Top Leaderboard, Site wide
Shop the Truthdig Gift Guide 2014
December 26, 2014
Truthdig: Drilling Beneath the Headlines
Sign up for Truthdig's Email NewsletterLike Truthdig on FacebookFollow Truthdig on TwitterSubscribe to Truthdig's RSS Feed

Get Truthdig's headlines in your inbox!


Christmas Joy Without Piety




Living on a Dollar a Day


Truthdig Bazaar
Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt

Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt

By Chris Hedges and Joe Sacco
$25.99

more items

 
Ear to the Ground

Pope Benedict XVI to Resign From Scandal-Plagued Church

Email this item Email    Print this item Print    Share this item... Share

Posted on Feb 11, 2013
AP/L'Osservatore Romano

Pope Benedict XVI abruptly announced Monday that he would resign the papacy at the end of February. The 85-year-old, who cited his declining health as the reason for stepping down, will become the first pope to resign since 1415.

In a written statement, the pope said that “both strength of mind and body are necessary strength” to perform his duties, but that his health “has deteriorated in me to the extent that I have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted to me.” (Read the full statement here).

The former Joseph Ratzinger, who was elected in 2005 after the death of Pope John Paul II, sought to “strengthen the Catholic Church’s core beliefs” as its leader. 

However, as The Guardian’s John Hooper noted, whatever messages Pope Benedict tried to convey during his tenure were “drowned out” by the child abuse scandal and other controversies that rocked the Vatican during his reign.

The Guardian:

The abuse scandals dominated his nearly eight years as leader of the world’s Catholics. Before his accession, there had been scandals in the US and Ireland. But in 2010, evidence of clerical sexual abuse was made public in a succession of countries in continental Europe, notably Austria, Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway and Germany.

The pope was personally affected by one of these scandals. It emerged that, while he was archbishop of Munich, a known molester was quietly reassigned, allowing him in time to return to pastoral duties and make contact with young people.

The flood of allegations represented a vast setback for the project at the heart of Benedict’s papacy. The goal he had set for himself, and for which he was elected, was to launch the re-evangelisation of Europe, Catholicism’s heartland: it was why he adopted as his papal name that of the continent’s patron saint, Benedict of Nursia. But if the numbers of the faithful in Europe as the pope leaves office are fewer than when he was elected, then – surveys repeatedly indicated – it is in large part because of anger and despair in the Catholic laity over the sex abuse scandals.

Read more

—Posted by Tracy Bloom.

More Below the Ad

Advertisement

Square, Site wide

New and Improved Comments

If you have trouble leaving a comment, review this help page. Still having problems? Let us know. If you find yourself moderated, take a moment to review our comment policy.

 
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 

A Progressive Journal of News and Opinion   Zuade Kaufman, Publisher   Robert Scheer, Editor-in-Chief
© 2014 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.

Like Truthdig on Facebook