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Ear to the Ground

Ortega Stirs Controversy in Re-Election Bid

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Posted on Nov 13, 2010
Daniel Ortega
Wikimedia Commons

Daniel Ortega is seeking to run for president again, despite a constitutional ban against consecutive terms or holding office more than twice.

Contemporary Nicaraguan politics have always been mired in conflict, be it in response to natural disasters, U.S.-sponsored terrorism, or depressing and dire poverty. And now President Daniel Ortega is using a “contested interpretation” of the country’s constitution to try to stay in power, incensing his opposition.

Ortega has irked many of his former allies, with one former rebel fighter planning to run against him and another taking up arms in the same mountains where civil war raged for years. —JCL

The New York Times:

President Daniel Ortega’s push to stay in power using a contested interpretation of the Constitution has reignited the furor of former contras who fought his Sandinista government in the 1980s, with one former rebel taking up arms in the mountains and another vowing to oust him at the polls.

But in the absence of a post-cold-war sponsor, Nicaragua’s opposition is struggling to coordinate an electoral offensive against Mr. Ortega, whose approval ratings rose to 45 percent last month with the help of his Venezuelan-financed response to flooding that killed scores of people and forced thousands to flee their homes.

Mr. Ortega’s critics contend that he is disregarding the Constitution and turning his role as the largest Central American beneficiary of Venezuela’s leftist president, Hugo Chávez, into political capital for next year’s vote, in November.

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By Aaron Ortiz, November 13, 2010 at 8:14 pm Link to this comment

After re-reading the Times article, I find that it was JCL, who posted the article
here who used the word “contested”. The Times is not at fault, but JCL.

Report this

By Aaron Ortiz, November 13, 2010 at 8:14 pm Link to this comment

After re-reading the Times article, I find that it was JCL, who posted the article
here who used the word “contested”. The Times is not at fault here, but JCL.

Report this

By Aaron Ortiz, November 13, 2010 at 8:10 pm Link to this comment

Is the Times article referring to a bogus constitution of Nicaragua published this
September, without the approval of congress, while they were in recess?

If so, I would like to point out to those who are willing to trust the content of the
New York Times site without question…to stop doing so, and to start thinking
critically.

“Contested” is much too soft a word here, and I doubt they can plead ignorance in
choosing it.

Report this
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