Top Leaderboard, Site wide
Left Masthead
August 27, 2016
Truthdig: Drilling Beneath the Headlines
Sign up for Truthdig's Email NewsletterLike Truthdig on FacebookFollow Truthdig on TwitterSubscribe to Truthdig's RSS Feed

Truthdig Bazaar

Dark Hope

By David Shulman
$14.69

1876

1876

By Gore Vidal
$16.00

more items

 
Ear to the Ground
Print this item

‘Bernie Mopped the Floor With Hillary’ in Charleston Debate

Posted on Jan 18, 2016

    Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders during a break in Sunday’s NBC News-YouTube Democratic presidential debate in Charleston, S.C. (Not pictured: candidate Martin O’Malley.) (Mic Smith / AP)

In the Sunday’s Democratic debate, Hillary Clinton tried to show voters she’s the “serious and sober candidate.” But “if there’s one thing we’ve learned about the political mood of the United States going into 2016,” writes former Bush speechwriter John Podhoretz at The New York Post, “it’s that the public doesn’t seem especially sober.”

“The country is in a rage, Democrats as well as Republicans, at the brokenness of our politics and the stagnation of the middle class,” Podhoretz continues. “Hillary cannot find a way to tap into that — and tapping into that is all Sanders does.”

[Clinton] had a genuinely creepy, Michael-Corleone-in-“Godfather 2” moment when she basically said “we’re both part of the same hypocrisy” after the third man in the debate, Martin O’Malley, criticized her for raising money on Wall Street.

She really doesn’t have a choice but to position herself as the insider’s insider, really, though she could do it more artfully. She talked about how O’Malley had gotten Wall Street donations when he was head of the Democratic Governors Association. “Well,” O’Malley replied, “I’m not getting them now.” […]

On health care, Clinton seemed to walk into a trap. She found herself defending the charge made (by her daughter!) that Bernie Sanders would dismantle ObamaCare.

He made incredibly short work of that by saying that he voted for ObamaCare and simply wants it to be the opening step toward what he calls “Medicare For All” — meaning a single-payer government health care system.

Once again, the fact that Hillary wasn’t comfortable taking that idea on directly shows the weakness of her anti-populist approach. She would say only that to raise new health care ideas would open a can of worms in 2017 that would give Republicans a way to abolish ObamaCare.

That criticism makes no sense. After all, the scenario she was addressing would involve Sanders having been elected president and sitting in the White House — which would mean he would have veto authority over any such Republican action and that the country had decided in 2016 to move farther to the left in any case.

Continue reading here.

—Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

More Below the Ad

Advertisement

Square, Site wide

New and Improved Comments

If you have trouble leaving a comment, review this help page. Still having problems? Let us know. If you find yourself moderated, take a moment to review our comment policy.

Join the conversation

Load Comments
 
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
Right Internal Skyscraper, Site wide
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 

Like Truthdig on Facebook