead.
Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was my North, my South, my East and West,
My working week and my Sunday rest,
My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
I thought love would last for ever: I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now; put out every one:
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
Pour away the ocean and sweep away the woods:
For nothing now can come to any good.

Over the next few days, all over this country, all over the world, in many small towns, there will be masses held for Ted Kennedy. Click the link below for my contribution, a portion of a mass, in tribute to this great man whose loss I mourn: Agnus Dei from Beethoven’s “Missa Solemnis,” Berlin Philharmonic.

http://NABNYC.blogspot.com

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By truedigger3, August 26, 2009 at 4:06 pm Link to this comment

Kennedy took Obama under his wing in the Senate and very strongly supported his nomination for the presidency.
That is not the action of a “man of the people”. Definitely he knew who the real Obama is years before us unwashed masses.
He supported the genocidal embargo against Iraq and either supported or looked the other way ignoring Israel criminal actions.
He supported “no child left behind” law by W Bush which is gradually ruining public education in the poor neighbourhoods.
I don’t recall he was a voice for peace in the world.
Did he vote against Wall St. bail-outs.?
Yes, he gave eloquent speeches but some one enlighten me, please, about his legislative accomplishment defending the common people.

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skmacksk's avatar

By skmacksk, August 26, 2009 at 3:30 pm Link to this comment

The last of the Holy Family is now gone. Along with any delusion that may have accompanied their ascendancy,except for the romanticizing press and their obsessive pandering to a dream unrealized and its flawed actors. Mr. Sheer is as much a victim as practitioner of this sycophancy,now practiced by Network Reporters and Pundits whose access to the powerful is of utmost concern and moment. The blogs are awash in ‘The Lion of the Senate ’ shit: Mr.Sheer where is your sharply honed critical facility?In hock to the Democratic Party.

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By sid, August 26, 2009 at 2:55 pm Link to this comment

As the Republicrats in Washington continue to govern a country of, for, and by the Corporations, I salute Ted Kennedy for not forgetting what is a mere afterthought in that town - the people.  His voice will be missed.  Rest in peace.

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By cbaron, August 26, 2009 at 2:45 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

A great testimony to Teddy. Thanks, Bob.

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By Angel Gabriel, August 26, 2009 at 2:05 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

The end of a Legacy dedicated to human rights and peace.
Ted was human therefore succeptible to the same temptations that his position left him exposed to - yes he made mistakes, who among you have not? How you cynical and downright hateful people can denegrate this man only shows me the depth of curdled hatred that lies beneath the American Society. It is breath taking!
It was the same depths of curdled hatred that shot both his brothers for their own beliefs in equal rights for all people. They were the last of the era of representation for the people and you will come to miss them when your own kind turn on you and you are trampled under foot like the waste products on an Animal Farm.
This is a partiucularly sad moment in American History with Teddy’s passing - there’s one less strong voice to speak out against this Caucophony of Fundamentalist hatred that is strangling the life out of America. May your vitriol turn to acid in your mouths and forever silence you! Just Imagine that beautiful silence that would follow…

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By freedom loving american, August 26, 2009 at 1:44 pm Link to this comment

Ted was a man, only a man.  Not gutless gutter slime filth like those republicans that hated him. Remember he was a man.

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By phreedom, August 26, 2009 at 1:06 pm Link to this comment

Thank you Robert,

I would sum up my experience with Senator Kennedy with; “Everyone was somebody to this man”.  And you know, I only spoke to him twice in 20 years. A couple of instances lasting a few seconds, moments some 10 years apart, but each somehow an isolated & private occurrence, both a simple exchange of greetings, I said; “Hello” and he said, “Hello”(right back at me, like I was the only person he knew on the planet). Anyone who has had this experience with Senator Edward Kennedy knows what I am talking about.

The first time, I was at a Tufts University graduation, taking pictures of a friend who had just graduated, and Senator Kennedy strolled by me, I said; “Hello”, and he returned the greeting as if he was familiar with me. You see, I never felt that I deserved to be at Tufts, not smart enough, certainly not affluent enough, and I was pretty sure I would not attend my own graduation, from Tufts, the following year. Suddenly, when hearing him return my greeting, I felt as if Senator Kennedy was assuming I lived a life not unlike his, I was astonished at how settled I became, I thought, “how could this be”, which began to change to, “why the heck not”. Somehow, this man conveyed a message of welcome & connectedness I had not experienced before. In that instance, I started to change the way I had experienced & interpreted the struggle I had while at Tufts, I began to understand it better. 

20 years later, while jogging past the Harvard Club, I nearly ran into Senator Kennedy, I think I might have winged his suit jacket, I turned and backed peddled, again, saying; “hello”, and gosh darn, there was his “hello”, again, unchanged, just as familiar with me as that day 10 years earlier at Tufts. It just so happened, that once again, I was at a crossroad in my life, but this time caught in a crossfire of a business deal gone bad, and very strong misgivings about the business world in general, again that I did not fit in, again asking myself, how stupid could I have been?, is there any other way to do this life?, but there was that “Hello” again from Senator Kennedy.

28 years ago I did attend my graduation ceremony at Tufts, and 20 years ago I left the business world(in the conventional sense) and set out on a path of activism and writing, to try and make things a little bit more fair and just for more people.  I do not worry about the degree to which I may make an impact or how many people might benefit from my activities, since I know that just a few seconds in 20 years can make such a difference.  I think strongly that a potent activism is simply saying hello to people who seem unlike us, to those who have less than us, to those that may not give us some advantage, to those that appear to judge us, or to those who may seem fearful or suspicious of us. I always look forward to the opportunity to return the greeting to a person who has taken this risk, and has offered this simple greeting to me. 

My wife remembers, when she was a special needs teacher some 30 years ago, that Senator Kennedy went out of his way to ask her; “what is it like being a special needs teacher”. The manner in which he approached my wife and greeted her, well,  to this day remains one of the most important moments in her life. She told me the story again today, in tears, when she learned of the Senator’s passing.

Senator Kennedy has done some great things, and I am thankful and admire these accomplishments that have safeguarded our society in many difficult times, but for me, it is this sense that I have of him, personally, that the proper premise for all of us to work from, to operate from, is one that presupposes that every person counts, everyone is somebody, no one gets sacrificed, and nobody gets left behind.

Rhuen Phreed
11 Marlborough Street
Boston, MA

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OzarkMichael's avatar

By OzarkMichael, August 26, 2009 at 1:02 pm Link to this comment

There are times when a human being must be a human being, aware of our own faults and finiteness. I know some of the Senator’s faults. I know of my own, too. What of them?

There are times when our common humanity overshadows our disagreements and faults. Some of the people posting here dont understand that. Bringing in Bush bashing or Israel bashing or Left bashing or Right bashing just isnt called for.

Perhaps in their reflection some on the Left will find a renewed commitment to their causes. Let them do so and do not disturb them.

Today we remember an American politician who tried to be true to his principles over a very long time of public service.

In the next week, in future issue-oriented truthdig articles, we can go back to fighting like cats and dogs.

RIP Senator. I disagreed with you much of the time… but you had, and always will have, my respect.

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By cognitis1, August 26, 2009 at 12:43 pm Link to this comment

Ted Kennedy along with his brothers never demonstrated
any capacity for anything other than exploiting his
father’s ill-gotten-gains from drug dealing and insider
trading, and all Kennedys entered politics not as a
sacrifice for public benefit but rather as a duty for
the family’s corruption. Ted Kennedy along with all
other politicians accepted bribes from corporate
lobbyists, injured the public for personal and
corporate benefit, and appointed or assisted family
members to public offices.

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By ardee, August 26, 2009 at 12:31 pm Link to this comment

Russian Paul, August 26 at 3:03 pm #

Might I suggest that you control your vitriol long enough to research the record of Edward Kennedy’s 47 years of public service. He was called “The Lion of the Senate” for good reason.

The man was a true champion for the rights of children, the elderly, working families and the poor. Further he was a true bipartisan who was perhaps the best man in the Senate at working across the aisle and hammering out legislation.

He, like all of us, had his warts, used his power and his family not always for the best interests of justice perhaps but, on balance, his record is a great one and undeserving of the spitefulness of petty people. (and yours as well).

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Eric L. Prentis's avatar

By Eric L. Prentis, August 26, 2009 at 12:16 pm Link to this comment

Sen. Ted Kennedy, an effective, true political leaded who is deeply missed, I venerate your name and honored position in US and world history.

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Russian Paul's avatar

By Russian Paul, August 26, 2009 at 12:09 pm Link to this comment

I’m getting really sick of your bullshit Scheer. Have you always been a
brownnosing, pseudo-liberal spin doctor or have the years just caught up with
you? I know the “liberal” community is in mourning, but that doesn’t mean you
can’t be a little more trenchant in your analysis here instead of succumbing to the
usual ass-kissery.

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By Al Franken, August 26, 2009 at 12:07 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Good riddance libtard.  Have fun explaining to God why you served the party of Satan your entire life.

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Russian Paul's avatar

By Russian Paul, August 26, 2009 at 12:03 pm Link to this comment

“Kennedy was a rare sane voice among the Democrats in strongly opposing the
Iraq war, and it is no small tribute when he states: `We know the record of Barack
Obama. There is the courage he showed when so many others were silent or
simply went along…’ ”

Give me a break. There is nothing courageous about speaking out against one of
the most unpopular wars we’ve ever had when it’s politically convenient. Now
elected, Obama seems determined to stay in Iraq until after the next election. And
Kennedy had no problem supporting the expansion of the AfPak war under
Obama. Or his expanded use of mercenary forces. He was just another conniving
politician, playing the stalwart liberal, but always serving corporate interests.

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By b t, August 26, 2009 at 12:01 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

I say good riddance.
And, it is too damn bad the sob had to die to leave Congress.

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By wagonjak, August 26, 2009 at 11:02 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

FORGET ALL THE PIOUS TRIBUTES!

The one thing our pathetic, posturing politicians can do to honor the memory
of Edward Kennedy is to PASS A HEALTH CARE BILL WITH A STRONG PUBLIC
OPTION!!!!

All the rest is hypocritical bullshit!

C’mon Dem Senators and Representatives, step up and push this through
NOW!!!!!

If you fail at this, your party will lose any relevance and will go down to defeat
in the next two elections!

Everyone should read the wonderful rant by Hunter down the thread at KOS!

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By jmr, August 26, 2009 at 11:01 am Link to this comment

Of course, should read, “...the pusillaninous Democratic lambs, who don’t have a principle they’d not sell down the river to stay in office…”

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By jmr, August 26, 2009 at 10:37 am Link to this comment

Ted Kennedy’s greatest moments were when he manned the battlements against the depredations of a GOP bent on dismantling a government which had afforded protections for the less privileged and benefits, such as they were, for working Americans.  It’s tragic that he could not see his hopes for universal healthcare realized in his lifetime.

Sure, Kennedy did things that riled me, such as the privileged positions in immigration quotas he got for the Irish, which I guess one might call cinstituent service at the expense of the equality he was always preaching.  But for one who has grown disgusted at the pusillaninous Democratic lambs, who don’t have a principle they’d sell down the river to stay in office, Kennedy seemed by contrast a lion of fortitude and perserverance.

I see, here, good illustrations of how the wingnuts of left and right converge.  Chappaquddick obsesses hate mongers, left and the right.  Ignoramuses who think they know what happened use this tragedy to “prove” Ted’s nefarious character, as they would trot out gossip about Bobby and Marilyn Monroe, and JFK and Judith Exner.

The Kennedys are the family America loves to hate.  I often think of John and Bobby as the modern day Gracchi brothers.  I recall the words of William Allen White about Woodrow Wilson, when I think about Truman, the Kennedys, Clinton, even Nixon, and the reptiles of both wings, and of course the insects of the media, who have tried to bring them low:

With calumny rampant around him, he tasted the ingratitude of his Republic—the statesman’s ancient cup of hemlock.  No wonder that, on the the high and empty altar where the flame of his fame was quenched and the cold, charred ashes were strewn, he lay helpless while the high priests of the temple cut out his heart.

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By Poops McGee, August 26, 2009 at 9:53 am Link to this comment

It is too bad that the day before Senator Kennedy died, the Americans in this video showed such a lack of compassion for fellow human beings. As the post says “the Republican moral majority shows their true colors.”

Must watch:

http://progressnotcongress.org/?p=2689

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By tdbach, August 26, 2009 at 9:06 am Link to this comment

Prole’s commentary is profoundly naïve, heavily biased by a few pet-peeve issues, and dripping with self righteousness.  Alas, so it is on “the internets.”

Just to take one of Prole’s issues: “Clinton’s genocidal sanctions on Iraq.” What were the options? A) Apply sanctions in hopes that either Hussein would alter his behavior or his rule would be undermined to the point of revolution; B) Overthrow the bastard and live with the consequences, ala GWB; or C) Let him do his thing like a festering cancer in one of the most volatile and (like it or not) critical areas of the world, ala Prole. I guess you choose your “genocide” because, one way or another, a lot of innocent people are going to die. I’d choose A, even if I didn’t feel very good about it.

Got any proof of Kennedy’s fealty to Israel besides defending its right to exist? Another complicated issue, but generally supporting Israel, while disagreeing with some of its actions (much as we support America while condemning some of what is done in America’s name), hardly qualifies one as lacking in principle.

Fanaticism accepts no nuance I guess.

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By Jon, August 26, 2009 at 7:45 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

I don’t even want to know what the right wing extremists on Fox, radio, and elsewhere are going to be saying today about this event.  There are a few of us who remember the dream of America becoming classy, well educated, healthy, fair to each other, instead what we see emerging these days.  Something doesn’t feel right.

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By artie, August 26, 2009 at 7:22 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Typical politician, infatuated with the the six Congressional p’s: power, priviledge, perks, prestige, pay, and pension, and willing to do anything to be reelected. .

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By rokki, August 26, 2009 at 7:17 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Bobby.
Only you could get so much mileage out of quoting yourself.  A beautiful piece.

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By Rodger Lemonde, August 26, 2009 at 6:58 am Link to this comment

Those who judge a man after his death presume a great
deal above their station.

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By barbara fitzpatrick, August 26, 2009 at 6:25 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

It is a very sad day; as per above:  he wasn’t perfect, neither am I nor are you.  A hero isn’t someone whom due to some anomaly acts from perfection, but rather rises above their own human frailty to make a difference.  Goodbye Teddy, you did good.

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By eileen fleming, August 26, 2009 at 5:49 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

“Each time a person stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, these ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance. “—Robert F. Kennedy

Here’s HOPING Ted’s passing will help re-ignite THAT spirit in America.


   
“HOPE has two children. The first is ANGER at the way things are. The second is COURAGE to DO SOMETHING about it.”-St. Augustine


e
http://www.wearewideawake.org/

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Ouroborus's avatar

By Ouroborus, August 26, 2009 at 5:48 am Link to this comment

He was human; laud his accomplishments and judge his
failures. Only those that truly knew him, knew him; the
rest is the stuff of hearsay and gossip. I didn’t know
him so I can’t say.

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By mmadden, August 26, 2009 at 5:13 am Link to this comment

The author Robert Scheer has a low plateau for heros. Kennedy doesn’t warrant hero worship.

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By AS, August 26, 2009 at 5:10 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Thank You Mr. Sheer for your most inspiring tribute to Senator Kennedy! We all owe Senator Kennedy a profound Debt of Gratitude for all that he had done for the American people!
May God bless his soul; may he rest in peace!

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thebeerdoctor's avatar

By thebeerdoctor, August 26, 2009 at 4:49 am Link to this comment

Prole’s lengthy analysis gets to the hear of this newly dead legacy. As Voltaire once said: “to the dead one owes only the truth.”

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