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Taibbi: ‘Outrageous HSBC Settlement Proves the Drug War Is a Joke’

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Posted on Jan 6, 2014
Michael Fleshman (CC BY-SA 2.0)

British bank HSBC received a settlement deal from Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer that amounts to a slap on the wrist for laundering billions of dollars for Colombian and Mexican drug cartels and violating a host of international banking laws. At Rolling Stone in mid-December, Matt Taibbi called the preferential treatment “the ultimate insult to every ordinary person who’s ever had his life altered by a narcotics charge.”

The $1.9 billion fine amounts to five weeks of the bank’s income. As The New York Times put it, the feds refuse to prosecute bank officials because the corporation is a systemically important institution:

Federal and state authorities have chosen not to indict HSBC, the London-based bank, on charges of vast and prolonged money laundering, for fear that criminal prosecution would topple the bank and, in the process, endanger the financial system.

At Rolling Stone, Taibbi responds:

It doesn’t take a genius to see that the reasoning here is beyond flawed. When you decide not to prosecute bankers for billion-dollar crimes connected to drug-dealing and terrorism (some of HSBC’s Saudi and Bangladeshi clients had terrorist ties, according to a Senate investigation), it doesn’t protect the banking system, it does exactly the opposite. It terrifies investors and depositors everywhere, leaving them with the clear impression that even the most “reputable” banks may in fact be captured institutions whose senior executives are in the employ of (this can’t be repeated often enough) murderers and terrorists. Even more shocking, the Justice Department’s response to learning about all of this was to do exactly the same thing that the HSBC executives did in the first place to get themselves in trouble—they took money to look the other way.

The appropriate penalty for a bank in HSBC’s position, Taibbi writes, is to take all of its money. Take “every last dollar the bank has made since it started its illegal activity. … Dive into every bank account of every single executive involved in this mess and take every last bonus dollar they’ve ever earned. …  Take their houses, their cars, the paintings they bought at Sotheby’s auctions, the clothes in their closets, the loose change in the jars on their kitchen counters, every last freaking thing. Take it all and don’t think twice. And then throw them in jail.”

If that sounds harsh, recall that that’s exactly what the government does almost every day to ordinary people involved in drug cases.

Taibbi continues:

The institutional bias in the crack sentencing guidelines was a racist outrage, but this HSBC settlement blows even that away. By eschewing criminal prosecutions of major drug launderers on the grounds (the patently absurd grounds, incidentally) that their prosecution might imperil the world financial system, the government has now formalized the double standard.

They’re now saying that if you’re not an important cog in the global financial system, you can’t get away with anything, not even simple possession. You will be jailed and whatever cash they find on you they’ll seize on the spot, and convert into new cruisers or toys for your local SWAT team, which will be deployed to kick in the doors of houses where more such inessential economic cogs as you live. If you don’t have a systemically important job, in other words, the government’s position is that your assets may be used to finance your own political disenfranchisement.

On the other hand, if you are an important person, and you work for a big international bank, you won’t be prosecuted even if you launder nine billion dollars. Even if you actively collude with the people at the very top of the international narcotics trade, your punishment will be far smaller than that of the person at the very bottom of the world drug pyramid. You will be treated with more deference and sympathy than a junkie passing out on a subway car in Manhattan (using two seats of a subway car is a common prosecutable offense in this city). An international drug trafficker is a criminal and usually a murderer; the drug addict walking the street is one of his victims. But thanks to Breuer, we’re now in the business, officially, of jailing the victims and enabling the criminals.

This is the disgrace to end all disgraces. It doesn’t even make any sense. There is no reason why the Justice Department couldn’t have snatched up everybody at HSBC involved with the trafficking, prosecuted them criminally, and worked with banking regulators to make sure that the bank survived the transition to new management. As it is, HSBC has had to replace virtually all of its senior management. The guilty parties were apparently not so important to the stability of the world economy that they all had to be left at their desks.

—Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

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