Top Leaderboard, Site wide
August 20, 2014
Truthdig: Drilling Beneath the Headlines
Help us grow by sharing
and liking Truthdig:
Sign up for Truthdig's Email NewsletterLike Truthdig on FacebookFollow Truthdig on TwitterSubscribe to Truthdig's RSS Feed

Newsletter

sign up to get updates






American Catch


Truthdig Bazaar
I Don’t Believe in Atheists

I Don’t Believe in Atheists

By Chris Hedges
$20.75

more items

 
Ear to the Ground

Los Angeles Removes Entire Staff From Troubled School

Email this item Email    Print this item Print    Share this item... Share

Posted on Feb 7, 2012
AP / Damian Dovarganes

Sheriff’s deputies stand outside Miramonte Elementary School south of downtown Los Angeles on Monday.

In the wake of two independent molestation scandals at one of L.A.’s poorest elementary schools, school district Superintendent John Deasy announced that he is temporarily replacing the entire staff—teachers, administrators, janitors—while he tries to make sense of the situation.

Two teachers at Miramonte Elementary School have been accused of sexually abusing their students. Parents staged a protest Monday while police continued to investigate.

The Los Angeles Times reports that the Miramonte staff will be moved en masse while temporary educators are brought in.  —PZS

Los Angeles Times:

The move could be temporary. Many, maybe all, of the current Miramonte staff will be returned to the school eventually, officials said. In the interim, their places will be filled by teachers and other workers on a rehiring list.

The Miramonte staff will continue to be paid and for the time being will move to a nearby campus that is under construction.

Miramonte will be closed for the next two days during the transition. Officials plan to have the new teachers and administrators in place by Thursday. Once students return, each will be interviewed by the district, and a psychiatric social worker will be present in every classroom, Deasy said.

Read more

More Below the Ad

Advertisement

Square, Site wide

New and Improved Comments

If you have trouble leaving a comment, review this help page. Still having problems? Let us know. If you find yourself moderated, take a moment to review our comment policy.

By lane08, February 7, 2012 at 6:10 pm Link to this comment

There may be more information effecting this decision than we have been told.
There may be systemic problems not unlike Penn State—where there was cover
up, ignoring, failure to protect, failure to notice the obvious.

A poster above suggests having monitors in the class as an alternative. That
doesn’t keep the teacher in the classroom from being tarred—if anything it
makes the kids hyper nervous about the teacher being watched. If there’s a kid
in the class who was harmed by one of these teachers—the monitors are far
from being enough of an intervention. A molested kid can be threatened by the
raising of an eyebrow. How would you feel if you’d been molested and the
molester was still your teacher but now watched by two monitors? It’s absurd.

Forcing them all to quit at once has the effect of not tarring any single teacher
b/c all of them are tarred—-so in a funny way it protects the innocent until
there can be a full investigation. If the innocent teachers had stayed on the
job—all the parents would feel squirrely about them and maybe question
them. It was unworkable.

Better to err with a massive response than to fail to respond adequately. If I had
a kid in the school I’d support this, because I would know I *don’t* know which
teachers are involved. I’d feel my kid was afer with this extreme decision. Let’s
see what happens a month from now.

Report this

By lane08, February 7, 2012 at 6:07 pm Link to this comment

There may be more information effecting this decision than we have been told.
There may be systemic problems not unlike Penn State—where there was cover
up, ignoring, failure to protect, failure to notice the obvious.

A poster above suggests having monitors in the class as an alternative. That
doesn’t keep the teacher in the classroom from being tarred—if anything it
makes the kids hyper nervous about the teacher being watched. If there’s a kid
in the class who was harmed by one of these teachers—the monitors are far
from being enough of an intervention. A molested kid can be threatened by the
raising of an eyebrow. How would you feel if you’d been molested and the
molester was still your teacher but now watched by two monitors? It’s absurd.

Forcing them all to quit at once has the effect of not tarring any single teacher
b/c all of them are tarred—-so in a funny way it protects the innocent until
there can be a full investigation. If the innocent teachers had stayed on the
job—all the parents would feel squirrely about them and maybe question
them. It was unworkable.

Better to err with a massive response than to fail to respond adequately. If I had
a kid in the school I’d support this, because I would know I *don’t* know which
teachers are involved. I’d feel safer with this extreme decision. Let’s see what
happens a month form now.

Report this

By American Lion, February 7, 2012 at 10:04 am Link to this comment

Massive over-reaction to a serious issue only inflicts
more damage. This calls for well trained people with
the skills to remove, without trauma, the abuse that is
being discovered here Then tactfully remove any
additional threats for evaluation if they exist.
Burning down the house to get rid of a couple of rats
is not the balanced and intelligent approach.

Report this

By Jim Yell, February 7, 2012 at 9:29 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

It seems to me that with what they are going to pay out for oversight, they could have chosen a simpler process, such as having two monitors in each class room to oversea what the teachers are doing and not to allow teachers to be one on one with students except with a monitor also observing.

I think taring everyone with the same brush, which is very much what they are doing here, there will be long term demoralization of the teaching staff, not just on site, but throughout the schools. Who would willing accept a job when one or two teachers can bring down everyones job?

This is very untidy and has more to do with adminsitration covering their own asses than it does about fixing the problem.

Report this
 
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 

A Progressive Journal of News and Opinion   Publisher, Zuade Kaufman   Editor, Robert Scheer
© 2014 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.