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Ear to the Ground

LulzSec ‘Ringleader’ Arrested in Hacker Bust

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Posted on Mar 6, 2012
http://twitter.com/#!/lulzsecLulz Security

It’s been a tough couple of weeks in hactivist circles, as law enforcement officials announced Tuesday that six hackers affiliated with the Anonymous spinoff group LulzSec—including “ringleader” Hector Xavier Monsegur—have been busted. Monsegur apparently switched teams to help the FBI after he was apprehended last summer, according to The Associated Press.

AP via Google News:

Monsegur was portrayed in court papers as the ringleader, a legendary figure known in the hacking underworld as “Sabu.” Authorities said he formed an elite hacking organization last May and named it “Lulz Security” or “LulzSec.” ‘‘Lulz” is Internet slang that can be interpreted as “laughs,” ‘‘humor” or “amusement.”

Despite the organization’s lighthearted name, authorities said Monsegur and his followers embarked on a dastardly stream of deeds against business and government entities in the U.S. and around the world, resulting in the theft of confidential information, the defacing of websites and attacks that temporarily put victims out of business.

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By heterochromatic, March 9, 2012 at 7:22 am Link to this comment

PH——What’s “classified reporting”? and do you know any journalists?

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PatrickHenry's avatar

By PatrickHenry, March 9, 2012 at 4:19 am Link to this comment

tic,

Superficial to you perhaps as that describes 90% your nonsense posting but others as myself like to see some of the background on issues which create national policy and yes I’m a big boy and can handle the facts, which all too often are not present in classified reporting, just some yokels opinion of percieved fact and fantasy to meet an agenda.

I understand why you ostricise Manning, you think the volumes of bullshit he disclosed actually meant something. 

To me the disclosures meant that we still have patriots in this country willing to risk it all.

Report this

By heterochromatic, March 8, 2012 at 8:32 pm Link to this comment

vec——every government has legit reasons for keeping secrets.

plenty of things held as secrets aren’t legit but “no secrets” aint a good option in
this world…. and there’s a price to pay if you promise to keep secrets and don’t
keep your word.

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vector56's avatar

By vector56, March 8, 2012 at 8:12 pm Link to this comment

“a guy like me roots that
Manning gets away with leaking the video clip, but gets jugged for passing out
hundreds of thousands of documents that he never read.”

heterochromatic;

If one thinks that their government should keep secrets from it’s citizens your above statement makes sense; I do not!

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blogdog's avatar

By blogdog, March 8, 2012 at 3:03 pm Link to this comment

lots of hot air here - as intended - according to John Youg of Cryptom.org, within
the cypersecurity world, the fact that PFC Manning could actually do what it’s
claimed he did is literally a joke - a CS sting to promote Cybercom… again, from
John Young:

‘Spy services feed info to whistleblowers to keep tabs on site visitors’

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMRUiB_8tTc

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By heterochromatic, March 8, 2012 at 12:53 pm Link to this comment

vec——Manning at present doesn’t have a choice as to where he can shit, but he
still has a choice as to whether he testifies and as to the contents of his testimony.


you don’t have much of an idea about what I am, vec, but a guy like me roots that
Manning gets away with leaking the video clip, but gets jugged for passing out
hundreds of thousands of documents that he never read.

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By heterochromatic, March 8, 2012 at 10:13 am Link to this comment

PH—- only a superficial parallel to investigative journalists.

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vector56's avatar

By vector56, March 8, 2012 at 10:11 am Link to this comment

“whether the US govt jails Assange might be decided by
Manning. “

heterochromatic; you truly are piece of work.

Manning at this point can not decide where to take a shit! Yet you shift responsibility away from the thugs who will go after Assange and onto the prisoner Manning.

The Government will go after WikiLeaks, and Anonymous for starters. Later, they will take down PETA, GreenPeace, and Labor Unions. Guys like you will always be there to feed the fascist beast that will eventually devour us all.

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PatrickHenry's avatar

By PatrickHenry, March 8, 2012 at 4:40 am Link to this comment

Hackers are the new investigative journalists of the 21st century.

This duty once resided with the news media when it was wholly independent and not owned by umbrella corporate groups whose news manipulation and reporting is being used to promote its products and its advertisers products.

When the media gave up the ‘equal time’ accorded to rebuttal of news editorials and opposing viewpoints I knew then we were doomed to ever increasing propaganda and censorship.

And its only getting worse.

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blogdog's avatar

By blogdog, March 7, 2012 at 10:36 pm Link to this comment

Wikileaks Cointelpro Wizard of Oz or ‘Whistleblower’?

Deborah Dupre
Human Rights Examiner - NEWS | AUGUST 7, 2010
http://tinyurl.com/7lk83da

Intelligence on Wikileaks released this morning adds to mounting questions
about legitimacy of the founder being a whistleblower and the group’s agenda.
Sources of Intel Hub’s Alex Thomas concur with Wayne Madsen’s analysis that
the group is a CIA front, not surprising conidering the leader’s Australian
citizenship and its giant CIA secret base.

The Examiner National News Human Rights reporter stated in the article,
WikiLeaks CIA op one of many Down Under:

Wikileaks’ Australian head, Julian Assange caused a global stir with its claims of
classified video coverage of US war crimes and being tailed by operatives to the
point of supposedly fearing for their lives. The Aussie, however, is possibly a
black op wizard, one of many in the Land of Oz (Australia) that Christian groups
and others Down Under oppose.

Wayen Madsen (WMR) reports that his intelligence sources in China and
Thailand claim that people believe Wikileaks is linked to U.S. CIA cyber-warfare
and computer espionage operations plus Mossad’s cyber-warfare activities:

“In January 2007, John Young, who runs cryptome.org, a site that publishes a
wealth of sensitive and classified information, left Wikileaks, claiming the
operation was a CIA front. Young also published some 150 email messages
sent by Wikileaks activists on cryptome. They include a disparaging comment
about this editor by Wikileaks co-founder Dr. Julian Assange of Australia.
Assange lists as one of his professions ‘hacker.’ His German co-founder of
Wikileaks uses a pseudonym, ‘Daniel Schmitt.’”

[...]


News | © 2006-2012 Clarity Digital Group LLC d/b/a Examiner.com.

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By heterochromatic, March 7, 2012 at 10:06 pm Link to this comment

gerard——- I’m pretty sure that the govt HAS jailed
Manning and not for anything as frivolous and simply
juvenile as credit card numbers.

whether the US govt jails Assange might be decided by
Manning.

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By gerard, March 7, 2012 at 9:40 pm Link to this comment

hetero:  You mean the government is trying to jail Assange and Manning because of credit-card and email releases?

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By heterochromatic, March 7, 2012 at 9:13 pm Link to this comment

gerard———secrecy laws need to be challenged and
govt classification of documents should be made an
issue.

might be good to force it upon Obama as he long ago
made some promises that he has yet to keep of even
much discuss


——-


“President Barack Obama has apparently issued a long-
awaited executive order on classification that
fulfills one of his campaign promises by setting up a
National Declassification Center to oversee the
release of historical documents. But the
announcement, ironically, is shrouded in secrecy and
confusion.

“While the Government must be able to prevent the
public disclosure of information that would
compromise the national security, a democratic
government accountable to the people must be as
transparent as possible and must not withhold
information for self-serving reasons or simply to
avoid embarrassment,” National Security Council
official William Leary wrote in a blog post
announcing the order.

Oddly, that blog post was dated and time stamped at
4:44 p.m. Monday but does not appear to have shown up
on the White House website until a little before noon
Tuesday. Adding to the mystery, the link to the
executive order was dead at that time. Then, shortly
after this reporter inquired about that dead link,
the entire blog post disappeared.

The order reportedly sets deadlines for
declassification of information exempted from
automatic 25-year declassification requirements and
eliminates a veto the intelligence community held
over declassification orders from an interagency
panel that hears appeals of such cases.”


http://www.politico.com/blogs/joshgerstein/1209/Myste
ry_surrounds_new_Obama_order_on_classification.html

————-

having some hackers steal 860,000 e-mail addresses
and 75,000 unencrypted credit card numbers and
release them on the Web, a la Anonymous seems quite
unlike an “attempt to prevent war”.

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blogdog's avatar

By blogdog, March 7, 2012 at 7:17 pm Link to this comment

...what goes with it?

Nothing - read John Cage’s LECTURE ON NOTHING: “I am here. There is
nothing to say, and I am saying it.”
And so he does for the next hour -
however, common belief is that there is ‘something’ to protect and a lot of it - in
truth there’s ‘nothing’ - there’s a lot of billing and collection executed from
making virtually everyone believe otherwise

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By gerard, March 7, 2012 at 7:09 pm Link to this comment

blogdog:  Obviously, but what goes with it?

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By gerard, March 7, 2012 at 7:07 pm Link to this comment

Come to think of it, wars have remained “above the law” for centuries, has killed and wounded billions of men, women and children, and even now to try to stop a war, or not participate in one, can get you imprisoned. Hacking has been around less than one century and when it is used by hackers to try to prevent wars, or discourage participation,the hackers face imprisonment!  Figures!

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blogdog's avatar

By blogdog, March 7, 2012 at 6:48 pm Link to this comment

Is such a thing as an impermeable cyber-wall possible?

yes, pull the plug

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By gerard, March 7, 2012 at 6:17 pm Link to this comment

If secrets cannot be kept (as appears likely due to the internet technology), will agencies and persons who depend on keeping secrets gradually disappear?  What are some leading implications of a world where secrecy becomes out-dated? Is such a thing as an impermeable cyber-wall possible?

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By blogdog, March 7, 2012 at 4:26 pm Link to this comment

‘Spy services feed info to whistleblowers to keep tabs on site visitors’

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMRUiB_8tTc

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By gerard, March 7, 2012 at 4:21 pm Link to this comment

hetero raises just one of about a jillion dilemmas that will be “solved” by somebody or other sooner or later, and it would benefit all of us if we gave it some serious consideration: 
  Referring to hackers, Hetero presents this (only one)specific dilemma as an example:  “Why should those twits do it and if they may, why shouldn’t Sheriff Joe and his volunteer posse set out to hack
immigration advocate’s computer files to expose concealment of guilty knowledge of “illegal
Immigrants”. (What’s “guilty knowledge”?
But let’s ignore that for the moment.)
  The internet has raised jillions of similar questions which have to be answered with wise and just decisions appropriate to democratic self-government. Needless to say, a weak democracy is not in a strong position to answer such questions fairly because certain undemocratic forces will rule de facto and “the people” will be by-passed, as they are now. Worse yet, we can’t trust the Supreme Court to decide such important questions because the present members (in the “corporations are people” decision) have proven themselves undemocratic.  Are we beat before start?
  Not if a majority of people understand well enough what is going on with government surveillance agencies and/or hacker surveillance agencies, discuss together, decide together, and stand up for standards of reasonable fairness and equal justice.
  As in the case of continuous war as a “way of life”, human beings are faced with extinction if they can’t devise ways to live together with openness enough in communication and learning, and with self-regulation enough to prevent exploitation of the many for the benefit of the few.
  I’m sorry there’s no alternative short of public discussion, hetero.  I didn’t create these challenges, so don’t talk down to me about generalities. Narrow the field if you will, or propose ways to approach decision-making, or say something constructive.  We all need help here, and carping doesn’t get it so far as I am concerned.
If we avoid discussion of such “generalities”, we will end up the victims of other people’s decisions.
  PS: We don’t have all the time in the world to play catch up, either.

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By heterochromatic, March 7, 2012 at 4:12 pm Link to this comment

gerard—I think it rather important to your argument
that you explain about about is “secrecy” and what is
“privacy” and why one group of people should decide
that another group of people don’t have the right to
privacy.

I asked a rather outlandish question in my first
comment on this thread about Manning’s lawyer’s e-
mails.

I don’t see how it would continue to be outlandish if
hackers were to be above the law.

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By gerard, March 7, 2012 at 3:45 pm Link to this comment

hetero, when everything is “up for grabs” it is impossible to do anything but generalize.  The general concepts I mentioned relating to openness versus secrecy are very important at this stage in the game; whether you attack them or not is largely irrelvant.

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By Robert, March 7, 2012 at 7:13 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

So it appears that the most publicly successful hacking group working for ‘Anonymous’ was the FBI.
Note, they were actually committing crimes the whole time, crimes so serious that the one person they caught, the leader, organiser, recruiter and initiator of the crimes was threatened with more than one hundred years imprisonment but at the same time the FBI considered these crimes so petty and meaningless as to not only continue to allow them to occur but via their control of the leader of the group actually initiate the attacks (note the FBI control was so complete they were able to stop an attack against the CIA whilst allowing other crimes to continue).
It’s hardly uprising the buffoons from the FBI wish to remain ‘Anonymous’, exactly how many crimes did the FBI commit in order to capture 5 people who will all now claim entrapment as they neither lead no instigated any of the crimes but were just dupes caught up in an FBI scheme gone out of control.
Next the FBI will supply guns to criminals to commit crimes, whoops, they’ve already managed that and people died as a result.

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By heterochromatic, March 6, 2012 at 10:06 pm Link to this comment

gerard….there are a good number of generally good generalities in your
comment amongst all the obvious nonsense.

what is “secrecy” and what is “privacy” and which bunch of self-appointed twits
gets to sit in judgment of everyone else?

they’re not exposing misdemeanors and they’re not qualified to determine what
constitutes misdemeanors. the same shit that we have conniptions about when
done by the government and done without probable cause is what is being
defended.

why should those twits do it and if they may, why shouldn’t Sheriff Joe and his
volunteer posse set out to hack immigration advocacte’s computer files to
expose concealment of guilty knowledge of “illegal Immigrants”.

why isn’t James O;Keefe up for awards for his work in exposing people working
for ACORN who might have concealed deliberate evasion of governmental rules?

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By gerard, March 6, 2012 at 9:54 pm Link to this comment

Secrecy encourages dishonesty.  When dishonesty becomes policy, laws are useless and criminality thrives.
  Evidence everywhere proves that both public and private lying has become endemic. Lying causes distrust, which disintegrates societies. The only way to return to honesty is to stop the lying. The only way to stop the lying is to expose it and the harm it does so that the majority will choose not to lie, and those who lie are punished or at least not rewarded.
  In a democracy this will require a public choice and a widespread determination to adopt openness and honesty, which change will require huge changes in present laws and their determination, and in ways of “doing business” as well as ways of relating to each other. We are facing nothing less than the
opportunity to create a political and economic renaissance IMO.
  The release of documents that expose public and private business misdemeanors offers the public a chance to see the moral damage done to them and to others by dishonesty.
  The exposure of injustice and dishonesty will be painful to both those who are exposed and those who do the exposing.  To punish those who do the exposing instead of punishing those who are being dishonest is obviously unjust. 
  Courts of law must have the moral integrity to expose equal justice as much as can be mustered in every judgment bhey make, large or small.
  That courts of law have become instead places where partial truths are used to convict the partially or entirely innocent, and people’s testimony can be bought and sold, is a moral travesty ushering in political chaos.
  The Internet offers new possibilities demanding changes in older views of secrecy, openness particularly of public information, and the relation of these to democratic rule. We are beginning to experience growing pains in realizing that changes in moral standards are demanded by this new and powerful technology. To legally permit the internet to be used exclusively for secrecy would be disastrous. To give governments the power to use internet technology for collecting personal information for the purpose of using that information to curtail civil rights has caused a growing unresolved concern for legal limits being placed on survaillance, suspicion and subsequent persecution.
  We are facing a great opportunity to address new concerns honestly and fairly, with “malice toward none” and “justice for all.” 
  Democratic rule is a newborn.  As good parents we will not let it die in the cradle.

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By heterochromatic, March 6, 2012 at 7:56 pm Link to this comment

after you, kr.

I suggest strongly that you should worry about
whether there should be a single standard of law and
equal protection of it, and you should consider
whether a lawless approach to countering people who
may or may not be criminals is a decent or wise way
to go about things.

————

Roper: “So now you’d give the devil the benefit of
law?”
More: “Yes. What would you do? Cut a great road
through the law to get after the devil?”
Roper: “I’d cut down every law in England to do
that.”
More: “Oh, and when the last law was down, and the
devil turned on you, where would you hide, Roper, all
the laws being flat? This country is planted thick
with laws from coast to coast, man’s laws not God’s,
and if you cut them down—and you’re just the man
to do it—do you really think that you could stand
upright in the winds that would blow then?

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By kerryrose, March 6, 2012 at 6:26 pm Link to this comment

heterochromatic

Ya ya that whole scenerio sounds right hetero.  You sure got me buddy.

F off.

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By heterochromatic, March 6, 2012 at 5:00 pm Link to this comment

kerryrose, 
Too bad. I loved when they screwed the bad-guys… and
I don’t care about employee privacy– if you work for
criminals you don’t deserve it.——-


————-


would it also strike you as fun if they hacked the e-
mails of Bradley Manning’s lawyer and published the
lawyer saying that Manning told him that he sent the
stolen documents to Julian Assange after Asssange
talked him into stealing them and that Assange
promised Manning that he wouldn’t get caught, it was
the right thing to do, and that Assange and Manning
would split the money from the book rights to the
story of the theft?

after all, Manning’s lawyer is working for a criminal
and doesn’t deserve any privacy.
aint that right kerry?

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By blogdog, March 6, 2012 at 4:06 pm Link to this comment

Bust Reveals Government Runs Hacking Groups
                 
Kurt Nimmo
Infowars.com
March 6, 2012

http://www.infowars.com/bust-reveals-government-runs-hacking-groups/

The establishment media has characterized the leader of LulzSec ratting out his
hacktivist comrades as betrayal, but the incident reveals something far more
sinister – government is responsible for creating and unleashing computer
hacker groups.

Hector Xavier Monsegur, said to be the leader of LulzSec, worked for the FBI, according to news reports. He was reportedly arrested in Puerto Rico last June, pleaded guilty to hacking charges, and then began working with the FBI – or so the cover story would have it.

Monsequr, aka Sabu, decided what targets to attack and who would participate in the attacks, more than likely at the direction of this FBI handlers. It is believed he participated in the Anonymous effort to hack HBGary, the security firm that works closely with the CIA, NSA, FBI, and the Pentagon.

Sabu’s Lulz Security, commonly abbreviated as LulzSec, claimed responsibility for taking the CIA website offline. It also attacked Fox News, PBS, Sony, and a number of gamer sites. LulzSec claims to have hacked local InfraGard chapter sites, the organization affiliated with the FBI, and released the emails and passwords of a number of users of senate.gov.

LulzSec and Anonymous attacks have provided the government with an excuse to push their cyber security agenda and propaganda campaign, including the proposal for a “kill switch” that would have allowed Obama to shut down the internet (due to public outrage, the proposal was dropped from a House bill in February).

Government and corporate groups cited LulzSec and Anonymous lawlessness last June to push the so-called Protect IP Act (known as PIPA). The introduction of a House version of the bill, dubbed SOPA (Stop Online Privacy Act), was met with public outrage and widespread activism that forced Congress to reconsider the legislation.

In October, Mother Jones revealed that the FBI is notorious for creating supposed terrorist groups from scratch and then framing patsies in order to claim the government is protecting the United States from terrorists and also breathe life into an otherwise moribund war on mostly nonexistent terrorism.

Sabu’s role as an FBI provocateur working inside LulzSec reveals the government is attempting to do the same in order to push its so-called cybersecurity agenda. The establishment is eager to pass a raft of legislation to closely regulate the internet, strip the medium of its anonymity, and close it down as an activism and alternative media tool.

© 2012 Infowars.com

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By kerryrose, March 6, 2012 at 3:41 pm Link to this comment

Too bad. I loved when they screwed the bad-guys… and I don’t care about employee privacy– if you work for criminals you don’t deserve it.

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By John Sullivan, March 6, 2012 at 2:58 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Thank goodness! Now our political and corporate leaders can get back to doing the great and noble work they do in the world.

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