Top Leaderboard, Site wide
July 30, 2014
Truthdig: Drilling Beneath the Headlines
Help us grow by sharing
and liking Truthdig:
Sign up for Truthdig's Email NewsletterLike Truthdig on FacebookFollow Truthdig on TwitterSubscribe to Truthdig's RSS Feed

Newsletter

sign up to get updates








Truthdig Bazaar
Citizen Stan

Citizen Stan

By Patty Sharaf with Robert Scheer
$15.00

Bad Money

Bad Money

By Kevin Phillips
$17.13

more items

 
Ear to the Ground

Water Demand for Energy to Double by 2035

Email this item Email    Print this item Print    Share this item... Share

Posted on Jan 31, 2013
Argonne National Library (CC BY-NS-SA 2.0)

The amount of fresh water needed to produce energy for the world is set to double within the next 25 years as civilization’s reliance on coal and biofuels increases, the International Energy Agency (IEA) projects.

If today’s policies are maintained, the IEA calculates that water consumed for energy production would increase from 17.4 trillion gallons now to 35.6 trillion gallons annually by 2035.

That amount is equivalent to the residential water use of every person in the U.S. over three years and the total volume of water that flows out of the Mississippi River over 90 days, and is nearly four times the size of Lake Mead—the largest reservoir in the U.S.—which sits behind Hoover Dam.

—Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

National Geographic:

More than half of that drain would be from coal-fired power plants and 30 percent attributable to biofuel production, in IEA’s view. The agency estimates oil and natural gas production together would account for 10 percent of global energy-related water demand in 2035. (See related quiz: “What You Don’t Know About Biofuel.”)

Not everyone agrees with the IEA’s projections. The biofuel industry argues that the Paris-based agency is both overestimating current water use in the ethanol industry, and ignoring the improvements that it is making to reduce water use. But government agencies and academic researchers in recent years also have compiled data that point to increasingly water-intensive energy production. Such a trend is alarming, given the United Nations’ projection that by 2025, 1.8 billion people will be living in regions with severe water scarcity, and that two-thirds of the world’s population could be living under water-stressed conditions.

“Energy and water are tightly entwined,” says Sandra Postel, director of the Global Water Policy Project, and National Geographic’s Freshwater Fellow. “It takes a great deal of energy to supply water, and a great deal of water to supply energy. With water stress spreading and intensifying around the globe, it’s critical that policymakers not promote water-intensive energy options.”

Read more

More Below the Ad

Advertisement

Square, Site wide

New and Improved Comments

If you have trouble leaving a comment, review this help page. Still having problems? Let us know. If you find yourself moderated, take a moment to review our comment policy.

 
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 

A Progressive Journal of News and Opinion   Publisher, Zuade Kaufman   Editor, Robert Scheer
© 2014 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.