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Posted on Apr 6, 2010

What Noam Chomsky has to say about globalization, why older is wiser, and proof that at least two of the three bozos who most wrecked the economy still don’t get it.

On a regular basis, Truthdig brings you the news items and odds and ends that found their way to Larry Gross, director of the USC Annenberg School for Communication. A specialist in media and culture, art and communication, visual communication and media portrayals of minorities, Gross helped found the field of gay and lesbian studies.

The links below open in a new window. Newer ones are on top.


In social dealings, being older is being wiser
It turns out grandma was right: Listen to your elders. New research indicates they are indeed wise — in knowing how to deal with conflicts and accepting life’s uncertainties and change.

Noam Chomsky: Globalization Marches On
To date, growing popular outrage has not challenged corporate power. The future depends on how much the great majority is willing to endure, and whether that great majority will collectively offer a constructive response to confront the problems at the core of the state capitalist system of domination and control. If not, the results might be grim, as history more than amply reveals.

Jamie Dimon: The Most Dangerous Man In America
Jamie Dimon is by far the most dangerous American banker of this or any other recent generation. He, and his successors, will lead us into great harm.

Iraq Foreign Embassies Bombed, Scores Killed
The headlines out of Iraq Sunday are mainly owing to the consequences of the U.S. troop withdrawal from that country.

Robert Fisk: Glossy New Front in Battle for Hearts and Minds
It’s sleek, it’s glossy, it’s in eloquent Arabic, Pashto and Dari, and it pours derision on American and NATO forces in Afghanistan; it is the brand new propaganda wing of the Taliban: not just Internet video of attacks on the Western armies in Helmand and Kandahar, but professionally produced magazines.

Terrifying Video: ‘I Don’t Need a Warrant, Ma’am’

From free books to e-books: how publishers are dealing with digital
Publishers are re-thinking books for the digital era. Emma Barnett looks at the ways technology is changing the publishing industry.

Picking our brains: How many ways can we be conscious?
You might think consciousness is like a light switch, either on or off. But the true picture now seems rather murkier, challenging our notions of awareness and free will, as well as raising issues of consent in coma patients.

‘HOLD ME back!’ is a part of Israeli folklore. It reminds us of our childhood.
When a boy has a scuffle with a bigger and stronger boy, he pretends that he is going to attack him any moment and shouts to the spectators: “Hold me back, or I am going to kill him!”
Israel is now in such a situation. We pretend that we are going to attack Iran at any moment and shout to the entire world: “Hold us back or ... ”

Greenspan, Summers, and Why the Economy Is So Out of Whack
I’m in the “green room” at ABC News, waiting to join a roundtable panel discussion on ABC’s weekly Sunday news program, “This Week.”

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By Caro, April 7, 2010 at 6:21 am Link to this comment

Here’s another study:

Growing older = Becoming more original
http://www.manyyearsyoung.com/2010/04/growing-older-
becoming-more-original.html

(UPI) [A Swedish researcher] says older people are
usually thought of as a rather homogenous group—
ill, lonely and unable to take care of themselves.
However, differences among people actually grow with
age and stereotypes of the aged are not based on
reality…

[The] study found social mechanisms strengthened
one’s identity, helping maintain self-esteem through
successful responses to challenges and promoting
conversational support that may help promote longer
life.

“Taken together, these mechanisms also contribute to
increased everyday activity, which has some
beneficial physical effects,” [researcher Bo]
Eriksson said.

Carolyn Kay
http://www.ManyYearsYoung.com

Report this

By C.Curtis.Dillon, April 7, 2010 at 6:07 am Link to this comment

In defense of “older” people (being one)

Like all humans, what we do with our knowledge has a lot to do with how we see life.  Some take what they’ve learned and develop “wisdom” which is the ability to offer hard won understanding from years of experience.  Others take the same knowledge and become bitter or angry because they have seen so much hypocrisy and stupidity which makes them cynical.  Unfortunately, others become afraid because they know how vulnerable they are as age slows their physical and mental abilities.  The TEA party crazies may fall into this latter category.

The young have education and clever minds but lack any sense of history.  Older people have a vast store of knowledge and “wisdom’ but lack the quickness of the young.  The two sides should work together and then have both quickness and wisdom ... what an interesting concept?

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By Caro, April 6, 2010 at 2:44 pm Link to this comment

To Hulk2008:

>>Maybe living longer than others just means they
learned to be greedier and more self-serving than
their peers.

I think different people act differently as they age,
and I don’t think generalizing is as easy as the
authors of the study make it sound. Some people
become more fearful and selfish, and others become
more inclusive and giving.

But what really made me angry about the study was its
assumption that being conciliatory is a part of
wisdom. It’s impossible to be conciliatory with right
wingers except to give them 150% of what they want,
and never stand in their way. But if we did that, the
country would be in worse shape than it already is.

My own prayer is to gain the serenity to accept the
things I cannot change, the courage to change the
things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

Letting crazies run all over you is not wisdom.

Carolyn Kay
MakeThemAccountable.com

Carolyn Kay
MakeThemAccountable.com

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Hulk2008's avatar

By Hulk2008, April 6, 2010 at 12:05 pm Link to this comment

To Caro:

Unfortunately, a lot of our elders (like my own stepmother) ARE right-wing crazies. 

e.g. Stepmom’s convinced the Mexicans are taking her social security checks (and Medicare of course)..... even though the money is automatically deposited into her checking account. 

Maybe living longer than others just means they learned to be greedier and more self-serving than their peers.  Homo sapiens out-competed and killed off the neanderthals; but all the neanderthals - an otherwise peaceful bunch - wanted to do was eat mastodon steaks.

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By Caro, April 6, 2010 at 9:08 am Link to this comment

>>knowing how to deal with conflicts

Which of our elders knows how to deal with the right-
wing crazies?

Carolyn Kay
MakeThemAccountable.com

Report this

By Tim Kelly, April 6, 2010 at 3:54 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Why is there an ad for Henry McMaster saying “Obamacare is unconstitutional” and “you can join Henry and throw it out?”  Either Truthdig is not screening their ads or their true colors are starting to show.

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