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Ear to the Ground

Manning Defers Plea as Court-Martial Starts

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Posted on Feb 23, 2012
AP

On Thursday, accused WikiLeaker and military detainee Pfc. Bradley Manning showed up for a hearing in Fort Meade, Md., where he heard the 22 charges against him for allegedly making classified documents publicly available via the Internet and held off on entering a plea.  —KA

Reuters via Google News:

Manning’s plea deferral allows his defense team time to strategize and see the outcome of several motions to be heard before the trial begins, which could be as late as August.

“It basically leaves their options open,” said a legal expert with the Military District of Washington, the Army command unit for the capital region, who was present at the arraignment. The expert could not be named under rules imposed on media covering the proceedings.

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By heterochromatic, February 25, 2012 at 10:34 am Link to this comment

jimmmmmmmy—- thank you for the expression of sympathy and am glad to
move away from discussing 9/11…..


if by 9/11/73 you’re referring to our coup in Chile , I agree with you that the
worldwide mess of our cold war with the USSR was incomparable larger, more
significant to the world, and far more damaging overall than the 9/11 attacks.

many, many millions were slaughtered and many more millions suffered….and it
has had a profoundly distortive effect upon the USA,

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 25, 2012 at 10:23 am Link to this comment

vec——my position is NOT that he should spend the rest of his life in prison…

It’s very far from that.


you misread my comment about it…......


what I do say is that he’s a screwed-up person and that he is likely to get , and
should get, a couple of years in a place where they can treat him and then
release him.


I did say something in response to someone saying that Manning is a hero to
the effect that IF Manning had thought everything out and IF he had made a
conscious capable informed decision as a fully-functioning adult ...to release
hundreds of thousands of documents that were unrelated to anything in
Iraq….......THEN he deserved to spend his life in jail just as Pollard does.

Report this
vector56's avatar

By vector56, February 25, 2012 at 10:02 am Link to this comment

“vec, can’t help you. you simply don’t read well. I haven’t called for Manning’s head,”

Yes, you did; by stating that he should spend the rest of his life in prison. Technically, one could say life in prison is not calling for his head.


“I will say that I’ve met Ayers ( our son and his ward Chesa were bunkmates at
camp as kids) and neither myself nor he agree with your statement that he
“harmed no one”. “

I guess after being “bitch-slapped” by the media for so many years Ayers, like Fonda will tell you right wing thugs anything you want to hear for a little “peace” in their old age.

Stockholm syndrome is alive and well.

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By jimmmmmy, February 25, 2012 at 9:52 am Link to this comment

this story and comment area are about brad manning and the injustice being applied to him by the amerikan security industry, which now dwarfs all other internal businesses in the u.s. so we are getting way off subject. however , last response on this 9/11 stuff i’m not amerikan and have no interest per se in 9/11. [did you know that 9/11/73 was far worse than 9/11/01] to most of the rest of the world your 9/11 is small potatos. i’m sorry for your loss of a friend or relatve but thats not the issue we are dicussing. there are literally millions of people in this world who’s relatives or friends have died horribly in war.

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 25, 2012 at 9:24 am Link to this comment

vec, can’t help you. you simply don’t read well. I haven’t called for Manning’s head,
I surely never called for Ellsberg’s (at the time I heartily approved of his actions
and and cheered the NYTs case against the Nixon admin)

and I have not said anything about Ayers.


I will say that I’ve met Ayers ( our son and his ward Chesa were bunkmates at
camp as kids) and neither myself nor he agree with your statement that he
“harmed no one”.

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 25, 2012 at 9:12 am Link to this comment

jimmmmmmmmy===does “involved in investment banking” mean that they were
mostly people who answered telephones, put paper in the copy machines, and
brought sandwiches from home for lunch or were they people who rode around in
limos and week-ended on private islands in the Caribbean after spending the
week defrauding widows and orphans?

I’m not screaming, I just knew a couple of those people in those buildings who
died that day. the ones that I knew weren’t investment bankers.

Report this

By jimmmmmy, February 25, 2012 at 8:29 am Link to this comment

hetrochromatic it was called the world trade center and what amerika now calls trade is mostly “banking and financial services” that 400 security types died isn’t the issue. if you continue to investigate the companies who’s offices were in the trade center you’ll see that 1000+ of those were involved in “investment banking”. i realize this a inconvenient truth.  just scream a little harder as a lot of amerikans are wont to do when faced with   any opposition to his or her beliefs, it’ll make you feel better, however it won’t change things.

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PatrickHenry's avatar

By PatrickHenry, February 25, 2012 at 7:12 am Link to this comment

Well as I read this thread 8 posters advocate freedom for Manning and 1 doesn’t.

In the supreme court of national opinion Manning would walk.

http://fija.org/

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vector56's avatar

By vector56, February 25, 2012 at 6:10 am Link to this comment

heterochromatic:

I guess at this point we can agree to disagree.

everything you have presented so far flies in the face of “justice”. Secret evidence (after the fact) presented by a corrupt government to retroactively justify a murder they have already committed.

I have lived through the 60s, 70, and the 1980s and watch my government “setup” and murder many civil rights leaders. The FBI used ever dirty trick in the book to frame MLK; played a part in the killing of Malcolm X; and locked up and murdered a lot of good “Weather-men” and Black Panthers.

Guys like you always seem to nostalgically look back at figures like Daniel Ellsberg with retroactive approval, but something tells me that you would have called for his head (as you do now for Bradly Manning’s) in real time.

Conclusion:

Bradly Manning is a national hero and should not do a day in prison for exposing America’s crimes against humanity and “Domestic Enemies”!

al-Awlaki and his 16 year old son were “human beings” first, US citizens who were put to death without charges being brought or a trial.

Jane Fonda exposed “crimes against humanity (As did Manning).

Bill Ayres (who harmed no one) was and is a brave compassionate Liberal who has spent his life helping others.

If the left allows Bradly Manning to be “thrown to the wolves”, and not extract a political price out Obama’s hide, then we are truly just “spectators” in our own land and not citizens.

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Not One More!'s avatar

By Not One More!, February 25, 2012 at 12:11 am Link to this comment

The war, US foreign policies, and government actions aren’t a ‘mistake.’ They are intentional policy by the corporate elite and their henchmen (our ‘elected’ officials) to take from the poor and give to the rich (including their lives).

Manning will never get the credit of being one of the most patriotic people in our country.

Just like Obama, Bush, Clinton, Reagan, will never be charged with treason which they legally deserve.

There is no peace without justice, and there is no justice if it is based on lies.

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 24, 2012 at 10:33 pm Link to this comment

because the link to HuffPo doesn’t work——

Anwar Al Awlaki Role In Prepping Underwear Bomber Revealed By Feds
Mike Sacks


“The United States on Friday submitted a memorandum to a Michigan federal
judge revealing that terrorist leader Anwar al Awlaki had more direct
involvement that previously known in the so-called underwear bomber’s
preparations to blow up Northwest Flight 253 on Christmas Day 2009.

Awlaki, a Yemeni American member of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula
(AQAP) who is credited with inspiring the would-be Christmas Day bomber,
Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, and Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan to carry out terrorist
acts on American soil, was killed in a drone strike in northwest Yemen this past
September.

According to the memo, Awlaki personally vetted Abdulmutallab, helped him
film a “martyrdom video,” and directed the underwear bomber to carry out his
suicide mission on a U.S. airliner over U.S. soil.

The memo recounts Awlaki’s hands-on approval of Abdulmutallab for a
“martyrdom mission” and his facilitation of the underwear bomber’s “instruction
in weapons and indoctrination in jihad” at an AQAP camp.

Abdulmutallab filmed a video with Awlaki’s assistance. According to the memo,
“Awlaki arranged for a professional film crew to film the video. Awlaki assisted
defendant in writing his martyrdom statement, and it was filmed over a period
of two to three days. The full video was approximately five minutes in length.”

Perhaps most important, the memo states, “Awlaki instructed defendant not to
fly directly from Yemen to Europe, as that could attract suspicion. Prior to
defendant’s departure from Yemen, Awlaki’s last instructions to him were to
wait until the airplane was over the United States and then to take the plane
down.”

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 24, 2012 at 10:30 pm Link to this comment

vec, I’ve also yet to point to one crime that Stonewall Jackson was charged with
prior to his being shot and killed by agents of the US government.

make the connection.

Report this
vector56's avatar

By vector56, February 24, 2012 at 10:11 pm Link to this comment

heterochromatic;

Other than the fact that your link leads to a dead end, you have said “nothing” so far that would justify the out right murder of a US citizen or any other human being for “speaking” words you may disagree with.

We “were” a country of Laws and not small men like yourself and Obama who assumes your personal disdain for some one trumps the constitution and the bill of rights.

People you might consider a “piece of shit” like child molesters and murders shall we put them to death without a trial as well, or is it just “open season on Muslim men?

Bottom line; you have yet to point to “one” crime al-Awlaki has been charged with! is the the new normal, kill a man first and look for the reasons afterwards? I have heard this song before; “Kill them all and let God sort them out!”

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 24, 2012 at 9:43 pm Link to this comment

vec, don’t try the stupid comparison….al-Awlaki
made himself a shit through his actions it’s that
basis upon which I judge him, not his race or
culture.

I gave you a paraphrase of a public statement from
him about how it’s good to kill Americans. read it
and respond to that which I say not to some crap that
I’ve not said or implied…..

 

 

here’s a little bit else to consider

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/10/anwar-al-
awlaki-underwear-bomber-federal-court-
memo_n_1269703.html


al-Awlaki did his best to take people’s lives and it
was only the inadequacy of himself and his associates
that spared those lives.

he died and there was nothing unjust about killing
him.

Report this
vector56's avatar

By vector56, February 24, 2012 at 9:25 pm Link to this comment

“He was a piece of shit that said that anybody was
justified to kill any American at any time and
without stopping to ask if it was a good idea.”

heterochromatic: your words above and below.

“As the piece of shit was himself an American, he got exactly what he called for as fair and just.”

You know Blacks in the South 50 years ago were considered “a piece of shit” by most Whites who dwelt there. Their humanity taken away by people like you reducing a human being to human waste.

Odds are Jews while they were being marched into gas chambers by their German masters were considered human shit by the monsters that took so many of their lives. 

Like Russ Feingold, you reduce the life of al-Awlaki to nothing, yet you conveniently avoid commenting on the killing of his 16 year old son.

Guys like you will always be around: in the background yelling the right words into the crowd at the right moment; “Hang the Negro!”, “Kill the Jew!”, “the only good Indian is a dead one!”

Al-Awlaki took no one’s life; he was charged with no crime; he was protected by our constitution, yet to one such as you he is a piece of shit?”

We now put people to death for “speech” we find offensive. Warm up the gas chambers:

Naturally we will start with the young Muslin men.

Next we will get to the Gays, revisit the Jews; and round things off with the Blacks.

When they finally get around to guys like yourself, don’t bother to look around, we will all be gone!

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 24, 2012 at 8:23 pm Link to this comment

jimmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmy-

Number of firefighters and paramedics killed: 343
Number of NYPD officers: 23
Number of Port Authority police officers: 37

do you have a list of people killed in the attacks that
shows that more than 400 of them were investment
bankers…and not just people working as clerks ?

Report this

By jimmmmmy, February 24, 2012 at 7:56 pm Link to this comment

an overlooked factoid in the shaping of the 9/11 myth. most of those killed were investment bankers. now called banksters. propoganda always has to confront little ironies like this, thats probably why its so shrill

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 24, 2012 at 7:47 pm Link to this comment

vec, had you troubled yourself to actually read and
think through my comments you would probably have
been able to figure out that I did not and do not
equate Fonda’s actions with those of Manning or al-
Awlaki’s.

I don’t call for the deaths of any of those people on
the list, but I shit sure don’t feel a second’s worth
of regret that al-Awlaki got greased;

He was a piece of shit that said that anybody was
justified to kill any American at any time and
without stopping to ask if it was a good idea.

As the piece of shit was himself an American, he got
exactly what he called for as fair and just.

nothing else on your idiotic summary reflects
anything that I’ve said.

do not again attempt to speak for me, vec, since you
don’t bother to understand what I actually say.

Report this
vector56's avatar

By vector56, February 24, 2012 at 6:45 pm Link to this comment

“Manning has accomplished far, far less than did
Ellsburg, Jiminy. “

heterochromatic;

I am sure if you were around you or your ilk would have called for Ellsburg’s head on a platter just as you now feel Manning must give what is left of his young life to these global thugs.

“However, I can say that if Jane Fonda were a member
of al Qaeda and was recruiting people to blow up
American civilians on commercial airplanes over
American soil after the US Congress had explicitly
authorized the executive branch to use military force against such folks, then it would be jake.”

Odds are if you had your way Jane Fonda would have been put to death for taking a camera crew
to Hanoi and showing America what happens when you “carpet bomb” cities.

I find it typical, but yet disgusting how your “fake outrage” for the human lives lost on 9/11 does not extend to the 3 million Vietnamese men women and children, or the million plus Iraqis!

Lastly, al-Awlaki and his 16 year old son were not part of al Qaeda. Neither was ever charged with a crime, and to this day the government you trust so much when it comes to “killing little Brown People” ; our hobby (Carlin) has yet to name anything specific he has done?

Like most who are void of reason, you evoke 9/11 to cash in to the cheap emotional rush it supplies to the “low information”, comrades among us.

Recap:

Kill Fonda
Kill al-Awlaki
Kill his 16 year old son
Lockup Manning for life

Does that about sum it up?

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 24, 2012 at 6:35 pm Link to this comment

jimmmy in 67-68 I was too young to be drafted and
thought that Fonda was right….

but she never took an oath to serve in the army and
then spilled all sorts of stuff that she never read.

had Manning leaked the one tape of the Iraq shooting,
rather than dumped all kinds of stuff ABOUT all kinds
of stuff in Afghanistan and around the world that a
dopy kid his age had no framework to judge and didn’t
bother to try to sort through, it would be a whole
different deal.

Report this

By jimmmmmy, February 24, 2012 at 6:22 pm Link to this comment

hetrochromatic your right so far but things have a way of turning around.

Report this

By jimmmmmy, February 24, 2012 at 6:20 pm Link to this comment

hetrochromatic i was in vietnam 67-68 and at that time thought jane fonda was a disloyal bimbo. by the 70s i considered her a real american patriot she has always been on the side of the angels even though she took a lot of stick for her views.i’m really pleased that her life has gone so well.

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 24, 2012 at 6:18 pm Link to this comment

Manning has accomplished far, far less than did
Ellsburg, Jiminy.

Report this

By jimmmmmy, February 24, 2012 at 6:11 pm Link to this comment

brad mannings mistake was not resigning from the service before publishing,like mr. ellsberg did. of course mr ellsberg had powerful friends brad manning has few. the pentagon papers overall had little effect on amerikan foreign policy other than making it more covert. brad mannings revelations has made it more murderous and overt. evidently most amerikan christians dems. and repubs. think killing and torturing muslims is okay as long as its for profit or oil.its in the bible.[ joking sort of] i feel sorry for brad manning his life at least in the short term is going to be very hard.

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By heterochromatic, February 24, 2012 at 5:30 pm Link to this comment

Revere Paul if I felt as strongly as you seem to feel
that Bradley manning acted with full competence and
took a deliberate and thought-out stance and then did
what he thought was the right thing to do, then I would
be happy to see him serve shoulder-to-shoulder with
Jonathan Pollard… together in jail for the entirety
of their lives.

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 24, 2012 at 5:16 pm Link to this comment

vec, I can’t tell you where the posts on Truthdig
come from and where they go. 

However, I can say that if Jane Fonda were a member
of al Qaeda and was recruiting people to blow up
American civilians on commercial airplanes over
American soil after the US Congress had explicitly
authorized the executive branch to use military force
against such folks, then it would be jake.

now, maybe you might ask the management about whether
everything simply disappeared or not.

Report this

By Maani, February 24, 2012 at 4:48 pm Link to this comment

Revere Paul:

Your post should be “must” reading not only here, but on every alternative (and MSM!) site that you can find to post it!

Bravo!

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vector56's avatar

By vector56, February 24, 2012 at 4:04 pm Link to this comment

heterochromatic:

Question: what happen to Amy Goodman’s Russ Feingold post/story?

I made a comment comparing what Jane Fonda did in Vietnam to what al-Awlaki did in Yemen and asked if Obama would “snuff” Fonda?

Not only did I not get a response, the whole post is missing???

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 24, 2012 at 9:58 am Link to this comment

it’s possible to think of him as a hero, if you
really, really, really don’t look at thinks
carefully, vec, but the job of his advocates is to
look after Manning, not to try to change the world.

the kid is pretty certain to be found guilty is the
charges…..unless he’s not really responsible for
his actions.

there is no way that he was justified in releasing
everything that he released, especially as he
couldn’t have even known the content of all of it.

Report this

By Jim Yell, February 24, 2012 at 8:47 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

We are not even trying to prosecute the people who crashed our economy, the people who forced us into invading Iraq using lies, and manipulation and that action alone has left 100,000 of dead and yet they sit in their oversized houses counting the money they made from their lies and no pay back demanded.

We are supposed to be a free country. We are supposed to be an informed country and yet our government feels free to lie to us all the time, to hide their crimes behind “Top Secret”, to hide their failures from public view.

The only traitors in this picture are political Generals, the President and Congress and the politcal parties who sell their influence to the highest bidder and yet they do not spend any time in jail, stripped of their clothes and stripped of their dignity.

I don’t care what Bradley’s motives were, or were not the information should not have been held in secret in the first place. He did not commit a crime, but our military has.

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By vector56, February 24, 2012 at 7:10 am Link to this comment

heterochromatic:


Reluctantly, I must agree with you. Manning is in my opinion a National Hero; his defenders are making a mistake positioning him to plead for “mercy” in a den of “stone cold killers” (the military).

On the other hand, it is not my ass on the line here; maybe the goal should be to make sure this young man does not spend the rest of his life in prison by “any means necessary!”

Report this

By heterochromatic, February 23, 2012 at 7:25 pm Link to this comment

great idea…...the defense is keeping to the line that Manning was too obviously
mentally unbalanced to have been permitted access to secrets and that the
military was negligent to have not kept him from any real responsibility.

Report this

By Revere Paul, February 23, 2012 at 7:18 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Dear Mr. Manning,

I thank you for your being one of the few to actually stand for the values of our Constitution and Founding Fathers, regardless of cost and sacrifice.

Your defense?  No matter what, they’re gonna screw you.  Might as well go for broke.

Simply state that you felt it your duty as a US citizen to inform the world of the war crimes and crimes against humanity being committed by the US.

Tell them that you took a sacred Oath to the Constitution and that you lived up to your Oath whereas obviously your hierarchy (all the way to the commander in chief) seems to have forgotten about theirs.

To their face, call them traitors that they are and ask for political prisoner status.

Watch the blogs and world catch on fire.  It won’t help you much at all, actually, it’ll piss them off and they’ll take it out on you even more.  But it will help the cause of America’s true values which have today been discarded by these fifth column neocons all so intent on pursuing and defending the interests of other nations before those of these United States.

PS: Did you get that postcard I sent you from some tropical island?  I know it ain’t much at all in compensation to your worthy sacrifice, but I hope it raised spirits a bit.

Many of us don’t have the guts you do but we thank you again dear fellow citizen.

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By gerard, February 23, 2012 at 7:14 pm Link to this comment

If the government did not take itself so seriously and were not as rigid as a stick, it would see the opportunity offered by the Leaks to simply correct its mistakes and move on.  Getting hung up over the truth being released to the public is a sure sign of self-doubt.

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By vector56, February 23, 2012 at 6:05 pm Link to this comment

ABC’s Jake Tapper confronted Jay Carney over the double standard of the Obama White House concerning the 2 journalist killed in Syria and their treatment of “Whistle Blowers” in this country: 

http://merih-news.com/jay-carney-grilled-for-us-double-standards/

Remember that Bradly Manning is “alleged” to have exposed this video of a US Attack Helicopter (Crazy Horse 18) murdering 12 people in cold blood; including 2 Reporters.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rXPrfnU3G0

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By berniem, February 23, 2012 at 5:05 pm Link to this comment

With all due attribution to the Faces I cite their ‘70s album entitled “A Nod Is As Good As A Wink To A Blind Horse” as emphasis when I ask how does one plead to a kangaroo?

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By PatrickHenry, February 23, 2012 at 4:26 pm Link to this comment

From what I’ve seen of the Wilileaks trove, Manning is guilty of embarassing the administration and the fools who run it than actually disclosing classified information which would cause serious or grave damage to the security of the United States.

At the end of the arraignment one Manning supporter, a protester with the anti-war group Code Pink, stood up and yelled out, “Judge, isn’t a soldier required to report a war crime?”

He sure did and I salute him for it.

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