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The Corporate State and the Subversion of Democracy

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Posted on May 31, 2008

By Chris Hedges

Note: Chris Hedges gave this keynote address on Wednesday, May 28, in Furman University’s Younts Conference Center. The address was part of protests by faculty and students over the South Carolina college’s decision to invite George W. Bush to give the May 31 commencement address.

When it was announced in May that President Bush would deliver the commencement address, 222 students and faculty signed and posted on the school’s Web site a statement titled “We Object.”  The statement cites the war in Iraq and the administration’s “obstructing progress on reducing greenhouse gases while favoring billions in tax breaks and subsidies to oil companies that are earning record profits.”

“We are ashamed of the actions of this administration. The war in Iraq has cost the lives of over 4,000 brave and honorable U.S. military personnel,” the statement read. “Because we love this country and the ideals it stands for, we accept our civic responsibility to speak out against these actions that violate American values.”


I used to live in a country called America.  It was not a perfect country, God knows, especially if you were African-American or Native American or of Japanese descent in World War II or poor or gay or a woman or an immigrant, but it was a country I loved and honored.  This country gave me hope that it could be better.  It paid its workers wages that were envied around the world.  It made sure these workers, thanks to labor unions and champions of the working class in the Democratic Party and the press, had health benefits and pensions.  It offered good public education.  It honored basic democratic values and held in regard the rule of law, including international law, and respect for human rights.  It had social programs from Head Start to welfare to Social Security to take care of the weakest among us, the mentally ill, the elderly and the destitute.  It had a system of government that, however flawed, was dedicated to protecting the interests of its citizens.  It offered the possibility of democratic change.  It had a media that was diverse and endowed with the integrity to give a voice to all segments of society, including those beyond our borders, to impart to us unpleasant truths, to challenge the powerful, to explain ourselves to ourselves.  I am not blind to the imperfections of this America, or the failures to always meet these ideals at home and abroad.  I spent 20 years of my life in Latin America, Africa, the Middle East and the Balkans as a foreign correspondent reporting in countries where crimes and injustices were committed in our name, whether during the Contra war in Nicaragua or the brutalization of the Palestinians by Israeli occupation forces.  But there was much that was good and decent and honorable in our country.  And there was hope.

The country I live in today uses the same words to describe itself, the same patriotic symbols and iconography, the same national myths, but only the shell remains.  America, the country of my birth, the country that formed and shaped me, the country of my father, my father’s father, and his father’s father, stretching back to the generations of my family that were here for the country’s founding, is so diminished as to be nearly unrecognizable.  I do not know if this America will return, even as I pray and work and strive for its return.  The “consent of the governed” has become an empty phrase.  Our textbooks on political science are obsolete.  Our state, our nation, has been hijacked by oligarchs, corporations and a narrow, selfish political elite, a small and privileged group which governs on behalf of moneyed interests.  We are undergoing, as John Ralston Saul wrote, “a coup d’etat in slow motion.”  We are being impoverished—legally, economically, spiritually and politically.  And unless we soon reverse this tide, unless we wrest the state away from corporate hands, we will be sucked into the dark and turbulent world of globalization where there are only masters and serfs, where the American dream will be no more than that—a dream, where those who work hard for a living can no longer earn a decent wage to sustain themselves or their families, whether in sweat shops in China or the decaying rust belt of Ohio, where democratic dissent is condemned as treason and ruthlessly silenced.

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I single out no party.  The Democratic Party has been as guilty as the Republicans. It was Bill Clinton who led the Democratic Party to the corporate watering trough.  Clinton argued that the party had to ditch labor unions, no longer a source of votes or power, as a political ally.  Workers, he insisted, would vote Democratic anyway.  They had no choice.  It was better, he argued, to take corporate money.  By the 1990s, the Democratic Party, under Clinton’s leadership, had virtual fundraising parity with the Republicans.  Today the Democrats get more.  In political terms, it was a success.  In moral terms, it was a betrayal. 

The North American Free Trade Agreement was sold to the country by the Clinton White House as an opportunity to raise the incomes and prosperity of the citizens of the United States, Canada and Mexico.  NAFTA would also, we were told, staunch Mexican immigration into the United States.

“There will be less illegal immigration because more Mexicans will be able to support their children by staying home,” President Clinton said in the spring of 1993 as he was lobbying for the bill.

But NAFTA, which took effect in 1994, had the curious effect of reversing every one of Clinton’s rosy predictions.  Once the Mexican government lifted price supports on corn and beans for Mexican farmers, they had to compete against the huge agribusinesses in the United States.  The Mexican farmers were swiftly bankrupted.  At least 2 million Mexican farmers have been driven off their land since 1994.  And guess where many of them went?  This desperate flight of poor Mexicans into the United States is now being exacerbated by large-scale factory closures along the border as manufacturers pack up and leave Mexico for the cut-rate embrace of China’s totalitarian capitalism.  But we were assured that goods would be cheaper.  Workers would be wealthier.  Everyone would be happier.  I am not sure how these contradictory things were supposed to happen, but in a sound-bite society, reality no longer matters.  NAFTA was great if you were a corporation.  It was a disaster if you were a worker.

Clinton’s welfare reform bill, which was signed on Aug. 22, 1996, obliterated the nation’s social safety net.  It threw 6 million people, many of them single mothers, off the welfare rolls within three years.  It dumped them onto the streets without child care, rent subsidies and continued Medicaid coverage.  Families were plunged into crisis, struggling to survive on multiple jobs that paid $6 or $7 an hour, or less than $15,000 a year.  But these were the lucky ones.  In some states, half of those dropped from the welfare rolls could not find work.  Clinton slashed Medicare by $115 billion over a five-year period and cut $25 billion in Medicaid funding.  The booming and overcrowded prison system handled the influx of the poor, as well as our abandoned mentally ill.  And today we stand in shame with 2.3 million of our citizens behind bars, most for nonviolent drug offenses.  More than one in 100 adults in the United States is incarcerated and one in nine black men ages 20 to 34 is behind bars.  The United States, with less than 5 per cent of the global population, has almost 25 percent of the world’s prisoners.


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By Bill Faren, May 31, 2008 at 8:48 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Any school that invites the Prez (or VP or just about any member of Congress) to speak at their graduation should have their accreditation yanked. Any student who shows up to the ceremony deserves the “education” they get.
It certainly doesn’t seem like schools have the nation’s (or planet’s) well-being in mind. It’s sadly obvious that too many are just functioning to maintain the status quo and benefit a few at the expense of many.
I’m off to TMZ. This stuff’s too heavy.
Kudos.

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By vstalick, May 31, 2008 at 7:59 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

This is the first time I have visited your site as a result of seeing you on Democracy Now.  This is an excellent site and I particularly enjoyed the speech by Chris Hedges whom I have admired for some time.  He is a true patriot and Christian.

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By Conservative Yankee, May 31, 2008 at 6:40 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Chris Hedges has substituted the word “Country” for the word “Nation” Personally I have always loved my “Country” but at the same time mis-trusted our “Nation”.

Hedges cites Bill Clinton for corporate coziness and abandonment of the “working poor” but hasn’t this been going on for longer than 16 years?  Wasn’t it Truman who used Taft Hartley 19 times in not so subtle attempts to break rail, mining and longshoreman’s unions? Wasn’t it Roosevelt who refused to sign “anti-lynching legislation? Wasn’t it Carter who (before Reagan) began the process of deregulation?

No, again in my opinion, Hedges gets it wrong when he cites “...champions of the working class in the Democratic Party.” In the Twentieth Century there were two presidents who (arguably) might be called “champions of the working class. One a Republican, the other a Democrat.

In my life I’ve seen abject poverty in the Democratic fiefdoms of New Jersey, New York, and Massachusetts. Admittedly this same kind of poverty exists in South Dakota, Oklahoma, and Florida. But to single out “Democrats” as somehow more moral, upstanding, or as advocates for the poor is a perfidy worthy of Senator Clinton.

We had a wealthy Blue-blood Republican Governor in Massachusetts in the late Sixties, and early Seventies. He closed the horrible ineffective “reform schools” and gave some poor children a second chance. He reformed the Commonwealth’s mid-evil prison system and demanded that incarcerated persons get the medical care they needed, and counseling services. this resulted in a decreased recidivism rate. He also set up state wide “councils for children” and had a portion of the seats reserved for “consumers of welfare services”. Under his administration the State Education system enacted “chapter 766” mandating the mainstreaming of handicapped children… the prototype for PL 94-142.

Frank Sargent was the reason I registered (in 1970) as a Republican.  I am sure he would be an Independent were he alive today.

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By troublesum, May 31, 2008 at 5:26 am Link to this comment

Oh my God, why didn’t I see it before?  Chris Hedges is a “bitter” person who “clings to religion.”  Let’s hope he doesn’t have a gun.

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By troublesum, May 31, 2008 at 5:07 am Link to this comment

In Obama-world Hedges wouldn’t be allowed to say these things because they’re “divisive” and definitely not nice.  We’re all part of one big happy family here whether we are an oil executive making $20 million a year or a waiter/waitress working for tips.  Isn’t family values what makes America great?  We’re all going to feel a lot better when Obama changes the drapes, the carpeting, the stationary, and the furniture.

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By Purple Girl, May 31, 2008 at 3:39 am Link to this comment

‘Once I was Blind and Now I SEE’
Having voted for Bill 2x’s, I admit being ‘Had’. But now hindisght has returned and see his ‘Presidency’ as nothing more then a continuation of the SCAM that has been being played on US for Decades.I thank Hillary for smacking those Rose Colored Galsses off my face (the ONLY thing I will Ever Thank her for).Her behavior while in the Senate and certainly Now on th eCampaign Trail has Revealed not only He rcomplicity with this Corp ‘New World Order’ bu talso her Husbands contributions. I despise Both Now. I’d noticed in recent years while watching CSPAN or any other Media covering Politicians- I would be surprised by the ‘D’following their names underneath- WHAT??Then i looked Up the members of the DLC. Funny how Gore /LIEbermann and Kerry?Edwards both caused me to hold my nose when I voted for them in the Elections- Now I know Why, My intution told me they were Not True Blue. Granted these Members of the Neo CONS in blue are not the only Traitors to our party and the Nation, Bu tI figure the rest are either already getting paid Well enough by the Corps or their ‘applications to the DLC’ have not yet been Accepted . Here’s a Revelation for the DNC to consider when deciding WHO is more Electable when it comes to Clinton or Obama-  2 rounds of DLC’ers Proved they can Not ‘Seal the Deal’ with the Dem Base!!!WE can Smell the Corp Stench comig from them a MILE AWAY!! Look Down Hillary your Red Logo’ed Slip is Showing!Orwell was a damn Prophet- year of inception of the DLC (covert Operatives) 1984!!! They got US to look away with the obvious Right ‘Moral Majority’ threat while proceeding with the Up Swing Punch from the ‘left’.A great Ploy of ‘Divide and Conquer’ stratedgy.
It’s the same thing they Hope to accomplish with this lastest ‘Dissentor’s’ ‘Tell All’ book. McClellan is still a Loyalist. He has thrown US a crumble to Hyper ‘analyze’ while in reality not reveal the real Motivation of the Con which led US into Iraq, and probably into Iran. Our Treasures Our Reputation and Ours (and far more Others) Blood is being Used for the Corp and foreign sponsors Oil Land Grab in the M.E. (and actually around the world). Bush Co’s crime is not Misguided Arrogance and Idealism- it is Corporate Imperialism. They’re Hope is tha tWhen charges are Levied against them (and they know something is coming) It is a mild Rebuke for such Ideological misadvnetures- Not for intentional Malice…Treason, War crimes and Crimes Agaisnt Humanity. They are hoping for a slap on the hands Now and a mere Blemish on their Historical record. Consider the lighter punishments which would be handed down for ‘Ignorance and arrogance’ as opposed to Reckless endangerment with forethought and Malice. Sorry Boys and Girls this Crumb of Scotty’s does not Suffice. But Good Try!

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