Top Leaderboard, Site wide
September 17, 2014
Truthdig: Drilling Beneath the Headlines
Help us grow by sharing
and liking Truthdig:
Sign up for Truthdig's Email NewsletterLike Truthdig on FacebookFollow Truthdig on TwitterSubscribe to Truthdig's RSS Feed

Newsletter

sign up to get updates


For the Love of Scotland




On the Run


Truthdig Bazaar
The Beginner’s Goodbye

The Beginner’s Goodbye

By Anne Tyler
$15.94

more items

 
Ear to the Ground

Obama Brings Chinese VP to the White House

Email this item Email    Print this item Print    Share this item... Share

Posted on Feb 14, 2012
bbc.co.uk

Portrait of diplomacy: President Obama meets with China’s VP Xi Jinping and several members of the press (not pictured) in the White House on Tuesday.

On Tuesday, Barack Obama played host to China’s Vice President Xi Jinping at the White House to discuss trade, human rights and other diplomatic topics. Why all the fuss over a VP? For one, Xi was returning a gesture that his American counterpart, Joe Biden, recently made. For another, he is expected to become China’s next president, replacing Hu Jintao next year.  —KA

BBC:

During a state department lunch later, Mr Xi said there had been “tremendous” achievements for China in human rights in the past 30 years, adding “of course there’s always room for improvement”.

He also hailed further economic co-operation with the US, saying that any issues should be resolved through dialogue, “not protectionism”.

The leaders were expected to discuss foreign policy issues, including Syria and Iran. But Washington also hopes to learn more about the Chinese heir apparent’s leadership style, say correspondents.

Mr Xi is making a week-long trip as the guest of US Vice-President Joe Biden, who made a high-profile visit to China late last year.

Earlier in the day, Mr Xi met Mr Biden and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at the White House’s Roosevelt Room.

Read more

More Below the Ad

Advertisement

Square, Site wide

New and Improved Comments

If you have trouble leaving a comment, review this help page. Still having problems? Let us know. If you find yourself moderated, take a moment to review our comment policy.

By heterochromatic, February 15, 2012 at 10:27 pm Link to this comment

not several, eleven, Max….......

the oil and gas IS the Spratly’s and yeah, the Chinese want it .

Report this
IMax's avatar

By IMax, February 15, 2012 at 9:53 pm Link to this comment

hetero, - “is this about more than the Spratly Islands dispute?”

-

Yes, much more.  It’s about potentially huge quantities of oil and gas which China is currently attempting to dominate.  - You mentioned the first new Chinese aircraft-carrier? 

Aircraft-carriers, of which the U.S. has several, is intended for one purpose.  To project forcible power.  Vietnam and the Philippines are each begging the U.S. for protection from China.

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 15, 2012 at 8:43 pm Link to this comment

Max—perhaps you could explain what you mean about


“Philippines and Vietnam feeling threatened by China over the last couple of
decades?”

is this about more than the Spratly Islands dispute?

Report this
IMax's avatar

By IMax, February 15, 2012 at 6:24 pm Link to this comment

hetero, - “China is not a major maritime power’

-

I wrote that China is a growing power, both militarily and financially.  This aircraft-carrier was assumed in the comment.

I now understand that you were referring to China as an emerging naval power.  But what has China’s aircraft-carrier got to do with the Philippines and Vietnam feeling threatened by China over the last couple of decades?

-

This is my point.  China would expand every influence it could if not for Russia and the United States.  I get little sense from these pages that more than a handful of people here fully grasp this reality. - Can anyone here point to an example of Chinese altruism in the last 50 years?

Gerard is not alone when she indicates that, while China is subtle and sophisticated, the United States makes instant, over-simple assumptions.  Frankly none of that makes any sense in the wider world.  That view is born of a near complete misunderstanding of the world in which we reside.  These are people who put every focus on one nation in a world.

China has a non-existent record on human-rights, anywhere.  China employs nearly no environmental standards.  China practices very few employee safety standards and there is no “fairness” of wages.  China builds heavily controlled “industrial cities” wherein tens of thousands of employees may not travel while production is online.  Tens of thousands are often called to work 14 hour days, six (sometimes seven) days a week.  Residents of these industrial cities may not purchase food and household goods outside of State-run stores.  Laborers live where they are told to live (unless a family can “bribe-up”).  Believe it or not, in terms of economy, all of the above are the positives about living in China.  The negatives are the millions, literally, who starve every day outside of the major metropolitan areas. - Nobody ever wishes to talk the starvation (but we go on incessantly over the latest Chris Hedges article). 

In the world in which we currently reside China is not known as a significant donor of aid to others around the world.  China wields considerable influences all over the globe.  It also wields extremely rigid control over her own regional neighbors in trade and economics. 

Sophisticated?  Perhaps.  But China does what is best for China.  Not fully grasping that takes the entire world out of context.

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 15, 2012 at 4:36 pm Link to this comment

IMax—-China is not a major maritime power and is just developing into one,
finishing its first aircraft carrier.

They’re coming but are still years away.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13693495

Report this
IMax's avatar

By IMax, February 15, 2012 at 2:58 pm Link to this comment

hetero,

We will disagree.  China is not, as you describe, an emerging power. 

China and it’s spheres of influence dates back centuries.  China is a rapidly growing power.  Both financially and militarily.  For the good and the bad China is, and will remain, a competitor to the United States.

China steadfastly does what’s good for China.

Report this
IMax's avatar

By IMax, February 15, 2012 at 2:47 pm Link to this comment

gerard, - The more subtle and sophisticated Mr. Xi.

-

Setting aside Mr. Xi’s subtle sophistication, are you aware that both the Philippines and Vietnam have repeatedly accused China of overt aggression in the region?  Also, are you aware that the United States is continuously attacked by China in numerous ways nearly every day that passes?

I make no claim that China is an evil empire or a dire enemy of the United States.  I ask these questions because, I believe, you are largely unaware of events which take place outside of the United States. 

I sincerely believe that you and others would hold a higher opinion of the United States if you knew and understood the wider world we live in.  The U.S. is not what’s wrong with the world.

Report this

By gerard, February 15, 2012 at 11:47 am Link to this comment

“Testing the waters?”  The more subtle and sophisticated meaning of Mr. Xi’s sremark might well have been that if China and the US can’t work out amicable agreements, the Pacific Ocean is big enough to sink both of them.  Read it again: 

“China and the US, Mr Xi said, had ‘converging interests’ in the region and there was ‘ample space’ for both in the Pacific Ocean.”

PS—The American government, like its population, is not known for being able to detect subtleties. We tend to make instant, over-simple assumptions and act on the spur of the moment, often violently.  It’s a weakness, not a strength, and may get us killed someday.

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 15, 2012 at 11:00 am Link to this comment

Yeah IMax testing the waters. Probing the other nations of th pacific to see what
the reactions are to assertions of Chinese power. Not at all unusual for emerging
powerhouse nations.

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 15, 2012 at 10:39 am Link to this comment

freeze—glad to be wrong and insulting you with YP talk but “overwhelm the
west via their immense population (even then) and their single-mindedness and
work ethic.”

sounded pretty close to that.

I’m happy to be wrong and happily apologize.


Now, whenever you worry about that “made in China” label, remember twp
things

!) the labels used to say made in Japan

and

2)the labels are starting to say made in China less often as the factories are
again migrating to some other, less developed nation

Report this
mrfreeze's avatar

By mrfreeze, February 15, 2012 at 7:23 am Link to this comment

heterochromatic - Please don’t label my observation with your shallow, racist bullshit in an attempt to get around facts: The next time you buy something, take a careful look at where it was made. Then subtract x number of American jobs from the equation….my comment was all about the economic realities of doing business with China…We’ve given up a lot and they haven’t. Our “capitalism” has been fueled and financed by their communism.

Report this
IMax's avatar

By IMax, February 15, 2012 at 5:24 am Link to this comment

hetero, - “China is just getting its feet wet and testing the waters.”

-

Testing the waters?

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 15, 2012 at 12:35 am Link to this comment

freeze, the Yellow Peril shit should get but back in the attic. if people only did
business with people that they trust, business would be quite different, wouldn’t
rely upon written contracts, and would be sparse….and war would be far more
prevalent than it is already.

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 15, 2012 at 12:32 am Link to this comment

Maxie, China is just getting its feet wet and testing the waters.

it’s quite true that the US and China have interests that are about to converge, but
also true that they don’t necessarily have to collide.

Report this
mrfreeze's avatar

By mrfreeze, February 14, 2012 at 8:40 pm Link to this comment

I can still remember Nixon going to China when I was a boy. The adults in my family talked about the fact that the Chinese would someday overwhelm the west via their immense population (even then) and their single-mindedness and work ethic. They saw it coming then….and now the reality is here.

I don’t know if some of you feel the way I do but here goes:

1) Dealing with the Chinese “government” is more like networking with a huge “chamber of commerce.” There’s no “cultural” exchange between our leaders. It’s all smiling and talking business and I’m sure behind the scenes our very future is being bargained away so that “American businesses can become even more wealthy than they already are. The business community here envies the Chinese because they get away with all the things corporations can’t get away with here (slave labor, no environmental standards, no regulation). 
2) I can’t resist thinking about all of our jobs being done in China today. It’s the place where the profits are being made by the slave labour of a people who have nothing better to do than make our junk for us.
3) I don’t really trust the Chinese and I’ve grown to unconditionally mistrust anything American business does with the Chinese.

We’ve been had.

Report this
IMax's avatar

By IMax, February 14, 2012 at 7:18 pm Link to this comment

gerard, “Truer words”.

-

Before you say anything more, are you aware that both the Philippines and Vietnam have repeatedly accused China of overt aggression in the region?

Report this

By gerard, February 14, 2012 at 5:18 pm Link to this comment

Truer words were never spoken: “China and the US, Mr Xi said, had ‘converging interests’ in the region and there was ‘ample space’ for both in the Pacific Ocean.”

Report this
 
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 

A Progressive Journal of News and Opinion   Publisher, Zuade Kaufman   Editor, Robert Scheer
© 2014 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.